Showing posts with label Surnames. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Surnames. Show all posts

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Mapping Surnames of Immigrants

The FamilySearch blog on Genealogy Resources has a post about using the surname of your immigrant through the use of surname distribution maps to discover where they may have originated.

The blog says that “These maps graphically display locations where surnames occurred at different periods in time. This strategy provides genealogists with a starting point for research in the birth country, when that information cannot be discovered through sources recorded in the new country of settlement. It works particularly well for less-common surnames and among families that have stayed in the same European locations for centuries”. 

They have a list of countries, with links to maps, including Canada, and a world-wide map. So give it a try. 

Did it work for you?

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Does blended families mean blended surnames

A blended family in Yellowknife has chosen something different – they have used a hybrid surname

They have put together the first four letters of his surname (Van Overbeek) and the last three letters of her last name (Harilyw - they changed the letter ‘y’ to the letter ‘i’ in her name), and came up with  Van Overliw

So what does this do to genealogy? We are now creating special last names that didn’t exist before, it will be a hybrid last name.

Sunday, February 3, 2013

Winter 2013 Families is now published


The latest issue of Families (the journal of the Ontario Genealogical Society, of which I am the editor) has just been released to the members of the society.

There are the articles in this issue –

Conserving, Preserving, and Restoring Your Heritage by Kim Kinnis. This is an excerpt from a book that was jointly published in 2013 by Dundurn Press and the OGS, that take you through the “saving” process ar home. This book is also reviewed on page 33 of Families.

Mrs. Teepell’s Tale by Anne Rahamut is exactly that – a tale about how a number of houses were exported to make room for the Old City Hall Building in Toronto, that you see on the cover.

 The surnames mentioned in the article are BAILEY, BROOMFIELD, CORBOULD, TEEPLE.

This article by Anne Rahamut was the third place winner in the 2011 Keffer Writing Contest.

An article by Brooke Findlay Skelton What Was the Cow Worth? War of 1812 Losses and Claims is on page 10. This article is the latest on the War of 1812, and it takes a looks at the Board of Claims for the War of 1812 Losses “ held at the Library and Archives Canada.

The surnames mentioned in the article are CHISHOLM, COOK, CORWIN, CUDDLE, CUMMINGS, FITZGERALD, LUNDY, LYON, McCLURE, MISENER, SHANNON, SILVERTON.

Willam Poole: Rebel or Relative? by Brian Latham, and he had a brick wall - where was William Poole. Read the article and see how he solved it.

The surnames are ANDERSON, BARCLAY, BEILLY, BOND, CARMAN, CARNEY, CLARKE, CORRIGAN, CUMETT, ELTON, FISHER, GOUR, HARRISON, HAWLY, HILLBORNE, JOHNSON, LAMB,LAWRENCE, MACKENZIE, MARCH, MARSHALL, MATTHEWS, MCPHADDEN, MONTGOMERY, NICKALLS, PORTER, ROBIN(S), ROGERS, RUMMERFELT, SCOTT, SKINNER, SLY, STPLES, VAN NOSTRAM, WTSON, WATTS, WILKE, WIXSON.

Scrathings, Across Cultures: A Memoir of Denial and Discovery is a book by Stephen Heeney. The part that was published in this issue was Chapter 7 of the book Squire and Jane Davis in Onondaga in Brant County, Ontario.

The surnames are DAVIS, BURR, JOHNSON, MARTIN, NORHELEMA.

The last article is Marguerite Brien – “Fille Naturelle” by Bill Amell tells about his Aboriginal ancestor, nd her life in Northern Ontario.

The surname are BRIEN dit DESROCHERS, FLEURY HAMEL/AMELL, PAQUIN, PROULX/PRUE, TURCOTTE.

If you wish to receive a copy of Families, go to http://www.ogs.on.ca to become a member.