Monday, August 22, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 22 August 2016



I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too. 

This Week in Canadian History  

Vancouver Exhibition

1910 – Vancouver Exhibition opened to the public for the first time in 1910. The Canadian Prime Minister, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, officially opened the first annual Pacific National Exhibition, known at the time as "The Industrial Exhibition." 

The Fair was seen as a showcase of British Columbia to the rest of Canada and the world, and was the second-largest event of its kind in North America, behind the New York State Fair. 

For further information, go to http://www.pne.ca/index.html 

Social Media  

(Video) A spooky stroll through Corner Brook 


More than 40 people shuffle down West Street following a man dressed head to toe in black, carrying a cane. 

(Photos) P.E.I. Regiment Museum wants to grow collection and draw more visitors 


Lt.-Col. Glen Moriarity suspects many military gems are stashed away — some intentionally, others inadvertently — in homes across Prince Edward Island. 

Newspaper Articles 

Newfoundland-Labrador  

Newfoundland commemorates Churchill's summit with Roosevelt that shaped history 


Peter Russell has some rocks on his desk from the beach in tiny Ship Harbour, N.L. — the unlikely site of a secretive summit 75 years ago that helped shape the course and aftermath of the Second World War. 

Sad loss: Co-editor of Dictionary of Newfoundland English dead at 91 


Dr. William J. Kirwin, who was the driving force and co-editor of one of Newfoundland and Labrador’s most important books, The Dictionary of Newfoundland English, died on Aug. 4 at the age of 91. 

Nova Scotia 

Society focuses funding on Lunenburg County 


The provincial Medical History Society has received funding to develop exhibits on the medical history of four counties in Nova Scotia, including Lunenburg. 

Ed Coleman’s history: Pirate raid up the Cornwallis River 


In a “memorial” dated Aug. 20, 1778, John Burbidge petitioned the Nova Scotia government on “behalf of himself and many of the principal inhabitants of Kings County” for military protection and compensation following a raid by American privateers up the Cornwallis River.  

Western Union building in North Sydney comes down  


For more than a century, a massive stone building with walls a metre thick and a copper roof was known for its history of receiving and transmitting happy announcements, top-secret messages and heartbreaking notifications. 

New Brunswick 

Fredericton museum unlocks third floor for open house 


The Fredericton Region Museum hosted its annual open house Sunday, this year opening the third floor to visitors interested in the cataloguing process. 

Quebec 

BAnQ Adds 2.4 Million Bibliographic Records to WorldCat 


Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ) has recently added over 2.4 million records to WorldCat, the world's most comprehensive network of data about library collections. 

Ontario 

Peterborough, Ont., opens time capsule from 1864 


A time capsule buried underground in 1864 was opened in the city of Peterborough on Friday, providing a glimpse into life in the Ontario town before the time of Canada's Confederation 

HISTORY CORNER: industrialist Joseph Davidson brought Canada’s first pre-fabricated homes to Etobicoke in mid-19th century, only one remains 


A lumber baron. The American Civil War. An artists’ colony. Pre-fabricated houses. Those phrases may not immediately conjure up the Humber Bay neighbourhood, but they do describe some unique aspects of that area’s history. 

The Amateur Genealogist: Municipal Records (Part 2) 


In part one, the article started with: Municipalities provided an astonishing variety of records ... and that is the best start for this article too. 

JOY OF GENEALOGY: Five tips for finding elusive female ancestors 


We all have at least one – that female ancestor who appears to have left no trail, or a very slim one at best. But with a bit of research and some extra sleuthing, you might find her hiding in plain sight – if you know where to look. 

Manitoba 

Manitobans experience life in the trenches 


Flash back 100 years, to 1916: you're a rifleman with the Canadian military, trained at Camp Hughes near Carberry, issued a steel shrapnel helmet and gun, and sent overseas. 

British Columbia 

Simpcw First Nation marking 100th anniversary of forced relocation 


The Simpcw First Nation are making a symbolic return to their traditional land in Tête Jaune Cache this weekend — marking 100 years since they were forced to leave. 

Canadian Stories this Week 

National Acadian Day 

August 15th was National Acadian Day, and the Prime minister issued a statement in which he said “Acadian roots run centuries deep and stretch long past Confederation. In the early 1600s, Acadians established the first French settlements in what would eventually become Canada. Since then, Acadians have played a significant role in shaping the country we all call home”. 

And Acadians celebrated the day in their own way. For example, the Acadians on Prince Edward Island “gathered at the Farmers' Bank of Rustico, P.E.I. for a "tintamarre" — an interactive Acadian parade. 

People waved flags, shook instruments and were all smiles”. 


They are starting to pick up stream! 




As of today, 320,638 of 640,000 files are available online in our Soldiers of the First World War: 1914-1918 database. Please visit Digitization of the Canadian Expedition Force Service Files at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/Pages/digitization-cef-service-files.aspx more details on the digitization project.

So far, the latest box which they have digitized is Box 5410 and Larocque.



The LAC asks you to please check the database regularly for new additions and if you still have questions after checking the database, you may contact us directly at 1-866-578-7777 for more assistance. 

You are asked to "test drive" a new website

A very dear genealogist friend has a new job!

Noel Montgomery Elliot is now the Director of Research of www.edu.global. It is a new website that has designed for public libraries, archives, university and college libraries, and larger societies (both genealogical and historical), and you - genealogists!

He asked me to “test drive” the website, and after emailing him back and firth, Noel decided to give you, my devoted readers, a special code, so that you could “test drive' it too.

So, here is your special code – group789 

The code gives users a free membership, no strings attached, until October 1st, 2016.

He says “Of course we hope you will mention that we are anxious to have any feedback from our free members, suggestions or discovery of errors. As I said before, genealogists, in my mind, are ideal people to test out the website in advance”.

So here are the directions -

(1) go to edu.Global

(2) go to REGISTER to create your personal account

(3) While registering it will ask for a COUPON: enter group789

Once you have successfully registered, from that point on just LOGIN each time you wish to search.

Important: once you login, please watch the images in a slide show, under"How to Search on edu.global"- that will show the basics of how to use this website. 

Make sure you look around the site, and tell him what you think. 

And that was the week in Canadian news! 

This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012! 

Be sure to tell your friends about us. 

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to genealogycanada@aol.com 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe 

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to www.elrs.biz 

(c) 2016 All rights reserved. 

Monday, August 15, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 15 August 2016


I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

First long-distance phone call 

10 August 1876

Alexander Graham Bell. The world's first long-distance phone call connects the Bell residence with a shoe and boot store in nearby Paris, Ontario.





For Science and Sovereignty! 

On August 13, 1913, HMCS Karluk became lodged in pack ice north of Alaska and remained trapped for the next five months before sinking north of Siberia. This was the first Canadian expedition to the Arctic, and it was responsible for the most thorough study of the Arctic at the time. Their work helped to reinforce Canada’s Northern sovereignty.

For more information, go to http://www.pc.gc.ca/apps/cseh-twih/index_e.asp


Social Media 

(Photo) This Week in Hants History 


Here's a look at what was making the news 35 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.  

(Video) Saskatoon Ex celebrates 130 years of history: Timeline 


During the 1880s, Saskatoon was still in its infancy. Some of the community’s earliest settlers met and created the Temperance Colony Pioneer’s Society – the earliest form of the Saskatoon Prairieland Park Corporation. 

(Video) Iconic P.E.I. landscapes to join Google Street View 


P.E.I.'s iconic North Shore beaches are about to join the Grand Canyon and the Eiffel Tower on Google's Street View project. 

(Photos) Celebrating 200 years of ministry in Twillingate 


The Anglican Church in Twillingate recently celebrated 200 years of ministry in the area.

The weekend festivities included a meet and greet at St. Peter's Hall, an old-fashioned Garden Party at the Twillingate Museum grounds, and a Sunday Parish Celebration of Ministry with Prayer and Praise at St. Peter's Church and also at St. Mary's Church in Herring Neck.  

(Photos) 'Suspicious' fire destroys historic Cottage Craft building in Saint Andrews 


A fire that destroyed a controversial historic waterfront building in Saint Andrews early Monday morning has been deemed "suspicious." 

The former Cottage Craft Woollens building on Water Street, which was undergoing renovations, burned to the ground shortly after 3 a.m. 

(Video) Aboriginal history the centrepiece of $150-million Fort Edmonton expansion 


An aboriginal interpretive centre touted as the showpiece of a $150-million expansion at Fort Edmonton Park will be like no other exhibit in the living-history attraction. 

(Photos) History comes alive at Fort Erie 


Ewan Wardle likes to take his work home with him. 

The program development officer at Fort York in Toronto is an avid re-enactor. He took centre stage as a sergeant major at the Siege at Old Fort Erie over the weekend. 

Newspaper Articles  

Newfoundland-Labrador

Accepting Tamils 30 years ago changed Canada 


Thursday is a special day not only for Tamil-Canadians and Newfoundlanders, but for all Canadians alike, for it was 30 years ago that 155 Tamil refugees were found drifting off the shores of St. Shotts, Newfoundland by three local finishing boats. 

The rescue on that fateful day on Aug. 11, 1986, not only allowed 155 Tamils to start a new life in Canada, but it was also a turning point in Canadian refugee and immigration history. 

St. John’s students to walk in footsteps of Canada’s First and Second World War history 


Two local high school students have won a prestigious national award from the Vimy Foundation to travel to historical sites in Europe, the Beaverbrook Vimy Prize. 

Out of over 200 hundred applicants from across the country and overseas, two students from St. John’s, Owen Martin and Haleh Zabihi, were selected to participate in this flagship scholarship program, now in its 10th year of existence. 

Nova Scotia 

Historical society to receive provincial funding 


The Parrsborough Shore Historical Society is one of six organizations in the province that will receive funding from the Provincial Archival Development Program. 

Historic Cape Breton stone church gets international boost 


Response from across Canada and around the world has helped boost fundraising efforts to restore a historic stone church in Victoria Mines, N.S. 

Indoor wigwam built at Millbrook Cultural & Heritage Centre 


But beyond the weeks Todd Labrador spent preparing the material, there were many years dedicated to learning how to accomplish the task. 

Labrador completed a birch bark wigwam inside the Millbrook Cultural & Heritage Centre this week. The structure is now a permanent display visitors can go inside.  

Prince Edward Island 

Kensington searches for history on horse-drawn hearses 


The Town of Kensington is looking for information about two horse-drawn hearses that have been tucked away in its maintenance garage for about 10 years. 

New Brunswick  

Heritage Field Day ongoing at Campbell Carriage Factory 


The Tantramar Heritage Trust's annual Heritage Field Day is currently underway at the Campbell Carriage Factory (19 Church Street, Middle Sackville), running until 5 p.m. 

Quebec 

After Ottawa River gets heritage designation in Ontario, focus turns to Quebec 


Politicians from both sides of the Ottawa River dove into its choppy waters Saturday morning and emerged talking up the benefits of its recently-bestowed partial heritage designation — while also suggesting Quebec would soon follow suit.  

Ontario 

Canada to update nomination list for UNESCO World Heritage Sites 


For the first time in more than a decade, Ottawa is asking Canadians to nominate national gems as candidates for UNESCO World Heritage Sites. 

Environment Minister Catherine McKenna made the announcement Monday in Grand Pre, N.S., home to one of Canada's 18 UNESCO sites at out of more than 1,000 worldwide.

Submit an application for Canada’s Tentative List at http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/progs/spm-whs/sec06/a.aspx 

Manitoba 

Pieces of Winnipeg's history for sale 


If you're willing to shell out the cash, everyone can now purchase a chunk of Winnipeg history. 

A collection of 56 building fragments is on sale at the Shelmerdine Garden Centre in Headingley, Man., just west of the city. 

Prices for the fragments — which can give a dash of romance to the backyard — range from a few hundred dollars to nearly $10,000 for larger pieces. 

From the Archives: Aug. 12, 1897 


As part of the Hamilton Spectator's 170th birthday, From the Archives revisits big, small and unusual news items from pages of the past. 

Alberta 

Peacekeepers Day: a day to remember and honour Canadians killed in the line of duty 


Members of Canada’s Armed Forces came to Peacekeepers Park to pay tribute to fallen comrades on Sunday 

Ukrainian-Canadians celebrate 125th anniversary of first immigration 


Ukrainian-Canadians showcased more than 100 years of history at Alberta's Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village on Sunday. 

Their celebration marked the 125th anniversary of the first Ukrainian immigration to Canada.
Exploring the life of the pioneers: check out these Alberta museums 


I work my way southeast, down rut-riddled back roads, past umpteen canola fields exploding in yellow blooms, beside abandoned homesteads beaten and broken by a thousand prairie storms, and, eventually, four hours later, roll into the gravel parking lot at the Etzikom Museum and Historic Windmill Centre. 

Preserve, Restore and Repurpose- The Hanna Roundhouse 


This July I had occasion to tour the amazing train roundhouse and turntable at Hanna, Alberta, where the important tenants of preserve, restore and repurpose jumped out at me in spades. 

Celebrating 100 years of nursing 


2016 marks a century of registered nursing practice in Alberta. 

To celebrate the centennial, the College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta (CARNA) has launched a travelling historic display that is making its way across the province. 

Manitoba 

Mapping out Manitoba's history 


While thousands of Manitobans spent the better part of July searching high and low for Pokemon, Gordon Goldsborough was on a different sort of quest. 

Take a tour of Manitoba’s history at Fort Gibraltar 


There’s still plenty of time to visit one of St. Boniface’s most historic treasures this summer. 

Fort Gibraltar, located at 866 St. Joseph St., will continue to hold its historic tours until Aug. 28. 

British Columbia 

Indigenous history of Stanley Park on display with seasonal tour 


The Stanley Park Ecology Society is offering visitors Indigenous-led walking tours during August to explore the traditional uses of local plants. 

Century-old Shuswap Lake mansion with rich B.C. history up for sale 


For the first time ever, an historic tudor-style home is up for sale, at a cost far less than what houses in B.C.'s hot housing markets go for. 

The Collings Mansion is a century-old English mannor in Seymour Arm on B.C.'s Shuswap Lake, built and owned by a celebrated watercolour painter. It's listed for $798,500. 

National historic significance of 1914 Komagata Maru incident recognized 


THE Komagata Maru incident of 1914 was recognized as an event of national historic significance with National Defence Minister Harjit Singh Sajjan unveiling a commemorative plaque from the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. 

Canadian Stories this Week  

Ghost Towns 

The Library and Archives Canada (LAC) had an interesting blog this past week, which talked about Ghost town, roads less travelled, and even lesser known places—how to find them, how to research them. 

And here is their definition of the type of research you can do in Ghost Town at the LCA - “One might think of ghost towns as “geographical ancestors”—predecessors that no longer exist”. Now, isn't that neat! 

And the people at the LAC tell you what resources are available at the LAC to do research. So take advantage of them. Like census, photographs, postmaster's databases, and many more that you can find in their search box. 


PEI Facebook pages

I read The Island Register News newsletter the other day, and noticed that there are two new Facebook pages – one that covers Montague, Georgetown, and Southern Kings County Discussion is posting of information, Discussions and Photos, re: the Montague, Georgetown, and Southern Kings County areas of PEI and including the Queen's panhandle below King's county. You can reached it at https://www.facebook.com/groups/528861873935683/

And he stared yet another group page for those with an interest in Northern and Eastern Kings County areas of PEI including Souris and Surrounding areas. It now has 59 members, and it is available at https://www.facebook.com/groups/736932179773883/ 

And that was the week in Canadian news! 

This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012! 

Be sure to tell your friends about us. 

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to genealogycanada@aol.com 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe 

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to www.elrs.biz 

(c) 2016 All rights reserved.

Canadian Week in Review 18 August 2016


I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

First long-distance phone call 

10 August 1876

Alexander Graham Bell. The world's first long-distance phone call connects the Bell residence with a shoe and boot store in nearby Paris, Ontario.





For Science and Sovereignty! 

On August 13, 1913, HMCS Karluk became lodged in pack ice north of Alaska and remained trapped for the next five months before sinking north of Siberia. This was the first Canadian expedition to the Arctic, and it was responsible for the most thorough study of the Arctic at the time. Their work helped to reinforce Canada’s Northern sovereignty.

For more information, go to http://www.pc.gc.ca/apps/cseh-twih/index_e.asp


Social Media 

(Photo) This Week in Hants History 


Here's a look at what was making the news 35 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.  

(Video) Saskatoon Ex celebrates 130 years of history: Timeline 


During the 1880s, Saskatoon was still in its infancy. Some of the community’s earliest settlers met and created the Temperance Colony Pioneer’s Society – the earliest form of the Saskatoon Prairieland Park Corporation. 

(Video) Iconic P.E.I. landscapes to join Google Street View 


P.E.I.'s iconic North Shore beaches are about to join the Grand Canyon and the Eiffel Tower on Google's Street View project. 

(Photos) Celebrating 200 years of ministry in Twillingate 


The Anglican Church in Twillingate recently celebrated 200 years of ministry in the area.

The weekend festivities included a meet and greet at St. Peter's Hall, an old-fashioned Garden Party at the Twillingate Museum grounds, and a Sunday Parish Celebration of Ministry with Prayer and Praise at St. Peter's Church and also at St. Mary's Church in Herring Neck.  

(Photos) 'Suspicious' fire destroys historic Cottage Craft building in Saint Andrews 


A fire that destroyed a controversial historic waterfront building in Saint Andrews early Monday morning has been deemed "suspicious." 

The former Cottage Craft Woollens building on Water Street, which was undergoing renovations, burned to the ground shortly after 3 a.m. 

(Video) Aboriginal history the centrepiece of $150-million Fort Edmonton expansion 


An aboriginal interpretive centre touted as the showpiece of a $150-million expansion at Fort Edmonton Park will be like no other exhibit in the living-history attraction. 

(Photos) History comes alive at Fort Erie 


Ewan Wardle likes to take his work home with him. 

The program development officer at Fort York in Toronto is an avid re-enactor. He took centre stage as a sergeant major at the Siege at Old Fort Erie over the weekend. 

Newspaper Articles  

Newfoundland-Labrador

Accepting Tamils 30 years ago changed Canada 


Thursday is a special day not only for Tamil-Canadians and Newfoundlanders, but for all Canadians alike, for it was 30 years ago that 155 Tamil refugees were found drifting off the shores of St. Shotts, Newfoundland by three local finishing boats. 

The rescue on that fateful day on Aug. 11, 1986, not only allowed 155 Tamils to start a new life in Canada, but it was also a turning point in Canadian refugee and immigration history. 

St. John’s students to walk in footsteps of Canada’s First and Second World War history 


Two local high school students have won a prestigious national award from the Vimy Foundation to travel to historical sites in Europe, the Beaverbrook Vimy Prize. 

Out of over 200 hundred applicants from across the country and overseas, two students from St. John’s, Owen Martin and Haleh Zabihi, were selected to participate in this flagship scholarship program, now in its 10th year of existence. 

Nova Scotia 

Historical society to receive provincial funding 


The Parrsborough Shore Historical Society is one of six organizations in the province that will receive funding from the Provincial Archival Development Program. 

Historic Cape Breton stone church gets international boost 


Response from across Canada and around the world has helped boost fundraising efforts to restore a historic stone church in Victoria Mines, N.S. 

Indoor wigwam built at Millbrook Cultural & Heritage Centre 


But beyond the weeks Todd Labrador spent preparing the material, there were many years dedicated to learning how to accomplish the task. 

Labrador completed a birch bark wigwam inside the Millbrook Cultural & Heritage Centre this week. The structure is now a permanent display visitors can go inside.  

Prince Edward Island 

Kensington searches for history on horse-drawn hearses 


The Town of Kensington is looking for information about two horse-drawn hearses that have been tucked away in its maintenance garage for about 10 years. 

New Brunswick  

Heritage Field Day ongoing at Campbell Carriage Factory 


The Tantramar Heritage Trust's annual Heritage Field Day is currently underway at the Campbell Carriage Factory (19 Church Street, Middle Sackville), running until 5 p.m. 

Quebec 

After Ottawa River gets heritage designation in Ontario, focus turns to Quebec 


Politicians from both sides of the Ottawa River dove into its choppy waters Saturday morning and emerged talking up the benefits of its recently-bestowed partial heritage designation — while also suggesting Quebec would soon follow suit.  

Ontario 

Canada to update nomination list for UNESCO World Heritage Sites 


For the first time in more than a decade, Ottawa is asking Canadians to nominate national gems as candidates for UNESCO World Heritage Sites. 

Environment Minister Catherine McKenna made the announcement Monday in Grand Pre, N.S., home to one of Canada's 18 UNESCO sites at out of more than 1,000 worldwide.

Submit an application for Canada’s Tentative List at http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/progs/spm-whs/sec06/a.aspx 

Manitoba 

Pieces of Winnipeg's history for sale 


If you're willing to shell out the cash, everyone can now purchase a chunk of Winnipeg history. 

A collection of 56 building fragments is on sale at the Shelmerdine Garden Centre in Headingley, Man., just west of the city. 

Prices for the fragments — which can give a dash of romance to the backyard — range from a few hundred dollars to nearly $10,000 for larger pieces. 

From the Archives: Aug. 12, 1897 


As part of the Hamilton Spectator's 170th birthday, From the Archives revisits big, small and unusual news items from pages of the past. 

Alberta 

Peacekeepers Day: a day to remember and honour Canadians killed in the line of duty 


Members of Canada’s Armed Forces came to Peacekeepers Park to pay tribute to fallen comrades on Sunday 

Ukrainian-Canadians celebrate 125th anniversary of first immigration 


Ukrainian-Canadians showcased more than 100 years of history at Alberta's Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village on Sunday. 

Their celebration marked the 125th anniversary of the first Ukrainian immigration to Canada.
Exploring the life of the pioneers: check out these Alberta museums 


I work my way southeast, down rut-riddled back roads, past umpteen canola fields exploding in yellow blooms, beside abandoned homesteads beaten and broken by a thousand prairie storms, and, eventually, four hours later, roll into the gravel parking lot at the Etzikom Museum and Historic Windmill Centre. 

Preserve, Restore and Repurpose- The Hanna Roundhouse 


This July I had occasion to tour the amazing train roundhouse and turntable at Hanna, Alberta, where the important tenants of preserve, restore and repurpose jumped out at me in spades. 

Celebrating 100 years of nursing 


2016 marks a century of registered nursing practice in Alberta. 

To celebrate the centennial, the College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta (CARNA) has launched a travelling historic display that is making its way across the province. 

Manitoba 

Mapping out Manitoba's history 


While thousands of Manitobans spent the better part of July searching high and low for Pokemon, Gordon Goldsborough was on a different sort of quest. 

Take a tour of Manitoba’s history at Fort Gibraltar 


There’s still plenty of time to visit one of St. Boniface’s most historic treasures this summer. 

Fort Gibraltar, located at 866 St. Joseph St., will continue to hold its historic tours until Aug. 28. 

British Columbia 

Indigenous history of Stanley Park on display with seasonal tour 


The Stanley Park Ecology Society is offering visitors Indigenous-led walking tours during August to explore the traditional uses of local plants. 

Century-old Shuswap Lake mansion with rich B.C. history up for sale 


For the first time ever, an historic tudor-style home is up for sale, at a cost far less than what houses in B.C.'s hot housing markets go for. 

The Collings Mansion is a century-old English mannor in Seymour Arm on B.C.'s Shuswap Lake, built and owned by a celebrated watercolour painter. It's listed for $798,500. 

National historic significance of 1914 Komagata Maru incident recognized 


THE Komagata Maru incident of 1914 was recognized as an event of national historic significance with National Defence Minister Harjit Singh Sajjan unveiling a commemorative plaque from the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. 

Canadian Stories this Week  

Ghost Towns 

The Library and Archives Canada (LAC) had an interesting blog this past week, which talked about Ghost town, roads less travelled, and even lesser known places—how to find them, how to research them. 

And here is their definition of the type of research you can do in Ghost Town at the LCA - “One might think of ghost towns as “geographical ancestors”—predecessors that no longer exist”. Now, isn't that neat! 

And the people at the LAC tell you what resources are available at the LAC to do research. So take advantage of them. Like census, photographs, postmaster's databases, and many more that you can find in their search box. 


PEI Facebook pages

I read The Island Register News newsletter the other day, and noticed that there are two new Facebook pages – one that covers Montague, Georgetown, and Southern Kings County Discussion is posting of information, Discussions and Photos, re: the Montague, Georgetown, and Southern Kings County areas of PEI and including the Queen's panhandle below King's county. You can reached it at https://www.facebook.com/groups/528861873935683/

And he stared yet another group page for those with an interest in Northern and Eastern Kings County areas of PEI including Souris and Surrounding areas. It now has 59 members, and it is available at https://www.facebook.com/groups/736932179773883/ 

And that was the week in Canadian news! 

This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012! 

Be sure to tell your friends about us. 

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to genealogycanada@aol.com 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe 

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to www.elrs.biz 

(c) 2016 All rights reserved.

Monday, August 8, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 08 August 2016




I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

Canada and the First World War 

1914 – Britain declares herself and her Empire at war with Germany and Austria-Hungary when Germany invades Belgium; Canada automatically enters the War on Britain’s declaration. 

This was a sea-change for Canada, some saying that the country grew into an independent nation at the end of the war. 

To read some more, go to http://www.warmuseum.ca/firstworldwar/ 




The Telephone 


1922 – All telephone service in Canada was halted for 80 seconds, starting at 6:25 pm, to mark the death of Alexander Graham Bell on August 2 at his Beinn Bhreagh home on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. 

Although he was born in 1847, in Edinburgh, Scotland, he, with his family, emigrated to Canada, and lived his early years in Ontario, before going to the United States.


Trans-Canada Highway

1962 – Prime Minister John Diefenbaker officially opens the Trans-Canada Highway to traffic.

Stretching nearly 8,000 kilometres from St. John’s, Nfld. to Victoria, B.C., the Trans-Canada Highway is among the longest national highway in the world, traveling through all ten provinces of Canada between its east and west coasts.




Social Media 

(Photos) Sherks sure to share stories at huge reunion 


As the Sherk family reunion takes over Conrad Grebel University College this weekend, the more than 150 attendees will be savouring their much-storied past. 

(Video) Did you know Aug. 1 is Emancipation Day in Ontario? 


Many people are out celebrating Civic Day on Monday but did you know it is also Emancipation Day in Ontario? 

(Photos) Quebec City celebrates its beginnings with Fêtes de la Nouvelle-France 


A parade Wednesday night kicked off the Fêtes de la Nouvelle-France, a historic festival that showcases Quebec City’s 17th and 18th century heritage and culture. 

(Video) Japanese-Canadians push for PNE livestock barns to become historic site 


Most visitors to the PNE will be familiar with the sounds and smells of the cattle and horses in the livestock barns — but few are aware of the building’s dark history. 

During the Second World War, the barns were used to hold thousands of interned Japanese-Canadians. 

Nova Scotia 

Nova Scotia history makes digital jump 


A huge portion of Nova Scotia history has just gone digital.

The Legislative Library has posted all of the available debates of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly (Hansard) from 1868–1993 online, thanks to five years of scanning – and generations of preservation before that.

New Brunswick 

Fredericton museum combines Pokemon Go and historical tour 


It's a tough job to combine both a history tour and Pokemon Go, but the summer students at Fredericton Region Museum are willing to give it a try.  

The legal release of Pokemon Go was on July 17 and it's the game that allows players to catch the classic Nintendo creatures called Pokemon.

Quebec 

The story of the Gatineau River: Historic fights and fierce independence 


Yet it was here, during a snowy autumn late in the 19th century, where the only armed tax revolt in Canadian history took place – our own Boston Tea Party, but with a decidedly different outcome. 

Ontario 

Council hopes Lancaster repairs will fly faster 


The City of Windsor will spend $500,000 over 10 years to help refurbish its prized wartime possession: the Lancaster Bomber. 

Canada kicks off 150-day countdown until start of 150th anniversary party 


Canada is 150 days away from the launch of a yearlong celebration to mark its 150th anniversary. 

Provider of fur, food and floods, the beaver is a Canadian symbol 


As many Canadians take to beaches and cottages for an August long weekend, let's take a moment to consider one of our national symbols that lives out there year-round. 

Out of a farming tragedy came the world's largest Allis-Chalmers tractor collection.


As a seven-year-old boy growing up on a farm near Renfrew, Ont., George Nesbitt would read his father's farming magazines, admiring the pictures of the tractors advertised inside. 

Manitoba 

Heritage Festival returning to Carberry 


The Carberry Heritage Festival is back, and this year, it’s bigger and better than ever. 

Taking place on Friday, Aug. 12 and Saturday, Aug. 13, the event marks the fourth year of heritage celebrations.

Mennonite Heritage Village selected for funding through Canada Cultural Spaces Fund 


The Government of Canada is providing funding of $600,000 to the Mennonite Heritage Village (MHV) through the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF) for cultural infrastructure projects on its campus in Steinbach, Manitoba. In Budget 2016, the Government of Canada announced that it will be investing an additional $168.2 million in cultural infrastructure through CCSF over the next two years. 

Manitoba threshing bee yields new world record 


Owners and operators of antique threshing machines unofficially cracked the world record for a threshing bee at a fundraising event Sunday for the Canadian Foodgrains Bank and Manitoba Agricultural Museum. 

Winnipeg presentation to tell the little-known story of Canada's British Home Children 


From 1867 to 1949, nearly 120,000 children were shipped across the sea to Canada without their parents. These were the British Home Children who were brought over to work on farms or as servants once they arrived. 

Alberta 

Five Edmonton mansions that tell stories about our city's history 


For more than 100 years, Edmonton has been home to some historically significant mansions. With their European-inspired architecture, they certainly have an aged elegance about them. Still intact today, they provide a glimpse into the lavish lifestyle of Edmonton’s past elite. 

Saskatchewan 

Cultural camp offers taste of history 


Time traveling through Alberta’s Ukrainian history has been possible for almost three decades.

The Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village’s (UCHV) week-long Historic Children’s Program for children aged six to 11 and their Junior Interpreter’s Program for ages 12 to 16 encourages kids to unplug and step back in time. The kids visit various farmsteads, experience early 1920s school life, make Ukrainian cuisine, make crafts and learn cultural dances. 

North 

Climate change may cause Cold War-era Arctic military base to resurface 


The hazardous waste of a Cold War-era military base once thought to be buried forever in the Greenland ice sheet may eventually resurface due to climate change, says a new York University study. 

Canadian Stories this Week 

Learn how to easily calculate the relationship between two people 

I have followed Amy Johnson Crow for quite a few years now. I always see if she is on the free live steaming of different conference, and now I see where she is doing Facebook videos, so I decided to take a look. 

Her video, which only lasts about 5 minutes, in an explanation, among other things, of about second cousins 2 times removed, or other relations between cousins.

I hope she does many more short videos, and if you decide to view this one, tell her in the comment section that you learned about it from me at Canadian Week in Review. . She would be happy to hear from you. 


Three more frequently asked genealogy questions  

Here is what the Library and Archives Canada's say are three most frequently asked questions - 

How do I start my genealogy search? 

The first step is to ask questions (such as “who,” “what,” “where”) and start writing down information. Find out which details in your family tree you are missing. 

You can learn more on their website on how to begin your genealogy search. 

Why does LAC have census records but no birth certificates? 

The division of power between the federal government and the provinces dictates which government records are part of the LAC collection. 

The records pertaining to births, marriages and deaths are a provincial jurisdiction and are thus found in provincial and territorial archives. 

I want to search the 1871 Canadian Census for Gimli, Manitoba, but I can’t find it in the LAC database. Why isn’t it there? 

Not all areas in Canada were enumerated in early census returns. Each census return database on the LAC website has a list of the districts and sub-districts that were enumerated. For example, the answer to this question would be that the earliest Gimli (former county of Lisgar) was enumerated was 1891, but Lisgar was enumerated in 1881. 


And that was the week in Canadian news! 

This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012! 

Be sure to tell your friends about us. 

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to genealogycanada@aol.com 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to www.elrs.biz 

(C) 2016 All rights reserved. 

Monday, August 1, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 01 August 2016



I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

War of 1812

In 1814, the bloodiest battle of the War of 1812 was fought at Lundy's Lane. The British suffered 878 casualties, with 84 killed. Although neither side (American/Canadian) could claim victory, the battle checked the advance of invading U.S. forces, and they withdrew to Fort Erie.




If you want to read more, go to http://www.eighteentwelve.ca/?q=eng/Topic/56

Chief Dan George 


In 1899, Oscar-nominated actor Chief Dan George was born on the Burrard Indian Reserve in B.C. He died in 1981.

If you would like to read more, go to http://www.canadaka.net/modules.php?name=Famous_Canadians&action=viewperson&person=401





Social Media 

(Audio) A century later, Great Matheson Fire of 1916 still deadliest in Canadian history 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/sudbury/100-years-great-matheson-fire-1916-1.3689061

Nobody knows for sure how it started.

But the bush around Matheson, Ontario caught fire on July 29, 1916 and burned for days.

By the time the flames were extinguished, some 200 people had suffocated or burned to death, with coffins piled up on the railway tracks.

Whole communities were completely destroyed, including Matheson and Iroquois Falls.

(Video) Adoption in Alberta: No family history? No problem for these adoptive parents 

http://edmontonjournal.com/news/insight/adoption-in-alberta-no-family-history-no-problem-for-these-adoptive-parents

Three years ago, Brett Kerley and Shannon Qualie stood in an Ethiopian orphanage holding a tiny baby girl.

Their daughter. Nora.

(Video) Aviation History on Display in Brandon Manitoba 

http://www.netnewsledger.com/2016/07/25/aviation-history-display-brandon-manitoba/ 

19,000 airmen and women died during World War Two. Many of those individuals trained in Brandon, Manitoba as part of the Commonwealth Air Training Program. Bases like the Brandon training facility provided training for many of those pilots who fought during World War Two.

(Photos) Woodstock waiting for report on historic building's condition after fire 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/woodstock-fire-mayor-rose-building-heritage-1.3696918

The mayor of Woodstock hopes to salvage the facade of an historic building destroyed by fire and rebuild the downtown heritage area left gutted by the blaze.

(Photos) Birds eye view of the St-Isidore church fire 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/birds-eye-view-of-the-st-isidore-church-fire-1.3695610

Several hundred residents in the eastern Ontario town of St-Isidore were forced to flee their neighbourhood as a massive fire destroyed the community's Catholic church.

(Video/Photos) Open the 'doors' to Wawa's back roads

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/sudbury/backroads-bill-wawa-doors-1.3697620

Doors are 'ways in' or 'ways out' of (or to) something.

We usually don't think about the door when we get to it — unless it is a particularly eye-catching one; and there are some artistic ones on the back roads in Northern Ontario.

Newspaper Articles  

Newfoundland 

Digging up the 17th century with MUN's archaeology summer field school 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/memorial-university-archeological-field-school-tors-cove-1.3691139

A group of Memorial University archaeology students has stepped outside the classroom for the summer, to dig up part of the province's history in Tors Cove, on the southern shore of the Avalon Peninsula.

Nova Scotia  

Halifax firm wins Visit Flanders contract 

http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1383421-halifax-firm-wins-visit-flanders-contract

With renewed interest brought on by the First World War centenary, a Halifax company has won the contract to represent Visit Flanders, a Belgian tourist company.

Group ATN will partner with SGP Conferences and Events Ltd. in Toronto and the North American office of Visit Flanders, headquartered in New York.

Belgian tourism company opens in Halifax to attract Canadians to WW I sites 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/belgium-visit-flanders-halifax-office-1.3693033

An office for a Belgian tourism company has opened its doors in Halifax, to entice more Canadians to visit the battlefields of the First World War — and the site of the iconic In Flanders Fields poem.

Historic crazy quilts, embroidery tell a personal story from the past 

http://www.novanewsnow.com/Living/2016-07-24/article-4597079/Historic-crazy-quilts,-embroidery-tell-a-personal-story-from-the-past/1

Crazy quilts handed down through the generations often carry deep personal meaning and represent much more than scraps of old fabric sewn together.

Nova Scotia trips offer glimpses into 10,000-year history 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/5-stops-for-your-nova-scotia-magical-history-tour-1.3683997

With more than 10,000 years of human history, the land of Nova Scotia and the Mi'kmaq packs enough history to fill up your entire summer.

Prince Edward Island 

Summerside a step closer to ambitious library project 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/summerside-inspire-learning-1.3696661

The Summerside Rotary Club is moving to take the next step in building the Inspire Learning Centre, an ambitious library project based on similar ideas to the new library in Halifax.

Panmure Island Lighthouse gets make-over as community takes over 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/pei-panmure-lighthouse-1.3697667

The red and white paint on the Panmure Island Lighthouse glistens in the summer sunshine as visitors and locals stop by to check out the lighthouse's fresh new look.

New Brunswick 

Highland Games celebrate Scottish culture in New Brunswick

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/nb-highland-games-1.3692509

The sounds of bagpipes and drums are cutting through the hot, humid air in downtown Fredericton this weekend as New Brunswickers gather to celebrate Scottish culture.

McAdam seeks funds to repair historic railway station's damaged roof 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/mcadam-railway-station-roof-repair-1.3693487

McAdam is asking the federal and provincial governments to pitch in to fix the roof of the McAdam Railway Station that was damaged during a storm in March.

Frank Carroll, a former mayor of the southwestern village, said the roof on the heritage building was damaged during a powerful winter storm.

Quebec

Name of an unremarkable Rivière-des-Prairies street has a remarkable history 

http://montrealgazette.com/opinion/columnists/second-draft-name-of-an-unremarkable-riviere-des-prairies-street-has-a-remarkable-history

Rue Panis-Charles, in Rivière des Prairies, is a short street of newish, two-storey dwellings in brick and stone. Pleasant though it is, little in its appearance distinguishes it from other streets nearby. Yet what a story lies behind its name.

Montreal Aviation Museum flying high as an attraction 

What was once the best kept secret on the West Island is getting a lot more attention these days.

The Montreal Aviation Museum, located in an old cow barn on McGill University’s McDonald campus, is a rebranding of the Canadian Aviation Heritage Centre.

Ontario 

Ottawa River finally gets heritage river designation — but just the Ontario part 

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/ottawa-river-finally-gets-heritage-river-designation-but-just-the-ontario-part

Parks Canada is ending a decade-long campaign to win recognition for Canada’s “original trans-Canada highway” with the announcement Thursday morning that the federal and Ontario governments have designated the Ontario portion of the Ottawa River as a Canadian Heritage River.

Ontario government selling 3 heritage homes between Guelph and Kitchener 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener-waterloo/mto-guelph-heritage-homes-for-sale-1.3697707

A heritage home at a relatively cheap price might sound like a dream in the current real estate market, but it could be a reality for motivated buyers.

The Ontario Ministry of Transportation has three stone farmhouses for sale on properties between Kitchener and Guelph, but there is a catch — you have to move them.

Tragedy of MS St. Louis remains a blot on Canada’s history 

https://www.thestar.com/news/insight/2016/07/25/tragedy-of-ms-st-louis-remains-a-blot-on-canadas-history.html

In her book, “The Saddest Ship Afloat,” Allison Lawlor tells how Canada and other countries closed their doors to Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi Germany in 1939.

Westmount recognized for historic national significance by Canadian government 

http://globalnews.ca/news/2846710/westmount-recognized-for-historic-national-significance-by-canadian-government/

For Westmount Mayor Peter Trent, it was a moment 16 years in the making: the federal government recognized Westmount Monday with a plaque to commemorate the city’s historic national significance.

Toronto Public Library creating Chinese Canadian Archive 

http://www.metronews.ca/news/toronto/2016/07/27/toronto-public-library-creating-chinese-canadian-archive.html

Toronto Public Library is looking for treasures from your grandma’s attic to build the city’s first Chinese Canadian Archive. It is expected to open this fall.

Manitoba 

Mural honours Manitoba suffragettes 

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/mural-honours-manitoba-suffragettes-388180442.html

The Manitoba women who fought for their right to vote are being recognized on the latest addition to Winnipeg's outdoor mural collection.

A Woman's Parliament, painted by local artist Mandy Van Leeuwen at 560 Sargent Ave., is being unveiled Tuesday morning by the West End BIZ.

Port of Churchill once looked forward to 'great fleets of the future'

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/history-of-port-of-churchill-1.3697864

In the fall of 1931, crowds gathered along the shores in northern Manitoba to watch two steamships pull into the Port of Churchill.

It was a historic moment for Canada's first deepwater arctic port.

Alberta 

Exploring women’s history in the Rockies 

http://www.fitzhugh.ca/exploring-womens-history-in-the-rockies/

University of Alberta professor Colleen Skidmore has spent most of her career researching the history of Canadian photography from the 19th and 20th century, with a particular interest in women’s photographic practices in front of and behind the camera’s lens.

British Columbia 

Lawsuits leave lodge in Glacier National Park derelict 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/glacier-park-lodge-derelict-1.3677278

When Alicia Fox drove through B.C.'s historic Rogers Pass this summer, she was amazed by the stunning mountains that frame the Trans-Canada Highway.

History of famous Vancouver Chinatown restaurant revealed through collected menus 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/history-of-famous-vancouver-chinatown-restaurant-revealed-through-collected-menus-1.3692214

The WK Gardens was once a popular Chinese restaurant in Vancouver's Chinatown that hosted special dinners for notable figures like former Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson and was visited by stars like actor Gary Cooper and Frank Sinatra.

Canadian Stories this Week  

Heritage Day 


Today is a holiday in many provinces, including Ontario, and in Ottawa, it's Lt-Colonel By Day – the founder of the city – known as Bytown Days. He was the supervisor of the building of the Rideau Canal.

Celebrations will be held at the museum, where there will be “a heritage-themed events and entertainment, including blacksmithing, lace making, and musketry demonstrations, interactive tabletop exhibits, costumed characters, free admission to the Bytown Museum”

It's going to be a nice sunny day today, so get out and enjoy yourself at the museum.

If you can't go, visit the museum at http://www.bytowndays.ca/

Korean War


Prime Minster Justin Trudeau paid homage to the Korean War Veterans by saying that “On June 25, 1950, Communist armies from the North charged across the 38th Parallel and invaded South Korea. Over the next several years, more than 26,000 Canadians – many veterans of the Second World War, and some still teenagers – left behind their loved ones to defend a country half a world away”.

He pointed out that 516 Canadians made the ultimate sacrifice, and approximately 7,000 Canadians continued to serve in the tense theatre of operations between the signing of the Armistice and the end of 1955.

To read more about the Korean War, go to Korean War (1950 – 1953) at Veterans Affairs website,
http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/history/korean-war and the

KOREA VETERANS ASSOCIATION OF CANADA INC at http://www.kvacanada.com/canadians_in_the_korean_war.htm

Library and Archives Canada


Some more news has come from the Library and Archives Canada concerning the 100th anniversary of the First World War. They have two initiatives, and they are -

100 Stories: Canadians who served in the First World War

This was a series of stories that was started last year with the debut of 11 stories on Remembrance Day, 2015.

The website is http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/100-stories/Pages/introduction.aspx

Citizen Archivists at LAC

The Friends of the Library and Archives Canada has started to work with the database of the First World War by adding their advanced search with the options such as the place of birth, place and date of enlistment.

The article says that 700 records have been enhanced already.

Their website is http://friendsoflibraryandarchivescanada.ca/en/home.php

Have you written your family history yet?


If you haven't yet, maybe you should read the information by fellow Canadian Lynn Palermo, The Armchair Genealogist, at www.thearmchairgenealogist.com

And don't forget, Lynn was interviewed by Marian Pierre-Louis of The Genealogy Professional Podcast earlier this summer. You can hear the podcast at http://www.thegenealogyprofessional.com/lynn-palermo/

As she says “Not only will a family history book preserve your family legacy but it will be your legacy”.

And that was the week in Canadian news!

This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012!

Be sure to tell your friends about us.

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to genealogycanada@aol.com

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to www.elrs.biz

(c) 2016 All rights reserved.