Monday, December 28, 2015

Canadian Week in Review 28 December 2015


I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History

First Message transmitted by radio

In 1900, "One Two Three Four -- is it snowing where you are Mr. Thiessen? If it is, telegraph back to me." 

This was the massage sent to Canadian Reginald Fessenden, as they were the first words ever transmitted by radio from a site on Cobb Island in the middle of the Potomac River, near Washington. 

It was six years later, after much fine-tuning, that radio's potential was demonstrated. Fessenden presented radio's first program on Christmas Eve 1906, from Boston.

For more information, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reginald_Fessenden

Youngest Man to receive Victoria Cross

In 1918, Pte. Thomas Ricketts of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment became the youngest soldier ever to be awarded the Victoria Cross for bravery in battle. The 17-year-old was decorated for running through enemy fire to get vital ammunition during the Allied advance through Belgium during the recently-ended First World War.

For more information, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Ricketts 

Social Media

(Photos) Hants History: Dec. 24, 2015 edition 


Here's a look at what was making the news 25 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.

(Video) Join David Farrell in a Journey to New Scotland on STV this January


Join David Farrell as he explores the special bond between our country and Nova Scotia in a Journey to New Scotland this January 3 on STV. 

(Photos) Tragic history of ‘Canada’s Titanic’ arises 


It is only a set of faded and stained mauve-striped men’s pyjamas. 

Displayed inside a glass case at Halifax’s Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, exactly as worn a century ago.

The clothes that represent the living — of which there were very few — on the foggy early morning of May 29, 1914.

Upcoming Canadian Events

Conferences

UNLOCKING THE PAST 2016

International Genealogy Conference UNLOCKING THE PAST 2016 will be held on 
Saturday, April 23, 2016 at the The Beach Club Resort, Parksville, British Columbia of the Qualicum Beach Family History Society in British Columbia. 

The featured speakers will be Colleen Fitzpatrick and Chris Paton, and registration is now open at http://www.eventbrite.ca/e/international-genealogy-conference-unlocking-the-past-2016-tickets-18765135024. It includes an early bird price. 

The website is located at http://www.qbfhs.ca/ 

Genealogy on the Cutting Edge 2016

The Ontario Genealogical Society will be holding its annual conference from June 3rd to 5th at the Toronto’s International Plaza Hotel, Toronto. 

Speakers and agenda has been announced this past week. Registration will open in January. Keep up-to-date with the latest news by following their website at http://www.ogs.on.ca/conference/, or their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/events/171812826485725/

Our Canada – Your Family: Building a Nation 2017

The Ottawa Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society will host the 2017 annual conference, and they have a call out for presentations. 

The conference will be held in Ottawa on June 16-18, 2017 at Algonquin College. The theme of the conference is Our Canada – Your Family: Building a Nation

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS FEBRUARY 15, 2016

To submit proposals or ask questions, please contact the Conference 2017 Program Committee at: program.conference2017@ogs.on.ca. For more information about OGS or Ottawa Branch respectively, please visit: www.ogs.on.ca or www.ogsottawa.on.ca.

Great Canadian Summit

The summit will be held in Brampton, Ontario from October 21 to the 23, 2016 at the
Courtyard Marriott. 

It will be three days of genealogy by speakers such as CHRISTINE WOODCOCK | Director, Genealogy Tours of Scotland, RUTH BLAIR, PLCGS | Professional Genealogist, KATHRYN LAKE HOGAN, UE, PLCGS | Professional Genealogist at Looking 4 Ancestors, and MIKE QUACKENBUSH | Professional Genealogist - Research Coach, to name a few.


Newspaper Articles

Prince Edward Island

RCMP Veterans' Association of P.E.I. locates graves of all deceased members 


A group of former Mounties on P.E.I. who take care of the gravesites of deceased members has now located the graves of all those who have died over the past century. 

The RCMP Veterans' Association of P.E.I. maintains 100 headstones in 45 graveyards across the province.

Nova Scotia

Roman Sword Found Near Oak Island, Nova Scotia May ‘Rewrite’ North American History [Updated] 


While it is has become more widely accepted that the Norse visited the North American continent about 1,000 years ago, according to Smithsonian Magazine, Johannessen and researcher J. Hutton Pulitzer believe that Romans may have visited even earlier. Pulitzer believes that a known, but unexplored, shipwreck near Oak Island has Roman origins. 

Christmas card makes 72nd trip between McGuire and Seller families 


A Christmas tradition involving two families, one Christmas card and 72 years of mail delivery shows no signs of stopping, at least for another generation. 

The 1917 explosion in Halifax that reverberated in Boston 


A massive explosion on the waterfront had rocked the city on December 6, 1917. The event is recorded in photographs, letters and documents at the Nova Scotia Archives.

Amherst gives extension to BMO building 


The town of Amherst has decided to delay the demolition of the former BMO building to give the Nova Scotia Heritage Trust time to come up with a sustainable plan. 

Ontario 

Emma, Liam top 2015 list of Canadian baby names 


Emma and Liam were the most popular names of 2015 chosen by Canadian parents, but names like Nova, Taylor, and even Legend are all gaining fast, according to a website that tracks baby names. 

After 127 years, St. Matthias Anglican parish prepares for final Christmas


An Anglican congregation that's called west Ottawa home for more than a century is celebrating its final Christmas this month.

St. Matthias Anglican Church on Parkdale Avenue is expected to close in February, as declining attendance numbers are forcing parishioners to merge with another Anglican church in Westboro.

Manitoba

Centennial gala to mark momentous occasion


A momentous Canadian human rights milestone will take place on Jan. 28, 2016: 100 years ago on that day, Manitoba women were the first in Canada and the British Commonwealth to be awarded the right to vote and to hold provincial office. 

Saskatchewan

Saskatoon Club steeped in history, focused on the future 


The names on the Saskatoon Club’s founding document — Sutherland, Clinkskill, Ashworth and others — are now familiar as streets and avenues rather than people. But the 108-year-old club they built remains. 

A history worthy of preservation 


To preserve our heritage, we must first know what we have that’s worth preserving.

That’s the basic concept behind Saskatoon’s Register of Historic Places, a list constructed over the course of three years and formalized by city council in October. 

Alberta 

History: New Road to an Old Fort 


From the latter part of the seventeenth century, the Peace River has been known as a wide and kind waterway. Alexander MacKenzie wintered just above the present town of Peace River, and in the following May of 1793, pushed his birch bark canoes up the Peace and across the divide until he discovered Canada’s Pacific Coast. 

British Columbia 

Seaforth cadets recreate Ortona Christmas meal 


Each December, the 2277 Seaforth Highlanders Army Cadets Corps re-enacts the famous Seaforth Regiment Christmas meal enjoyed by Canadian soldiers in Italy during the Second World War, as a fierce battle waged all around them.

Citizen's historical record nearly complete 


The Prince George Citizen is looking to 2016 to finish the newspaper's digitization project current, which was started in 2007 by the Prince George Public Library. Right now, the online accessible digital archive on the library's website covers the paper from 1916 to 1991.

Canadian Stories this Week 

Happy New Year!

It has been our please to bring to you the stories which have made genealogy, heritage and history news in Canada every Monday morning with the Canadian Week in Review (CWR) since April 2012. 

And, we will celebrate the 8th blogiversary of our blog on January the 2nd, and it has been a busy, but rewarding time.

So as we count our blessing for 2015, we hope that 2016 will be a happy, healthy time for everyone, and that your interest in the news will continue to be as exciting as it has been for us. 

And that was the week in Canadian news!

Monday, December 21, 2015

Canadian Week in Review 21 December 2015





I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History

The first North American credit union

In 1900, the first North American credit union was founded in Levis, Quebec by Alphonse Desjardins. "La Caisse Populaire de Levis" ((The Peoples' Bank of Levis) opened for business the following January 23rd, 1901.

Organized to operate out of his home, in 1901, it was the first Credit Union on the North American Continent. Under his leadership, other credit unions came into being across Canada. 




Dawson City, Yukon, was incorporated

In 1901, Dawson City, Yukon, was incorporated. 

In August 1896 Joseph Ladue, a trader and prospector, staked the flat as a town in anticipation of a rush into the Klondike Valley – the Klondike Gold Rush. 

For more information, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawson_City 

Nunavut became the third territory

In 1991, the Canadian government agreed to create a third territory in the North called Nunavut. It officially became a territory on April 1, 1999, and is the newest, largest, northernmost, and least populous territory in Canada. 

The capital Iqaluit was formerly known as Frobisher Bay, and it is located on Baffin Island.

For more information, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nunavut  

Social Media

(Twitter) Ontario Genealogical Society

There will be a new Ontario Genealogical Society Twitter account @OntGenSociety at: https://twitter.com/OntGenSociety. The old account will remain open until January 8th to give our current followers time to move over to the new one. 

If you haven't followed us yet, you welcomed you to do so. 

(Photos) HANTS HISTORY: Dec. 10, 2015 edition 


Here's a look at what was making the news 25 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal, Nova Scotia. 

(Video) Victims of communism monument should be moved off controversial site, government says


The federal government is asking for the planned monument for victims of communism to be moved off a controversial site near the Supreme Court of Canada and back to the originally planned site at the Garden of the Provinces and Territories, farther west of Parliament Hill.

Upcoming Canadian Events

Conferences

UNLOCKING THE PAST 2016

International Genealogy Conference UNLOCKING THE PAST 2016 will be held on Saturday, April 23, 2016 at the The Beach Club Resort, Parksville, British Columbia of the Qualicum Beach Family History Society in British Columbia. 

The featured speakers will be Colleen Fitzpatrick and Chris Paton, and registration is now open at http://www.eventbrite.ca/e/international-genealogy-conference-unlocking-the-past-2016-tickets-18765135024. It includes an early bird price. 

The website is located at http://www.qbfhs.ca/ 

Genealogy on the Cutting Edge 2016 

The Ontario Genealogical Society will be holding its annual conference from June 3rd to 5th at the Toronto’s International Plaza Hotel, Toronto. 

Speakers and agenda has been announced this past week. Registration will open in January. Keep up-to-date with the latest news by following their website at http://www.ogs.on.ca/conference/, or their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/events/171812826485725/ 

Our Canada – Your Family: Building a Nation 2017 

The Ottawa Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society will host the 2017 annual conference, and they have a call out for presentations. 

The conference will be held in Ottawa on June 16-18, 2017 at Algonquin College. The theme of the conference is Our Canada – Your Family: Building a Nation. As 2017 will be the 150th anniversary of the birth of Canada, Ottawa Branch OGS will host the annual OGS conference and give the Conference a national flair, bringing together genealogists and family historians from all over Canada. We are looking for speakers and talks of interest to genealogists from all provinces. 

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS FEBRUARY 15, 2016 

To submit proposals or ask questions, please contact the Conference 2017 Program Committee at: program.conference2017@ogs.on.ca. For more information about OGS or Ottawa Branch respectively, please visit: www.ogs.on.ca or www.ogsottawa.on.ca.

Great Canadian Summit

The summit will be held in Brampton, Ontario from October 21 to the 23, 2016 at the
Courtyard Marriott.

It will be three days of genealogy by speakers such as HRISTINE WOODCOCK | Director, Genealogy Tours of Scotland, RUTH BLAIR, PLCGS | Professional Genealogist, KATHRYN LAKE HOGAN, UE, PLCGS | Professional Genealogist at Looking 4 Ancestors, and MIKE QUACKENBUSH | Professional Genealogist - Research Coach, to name a few. 


Newspaper Articles 

Prince Edward Island

N.S. to discuss options for controversial Cornwallis statue in Halifax


The name of a British military officer once lauded as Halifax’s founder is splashed across the capital city, serving as a constant reminder to the Mi’kmaq community of their ancestors who died under his scalping proclamation more than 260 years ago, says Mi’kmaq elder Daniel Paul.

Nova Scotia

Troublesome history, characters, and their names 


In retrospect, should some people and historical figures be honoured with place names?

Let’s take the name Cornwallis. After a mitigated military career in Europe and the near massacre of Scots at Cullodon, Edward Cornwallis was appointed as Governor of Nova Scotia in 1749.

He chose the site and immediately began establishing the city to be called Halifax. His stay was not long though, leaving in 1752.  

Nazi Germany coin found during CFB Greenwood home demolition


A Nova Scotia man working on a demolition job got the surprise of his life this week -
a Nazi German coin – a 1 Reichspfennig. 

Mother Canada monument a true expression of appreciation for a debt that remains unpaid by most Canadians 


At the risk of using up more than my fair share of space in the Cape Breton Post, I would like to respond to the letter by Dr. Lee-Anne Broadhead ('Memorial would hijack true remembrance,' Nov. 30). 

Cape Breton University to offer Mi'kmaq 'Knowledge Keepers' course 


A new course being launched at Cape Breton University in the new year will try to share Mi'kmaq history, culture and wisdom with the world.

It's called Learning from Knowledge Keepers of Mi'kma'ki and is CBU's response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, many of the whose 94 recommendations relate to education. 

Quebec 

Rare archives offer glimpse into evolution of Montreal Jewish culture 


Deep in the crevices of the Jewish Public Library’s archives lie fascinating ephemera of a Montreal from decades and even centuries past. 

Ontario 

How a statue debate can (re)write history 


The debate over whether to knock statues of controversial figures off their pedestals has erupted again in Canada, as history writers and academics in two cities differ over how the present should influence the honouring of the past.

Walking Toronto through its Muslim history 


There was a walk on Sunday in Toronto called “The History of Muslims in Toronto.” 

It was a 2.5-hour walk and it included stops at the site of the city’s first mosque, established in 1961 in a Dundas St. W. storefront and where one of the city’s first halal butchers set up shop on Roncesvalles Ave. 

Chiming in on history and peace 


The bell has been a not-so-silent witness to local and national history for more than 160 years. 

The bell was initially installed on the roof at the former St. John School in Fort Erie in the 1850s. In 1918, the bell rang out to mark the end of the First World War. 

New Oji-Cree phrasebook launching in Thunder Bay 


First Nations people hoping to hold onto the traditional language of Oji-Cree will have a new tool to help them.

Pocket Oji-Cree is a phrase book being launched in Thunder Bay, Ont. on Saturday, Dec. 19.

Construction halted near Sparks Street after bones discovered 


Construction at a site on Sparks Street, Ottawa, between Metcalfe and Elgin streets, was halted over the noon hour on Thursday when workers discovered bones. 

Police stopped work on the site behind 62 Sparks St. after workers came across the remains. 

History Corner: Malcolm McCormick 


Malcolm McCormick was a native of Puslinch Township, born on August 29, 1854, the eighth child of ten, to William McCormick and Betty McMillan. His parents emigrated from Argyllshire, Scotland in 1841 and were among the original settlers of the district. 

Saskatchewan 

Mormons helping Saskatchewan bring archives to digital age


Mormons are helping Saskatchewan bring its archives into the future.

Since 2006, Robert Dilts — a member of the Church of Latter Day Saints — has taken about 650,000 pictures every year of documents at the Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan, previously known as the Saskatchewan Archives Board, so there is a stored digital form of the record. 

Alberta 

Alberta Heritage projects get $790,000 in grants 


Alberta heritage preservation projects from restoring a Second World War-era steam locomotive to studying Ismaili Muslim chants have reeled in $790,000 in government grants. 

British Columbia 

Rallying the troops to save CFB Chilliwack's history 


Carol Law is rallying the troops to help save the future of our military past. 

She may seem like an unlikely candidate to be spearheading the charge, as someone who never served in the military, but she’s a passionate advocate for those who did. 

Canadian Stories this Week

Webinar Series 2016

The Ontario Genealogists Society has changed it's view on hosting Webinars. Ever since it started, the Webinars had only been opened to the members, but now it is open to the first 100 who registrar. 

It is held the 1st Thursday of each month at 7:00 pm ET. 

Go to https://ogs.on.ca/webinars.php to register. You will receive an e-mail confirmation with your own personal link to join the webinar. Automated reminder e-mails are set for 3 days prior, and 1 hour prior to the live presentation. 

One last word about Ancestry

And if you still need some guidance on the Ancestry matter of discontinuing the Family Tree Maker software, Dear Myrt's Genealogy Hangout on Air at https://plus.google.com/communities/104382659430904043232, is a good refresher. She points out other software which is available to use.

And fellow Canadian, Louis Kessler from Winnipeg has a few words to add also. His webpage is at https://plus.google.com/+LouisKessler/posts

Happy Holidays 


Both Mario and I would like to wish everyone the very best of the Holiday, and the Canadian Week in Review (CWR) will be in your mail box next Monday morning, as usual. 

If you would like to receive the CWR in your mailbox, just subscribe to genealogycanada@aol.com to be added to the mailing list.

Monday, December 14, 2015

Canadian Week in Review 14 December 2015




I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History

In 1752, a government pamphlet in Halifax became the first book published in Canada.

The first known press was established in Halifax by Bartholomew Green, Jr, of Boston in 1751; his partner, John Bushell, launched the first Canadian newspaper, the Halifax Gazette, in 1752. 

Following the outbreak of the American Revolution, in 1775, a large number of United Empire Loyalists printers arrived from New England, and by the mid-1780s there were presses in Saint John, New Brunswick, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, and in Shelburme, and Halifax, Nova Scotia.

To read the biography of John Bushell, go to http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/bushell_john_3E.html

In 1921, "Buzz" Beurling was born. The Canadian flying ace shot down 28 enemy planes in four months during the Second World War. 

Beurling was recognized as "Canada's most famous hero of Second World War", as "The Falcon of Malta" and the "Knight of Malta".

He died in a 1948 plane crash in Italy.

To read about Beurling, go to http://www.constable.ca/caah/beurling.htm

Social Media

(Video) Granville Street's history in under five minutes


If you click on this video, you're not in for a dreary history lesson. Instead, you'll get Granville Street's storied history in under five minutes in entertaining style.

(Video and photos) Rutherford the Time-Travelling Moose shares Edmonton history


Rutherford the Time-Travelling Moose tells the story of Robin, a young Edmontonian, who meets the rather remarkable Rutherford while on a trip to grandma's house. The two quickly hit it off and head out on an adventure through time.

(Blog) Turkeys


Mary Sutherland has written a blog about how her ancestors - great grandparents, Donald and Alice Sutherland - enjoyed eating turkeys at Christmas. 

Upcoming Canadian Events

Conferences 

UNLOCKING THE PAST 2016

International Genealogy Conference UNLOCKING THE PAST 2016 will be held on Saturday, April 23, 2016 at the The Beach Club Resort, Parksville, British Columbia of the Qualicum Beach Family History Society in British Columbia.

The featured speakers will be Colleen Fitzpatrick and Chris Paton, and registration is now open at http://www.eventbrite.ca/e/international-genealogy-conference-unlocking-the-past-2016-tickets-18765135024. It includes an early bird price. 

The website is located at http://www.qbfhs.ca/

Genealogy on the Cutting Edge 2016

The Ontario Genealogical Society will be holding its annual conference from June 3rd to 5th at the Toronto’s International Plaza Hotel, Toronto.

Registration will open soon, and you can keep up-to-date with the latest news by following their website at http://www.ogs.on.ca/conference/, or their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/events/171812826485725/

Our Canada – Your Family: Building a Nation 2017

The Ottawa Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society will host the 2017 annual conference, and they have a call out for presentations.

The conference will be held in Ottawa on June 16-18, 2017 at Algonquin College. The theme of the conference is Our Canada – Your Family: Building a Nation. As 2017 will be the 150th anniversary of the birth of Canada, Ottawa Branch OGS will host the annual OGS conference and give the Conference a national flair, bringing together genealogists and family historians from all over Canada. We are looking for speakers and talks of interest to genealogists from all provinces. 

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS FEBRUARY 15, 2016 

To submit proposals or ask questions, please contact the Conference 2017 Program Committee at: program.conference2017@ogs.on.ca. For more information about OGS or Ottawa Branch respectively, please visit: www.ogs.on.ca or www.ogsottawa.on.ca

Great Canadian Summit

The summit will be held in Brampton, Ontario from October 21 to the 23, 2016 at the 
Courtyard Marriott. 

It will be three days of genealogy by speakers such as HRISTINE WOODCOCK | Director, Genealogy Tours of Scotland, RUTH BLAIR, PLCGS | Professional Genealogist, KATHRYN LAKE HOGAN, UE, PLCGS | Professional Genealogist at Looking 4 Ancestors, and MIKE QUACKENBUSH | Professional Genealogist - Research Coach, to name a few. 


Newspaper Articles

Newfoundland

The Rooms recruit students to train like WW I soldiers


The Rooms in St. John's is challenging students across the province to train like soldiers in the First World War.

The First World War Physical Training Challenge was designed as a way for Kindergarten to Grade 9 students to connect with history.

Prince Edward Island 

Art, architecture and religion flowed through Rev. Robert Tuck’s bloodline.

The Anglican priest was a historian who wrote several books, and a preservationist who worked tirelessly to conserve Prince Edward Island’s churches and other buildings. 

Nova Scotia

Cornwallis statue should be removed from Halifax park, Stephen McNeil says


Premier Stephen McNeil says he is ready to ask Halifax city hall to consider having a statue of city founder Edward Cornwallis removed from a downtown park.

ED COLEMAN HISTORY: When the railway arrived in Kings County


One of the earliest historical books written about Nova Scotia railways was penned by William W. Clarke, a Kentville railway man who, for 50 years, worked on the trains.

Holy Cross Cemetery in Halifax damaged by headstone vandalism


The group that maintains a south-end Halifax cemetery wants to educate — not punish — the vandals who damaged some historical headstones last Monday night.

Cemetery volunteers say around 50 to 70 headstones damaged. 

Ontario

Heritage panel nixes historic Stittsville barn relocation


A developer's bid to move a Stittsville heritage barn suffered a setback Thursday, despite Richcraft Homes' argument that the structure risks being lost amid a box-store redevelopment. 

History: Dec.08, 1941- Infamy, and the Battle of Hong Kong


What is lesser known is that almost simultaneous to the attack on Pearl Harbour, the Japanese army had begun an attack on the British colony of Hong Kong, again with no prior issuing of a declaration of war.

REMEMBERING OUR YESTERDAYS: Looking to see if grandpa was a bigamist using the Ontario Archives to find out 


Although my client’s late father had always been told he had been born in Montreal, we ultimately found his birth record in Toronto. 

Crumbling heritage school may be replaced with four-storey apartment building


The decades-long saga of a derelict Lowertown school may be coming to a close.

But some people in the neighbourhood aren’t happy with the proposed solution, even if city heritage planners argue that a new four-storey apartment building across from the old St. Brigid’s church will “re-animate this corner for the first time since the school was closed decades ago.

Saskatchewan

History Matters: Abdication in Saskatchewan


Edward’s announcement came as a surprise. Canadian newspapers had provided little coverage of the king’s deepening romance with the twice-divorced American socialite Wallis Simpson through the summer and fall of 1936. The public was consequently unprepared for the December abdication crisis.

His departure as king also marked the end of a close relationship with Canada.

Canadian Stories this Week

Trees are disappearing

So, we all learned last week that Ancestry won't be the same after January next year. They won't be supporting Family Tree Maker any more after January 2016, and you won't be able to buy copies after December of this year.

It caused quite a stir in Ancestry's customers.

But if we sit back, and are smart and think about it, we should have the latest tree on our software in the cloud before it is ever loaded onto a tree on the computer! That way, we can keep in a safe place, for this very reason. 

Then, all we will have to do is switch to a new programe. And from what has crossed my desk during this past week, there is lots of companies available. 

So, the lesson to be learned from this, is to have your family tree saved on your computer, in the cloud, in case this happens again. 

FamilySearch

The second bit of news this week was that FamilySearch has put out an advert saying that we should take a “few minutes this holiday season to index so families worldwide can experience the thrill of discovery all year long! You’ll serve others while turning fascinating historical documents into freely searchable treasures online". 

To get more information on indexing, see FamilySearch.org at https://familysearch.org/indexing/get-started-indexer

And that was the week in Canadian news!


Monday, December 7, 2015

Canadian Week in Review 07 December 2015


 


I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History

In 1824, construction began on the Welland Canal connecting Lake Erie and Lake Ontario.

There were four attempts at building the canal, one in 1829, one in 1845, one in 1887, and one in 1932.

A very good, short history of the canal, has been written at http://www.wellandcanal.com/hist.htm




In 1840, Henry Birks, founder of the Birks jewellery chain, was born in Montreal. His parents were from Yorkshire, England, and had emigrated to Canada in 1832.

He opened his small store in 1879, and in 1893, Birks went into partnership with his three sons (William, John and Gerald), and the name of the firm became Henry Birks and Sons. From there, he expanded across the county.

He died in 1928.

For more information, read about his life story in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Birks

In 1872, Lt.-Col. John McCrae, physician, poet, and author of the famous war poem "In Flanders Fields," was born in Guelph, Ontario.

Most people do not know that he had been in the Boer War, and had led the 1st Brigade of Artillery in 1904 after being promoted to Captain and then Major. He then volunteered in the First World War, and in the trenches near Ypres, Belgium, in the area traditionally called Flanders.

McCrae died Jan., 28, 1918 of pneumonia, and was buried at Wimereaux Cemetery in France.

To read about his life, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_McCrae

Social Media

(Video) '3rd hall of Parliament' opens to public in renovated Bank of Montreal building

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/bank-of-montreal-transformed-into-3rd-hall-of-parliament-1.3352061

After nearly eight years of renovations, Canada's so-called "third hall of Parliament" was opened to the public Friday — just in time for people to gather there and watch the speech from the throne.

(VIDEO) Ottawa an important 'cultural landscape' for native Canadians: researchers

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/ottawa-an-important-cultural-landscape-for-native-canadians-researchers

New studies by two Ottawa researchers suggest the National Capital Region was an important “economic and spiritual centre” for native peoples for thousands of years before the arrival of European explorers in the early 1600s.

(Photos) HANTS HISTORY: Dec. 3, 2015 edition

http://www.hantsjournal.ca/Opinion/Columnists/2015-12-03/article-4363227/HANTS-HISTORY%3A-Dec.-3,-2015-edition/1

Here's a look at what was making the news 25 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.

(Video) New museum exhibit celebrates Windsor's French-Canadian roots

http://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/new-museum-exhibit-celebrates-windsors-french-canadian-roots

From last names to streetscapes, Windsor is rooted in French.

Upcoming Canadian Events

Conferences

UNLOCKING THE PAST 2016

International Genealogy Conference UNLOCKING THE PAST 2016 will be held on Saturday, April 23, 2016 at the The Beach Club Resort, Parksville, British Columbia of the Qualicum Beach Family History Society in British Columbia.

The featured speakers will be Colleen Fitzpatrick and Chris Paton, and registration is now open at http://www.eventbrite.ca/e/international-genealogy-conference-unlocking-the-past-2016-tickets-18765135024. It includes an early bird price.

The website is located at http://www.qbfhs.ca/

Genealogy on the Cutting Edge 2016

The Ontario Genealogical Society will be holding its annual conference from June 3rd to 5th at the Toronto’s International Plaza Hotel, Toronto.

Registration will open soon, and you can keep up-to-date with the latest news by following their website at http://www.ogs.on.ca/conference/, or their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/events/171812826485725/



Our Canada – Your Family: Building a Nation 2017

The Ottawa Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society will host the 2017 annual conference, and they have a call out for presentations.

The conference will be held in Ottawa on June 16-18, 2017 at Algonquin College. The theme of the conference is Our Canada – Your Family: Building a Nation. As 2017 will be the 150th anniversary of the birth of Canada, Ottawa Branch OGS will host the annual OGS conference and give the Conference a national flair, bringing together genealogists and family historians from all over Canada. We are looking for speakers and talks of interest to genealogists from all provinces.

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS FEBRUARY 15, 2016

To submit proposals or ask questions, please contact the Conference 2017 Program Committee at: program.conference2017@ogs.on.ca. For more information about OGS or Ottawa Branch respectively, please visit: www.ogs.on.ca or www.ogsottawa.on.ca.

Great Canadian Summit

The summit will be held in Brampton, Ontario from October 21 to the 23, 2016 at the Courtyard Marriott.

It will be three days of genealogy by speakers such as CHRISTINE WOODCOCK | Director, Genealogy Tours of Scotland, RUTH BLAIR, PLCGS | Professional Genealogist, KATHRYN LAKE HOGAN, UE, PLCGS | Professional Genealogist at Looking 4 Ancestors, and MIKE QUACKENBUSH | Professional Genealogist - Research Coach, to name a few.

Registration has opened at http://www.cangensummit.ca/product/full-weekend-registration/

Meetings

Oxford County Genealogical Society

The Oxford County Genealogical Society will be holding their annual general meeting on January 11th, 2016 where they will hold Election for Chair and Vice-Chair.

The speaker will be Gloria Muir, and her topic will be My Trip to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

The meeting is held at Woodstock Public Library, 445 Hunter Street, Woodstock, Ontario at 6:45 p.m.

The website for the Oxford County Genealogical Society is at http://www.oxford.ogs.on.ca/

Heritage Food Open House at GANS

From 2-4 pm on Sunday, December 13, the Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia (GANS) will be hosting a Christmas open house for the monthly meeting, where the concept of Heritage Food will be highlighted.

Food is always an important part of any family celebration but we don’t often think about what the recipes and food traditions handed down in our families tell us about our ancestors. There will be heritage recipes on display, sent in from our members, and hopefully some samples and stories.

The meeting will be held at GANS headquarters at 33 Ochterloney Street, Suite 100, Dartmouth.

The website is at http://www.novascotiaancestors.ca/

Alberta Family History Society

The Alberta Family History Society will hold their meeting on December the 14th from 7 to 9 p.m. at River Park Church, 3818 - 14A Street SW, Calgary, Alberta at which there will be a panel of experts who will offer their opinion on Where Have My Relatives Gone?

They aree also asking members (and any visitors who would like to participate) to bring a tray of goodies for us all to share as this will be their last meeting before Christmas.

The website of the Alberta Family History Society is at http://www.afhs.ab.ca/

Newspaper Articles

Nova Scotia

ED COLEMAN HISTORY: Looking back at letters to show life in Kings County in 1863

http://www.kingscountynews.ca/Opinion/Columnists/2015-12-02/article-4362949/ED-COLEMAN-HISTORY%3A-Looking-back-at-letters-to-show-life-in-Kings-County-in-1863/1

What did your great-grandparent do when they wanted to post a letter, say 150 or so years ago, or if someone wanted to correspond with them by mail?

Lighthouse near Lockeport at risk of collapsing, group says

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/gull-rock-lighthouse-1.3341874

A lighthouse perched on a rock off Nova Scotia's South Shore may not last the winter, community members say.

The Gull Rock lighthouse near Lockeport is crumbling with age, says the Protect Gull Rock Lighthouse group.

New Brunswick

Forgotten graveyards offer insight into black history

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/wheary-graveyard-black-history-1.3343299

Mary McCarthy wants people to know about the Wheary graveyard near Fredericton and other black graveyards in the area that are being forgotten by time and history.

Fredericton considers selling Wilmot Park heritage home.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/wilmot-park-residence-fredericton-1.3346603

The City of Fredericton may sell a heritage home that is located in Wilmot Park that had been used for decades as the residence for the park's on-site groundskeeper.

The home, which is located at the corner of Saunders Street and Odell Avenue, has been vacant since 2013 when the city stopped using an on-site caretaker.

Ontario

What do you know about residential schools? Take the quiz

http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2015/12/05/what-do-you-know-about-residential-schools-take-the-quiz.html

Understanding one of the darkest chapters of Canadian history is crucial, but you may be surprised by some of these facts about residential schools and indigenous history.

Test your knowledge with information drawn from Facing History and Ourselves’ new resource guide.

JOY OF GENEALOGY: Signs you might be a genealogist

http://www.insidetoronto.com/news-story/6157794-joy-of-genealogy-signs-you-might-be-a-genealogist/

We’ve all heard them, the jokes that begin “You might be a redneck if …” We laugh, while at the same time, there’s that niggling feeling that a few have hit a bit too close to home.

Ex-PMs' archived papers include love letters, $500 — even a molar

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/library-archives-canada-politicians-papers-1.3346026

The day after a federal election, while many civil servants are focused on the future and the continuation or transition of the government, one group of public servants is busy sifting through the past.

Archivists from Library and Archives Canada begin the task of sorting, cataloguing and preserving the official papers of politicians whose terms have come to an end.

Saluting Louis Shickluna, Senglea’s master shipbuilder in Canada

http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20151129/life-features/Saluting-Louis-Shickluna-Senglea-s-master-shipbuilder-in-Canada.593980

A Maltese traveller in Canada might be surprised to come across a plaque commemorating a Maltese man and finding out he played a significant part in this faraway city’s history and in Canada’s naval industry.

Manitoba

Province introduces new legislation ensuring students, teachers learn indigenous history, culture

http://winnipeg.ctvnews.ca/province-introduces-new-legislation-ensuring-students-teachers-learn-indigenous-history-culture-1.2684044

Manitoba is introducing new legislation to ensure students and teachers learn about the history and culture of indigenous peoples, the legacy of residential schools and the significance of treaties.

The move to add indigenous history to Manitoba's curriculum follows the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's final report last summer.

Saskatchewan

A city councillor is calling for more diversity in street and park names.

http://thestarphoenix.com/news/local-news/a-city-councillor-is-calling-for-more-diversity-in-street-and-park-names

Veteran Saskatoon city councillor Tiffany Paulsen wants to see more city streets, parks and facilities named for women.

British Columbia

B.C. railroad stories told in new book Whistle Posts West

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/whistle-post-west-tells-bc-railroad-history-1.3342124

A train that sunk in a peat bog in Burnaby, tales of robberies (of money and coal) and silk trains that were of such high priority that all other traffic — including a train carrying King George IV on his 1939 Canadian tour — was pushed off the main line.

Yukon

Signs in McIntyre subdivision tell drivers 'Stop' in Southern Tutchone

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/souther-tutchone-street-signs-whitehorse-1.3352066

A Southern Tutchone word has recently been added to stop signs in the McIntyre subdivision of Whitehorse. The translation isn't exact, but the meaning comes through.

Canadian Stories this Week

1917 Halifax Explosion

Although I did not have relatives who lived in Halifax or Dartmouth at the time of the 1917 Halifax Explosion, I did lived in the north end of Halifax near the The Halifax Explosion Memorial Bell Tower on Fort Needham, which overlooks the area devastated by the Halifax Explosion of December 6, 1917.

The park commemorates those who were killed or suffered injury, and those who lost homes and family when the munitions ship, Mont Blanc, blew up in Halifax Harbour. It also honours the survivors, who rebuilt the cities of Halifax and Dartmouth in the years that followed.

The Nova Scotia Archives now have an online exposition of the “first-hand survivor accounts, observations by visitors in the days immediately afterward, photographs, and other miscellaneous material relating to the disaster of 6 December 1917. This is a continuing series, with new items added each year, leading up to the centenary on 6 December 2017”.

You can see the exposition at http://novascotia.ca/archives/explosion/personal.asp, and I came across a woman, Verna Jeffries, who lives in Gananoque, Ontario who talks about the explosion on http://www.ckwstv.com/2015/12/01/ckws-tv-news-one-of-the-last-survivors-of-halifax-explosion-speaks/. She was six months old at the time of the explosion, and lived to tell the tale.

On that day 2,000 people were killed by collapsed buildings, debris and fires, and 9,000 were injured.

Royal Alberta Museum

As one door closes, another one opens, and this time, it is the Royal Alberta Museum that is closing, with a new museum opening in 2017.

To make the closing of the old museum memorable, a 24-hour Closing Party was held this past weekend at the museum, as it prepares to move to its new building.

You can view http://www.royalalbertamuseum.ca/closingParty/

You can see what people want to know about the Museum on the Move at an FAQ at http://www.royalalbertamuseum.ca/new/faq.cfm

And while no closing party was held when the Canada Science and Technology Museum closed earlier this year, because of airborne mould as a result of a leaky roof and it, too, will be open in the fall 2017.

In the meantime, you can still visit virtually, and there is lots to see at http://cstmuseum.techno-science.ca/en/

Scottish Studies Genealogy Research Repository

News has reached us that the Scottish Studies Genealogy Research Repository at the University of Guelph is hoping to raise $5,000 by using CrowdSourcing. So far, they have raised $480.00.

They say that those who are “interested in the history of the Scottish Canadian community, be they academic historians, genealogists, research students, population scientists, journalists, heritage workers, writers, or any Canadian proud of their Scottish ancestry and heritage”.

It is also understood that the repository will also be used as a facility where people will be able to bequeath their family history which the Institute will digitize, house, preserve for future generations. What a perfect idea!

You can donate at http://uofg.convio.net/site/TR?fr_id=1955&pg=entry

And that was the week in Canadian news!

===========================================================================
Check the Canadian Week in Review (CWR) every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is 
 
It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!
It has been published on a continuous basis every Monday since April 2012!
Copyright © 2015 Genealogy Canada. All rights reserved

Monday, November 30, 2015

Canadian Week in Review (CWR) 30 November 2015


I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History

In 1851, the first North American chapter of the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) opened in Montreal.

It began as a Christian organization, to provide young males and females going to the cities with low-cost housing. The YMCA combined preaching in the streets and the distribution of religious tracts with a social ministry.

To read more about the YMCA, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/YMCA

In 1885, Rocky Mountain Park was established at Banff, Alberta.

It was the first national park in Canada, and only the third in the world.

The park spans 6,641 square kilometres of valleys, mountains, glaciers, forests, meadows, and rivers.

Today, it is known as Banff National Park.

To learn more, please go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banff_National_Park

Social Media

(Photos) HANTS HISTORY: Nov. 26, 2015 edition

http://www.hantsjournal.ca/Opinion/Columnists/2015-11-26/article-4355837/HANTS-HISTORY%3A-Nov.-26,-2015-edition/1

Here's a look at what was making the news 25 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.

(NEW) E-Virtual Website and Facebook group for the Waterloo Region Branch

Tomorrow, there will be a new E-Virtual Website and Facebook group for the Waterloo Region Branch

This site has many exciting features starting with a name index of over 450,000 names and a E-Store for publication purchases. We will have a research form in case you need some help and finally for those who would like to add Waterloo to your OGS membership ($4) you will have even more access to the new members only section of the site.

See what the new website will look like, go to www.waterloo.ogs.on.ca

Upcoming Canadian Events

Conferences
 
UNLOCKING THE PAST 2016

International Genealogy Conference UNLOCKING THE PAST 2016 will be held on Saturday, April 23, 2016 at the The Beach Club Resort, Parksville, British Columbia of the Qualicum Beach Family History Society in British Columbia.

The featured speakers will be Colleen Fitzpatrick and Chris Paton, and registration is now open at http://www.eventbrite.ca/e/international-genealogy-conference-unlocking-the-past-2016-tickets-18765135024. It includes an early bird price.

The website is located at http://www.qbfhs.ca/


Genealogy on the Cutting Edge 2016

The Ontario Genealogical Society will be holding its annual conference from June 3rd to 5th at the Toronto’s International Plaza Hotel, Toronto.

Registration will open soon, and you can keep up-to-date with the latest news by following their website at http://www.ogs.on.ca/conference/, or their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/events/171812826485725/

Our Canada – Your Family: Building a Nation 2017

The Ottawa Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society will host the 2017 annual conference, and they have a call out for presentations.

The conference will be held in Ottawa on June 16-18, 2017 at Algonquin College. The theme of the conference is Our Canada – Your Family: Building a Nation. As 2017 will be the 150th anniversary of the birth of Canada, Ottawa Branch OGS will host the annual OGS conference and give the Conference a national flair, bringing together genealogists and family historians from all over Canada. We are looking for speakers and talks of interest to genealogists from all provinces.

In keeping with this theme, they are invite proposals for presentations on: family history from every region and territory of Canada (e.g. Atlantic Canada, Quebec, Ontario, the Prairies and British Columbia); migration to and from Canada and also within Canada and how this helped to not only build our families, but also Canada; pre- and post-1867 research in Upper Canada; religious associations; military connections; the latest updates on computer, social media and genealogy database technology; the ever growing use of DNA testing for genealogy; and skill-building for family historians (e.g. use of the genealogy proof standard, getting more out of online resources).

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS FEBRUARY 15, 2016

To submit proposals or ask questions, please contact the Conference 2017 Program Committee at: program.conference2017@ogs.on.ca. For more information about OGS or Ottawa Branch respectively, please visit: www.ogs.on.ca or www.ogsottawa.on.ca.

Great Canadian Summit

The summit will be held in Brampton, Ontario from October 21 to the 23, 2016 at the Courtyard Marriott.

It will be three days of genealogy by speakers such as HRISTINE WOODCOCK | Director, Genealogy Tours of Scotland, RUTH BLAIR, PLCGS | Professional Genealogist, KATHRYN LAKE HOGAN, UE, PLCGS | Professional Genealogist at Looking 4 Ancestors, and MIKE QUACKENBUSH | Professional Genealogist - Research Coach, to name, but, a few.

Registration has opened at http://www.cangensummit.ca/product/full-weekend-registration/

Meetings

London & Middlesex Genealogical Society

Saturday 05 Dec 2015 at 10 a.m, Dennis Mulligan explores several detailed finding aids forgotten in the Branch Library for many years, and one of them is An Exciting Discovery - Newspaper finding Aids for local pre-confederation Newspapers.

The meeting will he held at the Presentations are held at the Westmount Branch of the London Public Library, 3200 Wonderland Rd just south of Southdale Rd, London, Ontario, unless otherwise noted.  otherwise.

The website is at https://www.ogs.on.ca/londonmiddlesex/

Introduction to Genealogy (2 parts)
Tuesday, December 1 and 8
Genealogist Elizabeth Briggs will show you how to trace your family tree using family and public records. You’ll learn the types of genealogical resources, how to record your information, and be introduced to selected websites and online internet software. West End Library, 999 Sargent Ave. 6 – 8 pm. both nights.

City of Winnipeg Library Presentations. Registration required - phone 204-986-4677. No cost.

The website is at http://www.mbgenealogy.com/

Newspaper Articles

Nova Scotia

Alexander Keith's beer bottle may be seized from Halifax diver

If Jon Crouse wants ​to taste his 125-year-old ale, he'd better do it soon.

The Nova Scotia government hopes to analyze the beer bottle, which could be deemed a heritage object.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/hfx-diver-may-have-to-give-up-keiths-bottle-1.3340154

Preserving Nova Scotia’s proud military heritage

http://thechronicleherald.ca/more/thriving-50/1324405-preserving-nova-scotia%E2%80%99s-proud-military-heritage

Countless families through- out Nova Scotia are sheltering a treasure-trove of medals and other military memorabilia earned by generations of loved-ones who went off to fight for King and Country.

Worryingly, the chances of this precious history becoming scattered or lost entirely are increasing as the veterans and their descendants pass away.

Prince Edward Island

Cavendish Grove, former Rainbow Valley site, getting revamped

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/cavendish-grove-rainbow-valley-overhaul-1.3332425

They have now built a trail system and green space. Now they are looking for ways to improve the park.

A public meeting was held to discuss their plans Monday night in North Rustico.

P.E.I. author James W. Macnutt explores the history of Maritime courthouses in new book.

http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/Living/2015-11-23/article-4352713/P.E.I.-author-James-W.-Macnutt-explores-the-history-of-Maritime-courthouses-in-new-book/1

Every courthouse has a story.

And James W. Macnutt tells it in his new book, Building For Justice: The Historic Courthouses of the Maritimes.

Trinity United Church's stained glass windows focus of Sunday sermon

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/stained-glass-windows-attraction-1.3330100

On the 151st anniversary of Trinity United Church in Charlottetown last Sunday, the congregation was treated to the history of the building's stained glass windows.

Instead of hearing from the minister, retired heritage consultant Reg Porter spoke about the church's "paintings in glass."

Quebec

President Henry B. Eyring rededicates temple in Montreal

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865642232/President-Henry-B-Eyring-rededicates-temple-in-Montreal.html

The newly renovated Montreal Quebec Temple stands as a tribute to the rich and diverse history of Montreal and the pioneering Latter-day Saints who built the Church in Quebec’s largest bilingual city.

Ontario

History column: Breaking sodbusters' hearts

http://www.thesudburystar.com/2015/11/22/history-column-breaking-sodbusters-hearts

During the 1840s and 1850s, 13 main colonization roads were built criss-crossing central and eastern Ontario to encourage settlement. That was helped by the flaccid economy in Britain, which was motivating people to migrate to the colonies.

Cobourg’s Carl Verge re-imagines his family history in novel 

http://www.northumberlandnews.com/whatson-story/6127862-cobourg-s-carl-verge-re-imagines-his-family-history-in-novel/

With a passion for genealogy, Cobourg resident Carl Verge looked for an interesting way to bring his family history to life.

Manitoba

Exterior restoration on Dome Building almost complete

http://www.brandonsun.com/local/Exterior-restoration-on-Dome-Building-almost-complete-357120411.html?thx=y

A major fundraising campaign to restore the historic Dome Building on the Keystone Centre grounds has reached the halfway point.

Canadian human right's museum commemorates centennial of the Armenian Genocide

http://www.armradio.am/en/2015/11/27/canadian-human-rights-museum-commemorates-centennial-of-the-armenian-genocide/

A delegation comprising members of the Armenian National Committee of Canada, were joined by members and representatives of the local Winnipeg Armenian community at an event organized by the Canadian Human Right’s Museum dedicated to the Centennial of the Armenian Genocide. To commemorate the anniversary, the museum had organized a special evening, which took place on Wednesday, November 25, with renowned Canadian-Armenian director Atom Egoyan and actress Arsinée Khandjian.

Manitoba, a province ‘Built On Agriculture

http://www.manitobacooperator.ca/crops/manitoba-a-province-built-on-agriculture/

The Selkirk settlers arrived in Manitoba 200 years ago only to be told that it wasn’t possible to farm in Western Canada due to the harsh conditions on the land. We all know how that turned out, and because of it, there are countless stories about agriculture in Manitoba today.

Saskatchewan

Saskatoon aims to increase the number of streets with indigenous names

http://thestarphoenix.com/news/local-news/saskatoon-aims-to-increase-the-number-of-streets-with-indigenous-names

Priscilla Settee says a plan by the city to increase the number of Saskatoon streets and public spaces with indigenous names is a step in the right direction.

Alberta

Edmonton soldiers gather bricks to save piece of city's history

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/edmonton-soldiers-gather-bricks-to-save-piece-of-city-s-history-1.3341986

A piece of the city's past was rescued Saturday by a group of citizen soldiers who want to help preserve Edmonton's history.

Several reserve members from the South Alberta Light Horse regiment stacked up and hauled away bricks from the Leamington Mansions, which was destroyed by fire earlier.

British Columbia

Barry Lane illustrates history of the Canadian Pacific rail line

http://www.thesudburystar.com/2015/11/22/history-column-breaking-sodbusters-hearts

Knifing through southeast British Columbia’s Selkirk Mountains, the 330-metre long and 50-metre high bridge was the largest wooden structure in the world upon completion in 1885, and is just one of the historic topics covered in Lane’s illustrative history book Canadian Pacific: The Golden Age of Travel.

Canadian Stories this week

Family History Lesson Plans

Recently, the Ontario Genealogical Society released the Family History Lesson Plans, to be used by Ontario elementary and secondary school educators as educational resources for their classrooms which integrate family history into the Ontario Provincial Curriculum.

With the generous support provided from the Archives of Ontario, each lesson plan includes primary resources for students to work with and learn.

If you want to know more about the lesson plans, go to https://www.ogs.on.ca/leedsandgrenville/index.php/2015/10/20/family-history-lesson-plans-for-the-ontario-provincial-curriculum/

And in the same them as the Ontario Genealogical Society, there now is a new portable website that will offer a rich pedagogical resource bank for students everywhere across Canada, aimed at teaching the role played by Champlain in the early history of Canada.

French and English sector schools, and teachers at the elementary and secondary levels will have access to this new tool that will enable them to find a vast amount of pertinent pedagogical information concerning Champlain: books, magazines, audio clips, short videos, information programs, and more.

The data bank, part of which is downloadable, is meant to be used as a key pedagogical tool used to support history, geography, and French courses as much as for any school that would like to organize activities related to this historical figure.

If you want to know more, go to http://www.champlain1615.ca/en/resources/

Digital Publications: New Partnership Between Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec and Library and Archives Canada

In a recent press release, the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ) and Library and Archives Canada (LAC) are pleased to announce a new agreement concerning digital publications from Quebec publishing companies.

As a result of the partnership, publishers who deposit their publications in the ANEL-De Marque Digital Book Repository will be able to authorize BAnQ to transmit them to LAC. Up to 10,000 digital publications could be added to Canada’s documentary heritage through this initiative in the next two years.

I wonder if there will be agreements signed with other archival instutiomns in the country?

To read more about the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, go to http://www.banq.qc.ca/a_propos_banq/index.html

And that was the week in Canadian news!

===========================================================================
Check the Canadian Week in Review (CWR) every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is 
It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!
It has been published on a continuous basis every Monday since April 2012!
Copyright © 2015 Genealogy Canada. All rights reserved