Showing posts with label Africville. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Africville. Show all posts

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Africville Summer Reunion

This weekend will mark the 29th summer reunion to be held in the former land in north-end Halifax, Nova Scotia known as Africville – a place where American slaves, and other Black people settled in the 1830s.  

They will also dedicate the newly rebuilt Africville Church and Museum this weekend, and it will be the highlight of the reunion of the many American and Candian families which are expected to be there.

And you can read about The Africville Genealogical Society at

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

African-Canadian Societies

Josiah Henson (June 15, 1789 – May 5, 1883). He escaped to Dresden, Ontario in 1830, and founded a settlement and labourer's school for other fugitive slaves from the United States. He became the main character in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin. You can visit the Uncle Tom's Cabin website at

It is thought that the first Black person to live in Canada was Mattheu Da Costa in 1605. He had come to Acadia with Samuel de Champlain (commonly referred to as the “Father of Canada”) on the ship, Jonas, from France.

Da Costa was the interpreter for the French with the Mi’kmaq natives of Nova Scotia, having been in Canada on previous occasions.

Here are some of the websites of Blacks in Canada -

Africville: The Spirit Lives On This was a settlement of people of African descent who were former slaves, escaped slaves, and free people. In the 1960s, the community was destroyed in the theme of “urban renewal", but as the website says, “the community spirit continues to thrive today through annual gatherings and in the stories and photos of an aging generation”.

The Black Loyalist Heritage Society They are in the process of building a new centre to display the Black Heritage of Birchtown, Nova Scatia. There is also the Old School House Museum on site.

Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia They just celebrated their 28th Anniversary this year, and they have just completed the 2011 Museum Renovation.

The Ontario Black History Society A genealogy webpage,, offers leads in Black genealogy.

The Chatham-Kent Black Historical Society The Chatham-Kent Black Historical Society has a current exhibit called “The Black Mecca in the Heritage Room“.

Tomorrow's Post: French-Canadian Societies

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Park to be Renamed Africville

The Chronicle Herald's website, has a notice today that “A historic north-end Halifax park will officially be renamed Africville on Friday (July 29th).

In a ceremony to take place during the Africville Annual Festival / Reunion, Seaview Park will be no more after Mayor Peter Kelly and other dignitaries unveil a new sign. The event will take place at 1 pm.

The renaming is part of a deal reached between the city and the Africville Genealogy Society in 2010.

Future plans for Africville include a church museum, expected to open in the fall, and an interpretative centre”.

The Africville Genealogy Society Read about the history of the genealogical society, view a gallery, and read the stories of former residents.

Africville (on Wikipedia) It gives a short history, and the resources that are available to the researcher.

Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Library and Archives Canada Celebrates Human Rights Anniversary

The Library and Archives Canada (LAC)--in a joint partnership with the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR)--acknowledged the 60th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on December 10th.

A Canadian, John Humphrey, wrote the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948 with the encouragement of Eleanor Roosevelt, the wife of the U.S. President, Franklin D. Roosevelt.

The CMHR has embarked on its first virtual exhibition entitled, "Everybody Has the Rights: a Canadian and The Words that Changed the World", and the LAC has been key in the launch of this inaugural exhibition.

As the press release says, "The LAC identified archival records, offered interpretive captions for each document, digitized documents for the inaugural exhibit and provided advisory services and support for copyright permission requests."

There are four area in which the LAC website can provide you with information on human rights, and they are -

1. The Chinese Head Tax - You can find original certificates and registers of Chinese immigration and links to libraries and institutions if you go to

2. Black History - You can go to the "Under A Northern Star" webpage and read the historical papers of former slaves, read about the events being held at the LAC during Black Heritage Month. or see the photo of Africville, the Black community that once was part of Halifax before it was torn down in the 1960s.

3. Ukrainian History - There are immigration documents such as the passenger lists and land grants which provide a picture of what life was like from 1914 to 1939. They can be viewed at

4. Aboriginal History - There are treaties records, Band and Agencies information, Government of Canada records, the database of Indian Reserves, Jesuit Records, Métis genealogy and the Project Naming web project on

5. And you can go to the Canadian Genealogy Centre and view all the information there is there in a genealogical context in both official languages