Showing posts with label Ancestors. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ancestors. Show all posts

Saturday, July 27, 2013

The Ottawa Genealogist July-September 2013

The latest edition of The Ottawa Genealogists was in my mail box the other day, and it covers such events as Genealogy Research in London, UK and Attending WDYTYAL Conference 2013, Step into History: The 19th Annual Beechwood Cemetery Historical Walking Tour, and the article Early Bytown Settlers Index.

One thing I have always enjoyed reading has been Edward and Elizabeth Kipp’s research trips. I have always found them informative, news worthy, and entertaining.  

This time, they were in London and went to the WDYTYAL where they saw some fellow Canadians from Ottawa  – Glenn Wright, John D. Reid, and Leslie Anderson – and took in some lectures while there too.

And they did some research too – on the BLAKE, PINCOMBE/PINKHAM, BULLER, BEARD families.

A good report was given of the Beechwood Cemetery Historical Walking Tour that took place on June 9th, and the theme was the War of 1812.

Some of the people honoured was British Army Officer William Brown Bradley, and his son Edward Sands BRADLEY, Louis-Theodore BESSERAR, and Maria HILL.

It is reported that 300 people were there e to take the walk in good weather, which was led by Kurt Johnson of the Goulburn Museum.  

Jim Stanzell continues with the Early Bytown Settlers Index, and this time he covers the letters J to L.

He gives both the surname, and given name, the reference and page number, and any notes that is included in the Information column.

There is lots of other news in the journal, and you can receive The Ottawa Genealogist by joining the Ontario Genealogical Society at http:// 

Friday, July 26, 2013

UPDATE: New version of the Census of 1851 (1852) database

The Library and Archives Canada has updated the 1851 (1852) census.
The 1851 Census marked the second collection of statistics for the Province of Canada (consisting of Canada West and Canada East). Information was also collected for New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

In addition to searching by geographical information such as province, district, and sub-district, users can now also search by nominal information such as name, given name(s) and age of an individual.

In Canada East and Canada West, the census was supposed to have been taken in 1851, but was actually take in January 1852. 

So, in the Canada East and Canada West, it will be the age of the person's next birthday in 1852, not in 1851 (Column 6).

Also, in Canada East and Canada West, there was an urban and a rural census, and they asked different questions. 

In Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick, the census was taken between June and December 1851.

If you are having difficulty finding the person you are looking for in the 1851-1852 census, not all schedules survived.  

Go to   

Wednesday, November 21, 2012


On Friday, November 23, 7:00 p.m. at the Concordia University, School of Canadian Irish Studies located at the Hall Building, 1455 de Maisonneuve W., Room 1070 (10th floor). Montreal, they will be holding the 7th Annual St. Patrick’s Society Lecture .

The topic of the lecture will be “The Irish Decade of Commemorations: Some Reflections” and the speaker will be Catriona Crowe, National Archives of Ireland.

Catriona Crowe is Head of Special Projects at the National Archives of Ireland. She is Manager of the Irish Census Online Project, which has placed the 1901 and 1911 censuses online free of charge over the last 4 years. She is an Editor of Documents on Irish Foreign Policy, which published its seventh volume, covering the period 1941-45, in November 2010. She is editor of Dublin 1911, published by the Royal Irish Academy in late 2011.

She is Vice-President of the Irish Labour History Society, and a former President of the Women’s History Association. She is Chairperson of the Irish Theatre Institute, which promotes and supports Irish theatre and has created an award-winning website of Irish theatre productions.

I have heard her speak on many occasions and she has a dedication to her subject that is commendable. So if you are near Montreal, and have Irish ancestors, this is a lecture your should not miss. .

The website of the School of Canadian Irish Studies is

Thursday, August 23, 2012

North American Indexing Volunteers Invited to Join New US Immigration & Naturalization Community Project

As many of you know, people who immigrated to North America often went to the United States first, and then proceeded to Canada, and many who went to Canada first, often crossed the border to go to the United States.

So even though this is a FamilySearch Community Project, it should be of interest to Canadians indexers.

FamilySearch says that “It will be an indexing effort to make passenger lists, naturalization records, and other immigration related records freely searchable online. Hundreds of thousands of North American volunteers are expected to contribute over the next 18-24 months, focusing initially on passenger lists from the major US ports”.

To find out more about the project, Individuals, societies and other groups that want to participate should visit From Sea to Shining Sea: Helping Everyone Find US Immigration Ancestors at