Showing posts with label Home Children. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Home Children. Show all posts

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

LAC Postcast: Home Children


The Library and Archives Canada has just released its sixth podcast episode, and this time it’s on the Home Children.

The the press release say “LAC Project Manager and Genealogist Marthe Séguin-Muntz along with John Sayers of the British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa talk about the lives of Canada’s Home Children. They discuss some of the incredible stories of hardship and prosperity in early Canada, share a wealth of resources available at LAC and provide helpful research tips and tools to discover your family history”.

Subscribe to the podcast episodes using RSS or iTunes, or just tune in at: Podcast – Discover Library and Archives Canada: Your History, Your Documentary Heritage.

To go to the postcasts, click on www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/news/podcasts/Pages/home-children.aspx

If you choose not to listen to the postcasts, there is a transcript of the talk on the same page as the postcast.

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

LAC Update: The Home Children — Harold Mornington

In the third article in the LAC series called The Home Children, the LAC looks at Harold Mornington, who served in the British Army in the Second World War.

As the LAC says “the process begins with a search of our main online resource on Home Children. Entering the family name Mornington and the given name Harold into the database yields a single reference; it indicates that Harold was 14 years old when he left Liverpool on March 11, 1932 aboard the SS Montclare, and arrived in Halifax on March 19, 1932. He was part of the last group of 36 children sent to Canada by the Barnardo agency.

The passenger lists from 1925 to 1935 have been digitized and can be consulted online. The digital image of the list of passengers aboard the SS Montclare can be examined as well, which confirms the information found in the home children database. It also contains other information, such as the name and address of Harold’s mother, Mrs. Mornington, who lived at 16 Orlando Street, in Caldmore, Walsall, England. More information about Harold Mornington’s family history can be found by contacting the Barnardo’s Family History Service.

Beginning in the 1920s, immigration inspectors drafted Juvenile Inspection Reports when conducting periodic evaluations of children brought to Canada by different agencies. These files are available only on microfilm. A search on reel T-15424 shows that between 1932 and 1936, Harold Mornington worked for five different employers in the Ontario districts of Durham, Brant, Oxford and Hastings.

A reference found on the site of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission reveals that sometime between 1936 and the beginning of the Second World War, Harold Mornington returned to England. He joined the British Army and died on May 23, 1941, while still a member of the Royal Artillery. He was the son of William Joseph and Elizabeth Mornington.

Lastly, Harold Mornington’s military service record is kept at The National Archives in the United Kingdom”.

If you suspect that your ancestor was a Home Child, or would like to check the databasdes mentioned here, click www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/genealogy/022-908.009-e.html

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

The Oakville Historical Society

The Oakville Historical Society is holding its last Public Speaker Night of the year this Wednesday. The topic for this final event is, “Alice’s Journey – A Personal Story of One Girl’s Journey from the Dr. Barnardo’s Homes to Canada,” as told by Alice’s daughter, Elaine Guther:

“The S.S. Scandinavian, with her precious cargo – Britain’s young children from the DR. BARNARDO’S HOMES cross the Atlantic on their way to Canada….. ALICE was on her way …..but would it be to “Wonderland”? “

The date of the lecture is Wednesday, November 21, 2012 at 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm, and the location is at St. John’s United Church, Dunn & Randall St., Oakville, Ontario.

The admission is Free. Refreshments Served

You may contact The Oakville Historical Society at 905.844.2695 or go to their website at www.oakvillehistory.org

For more information on the Home Children, go to

Home Children http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_Children

Young Immigrants to Canada: Barnardo Homes http://jubilation.uwaterloo.ca/~marj/genealogy/children/Organizations/barnardo.html

Read about this latest news on the Home Children at the Library and Archives Canada Blog at http://thediscoverblog.com/2012/11/20/home-children-introduction

© Elizabeth Lapointe All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Names Added to Home Children (1869-1930) Online Database

The Library and Archives Canada has just issued this press release -

"Gatineau, October 6, 2011 — Library and Archives Canada is pleased to announce the release of a new version of the online database Home Children (1869-1930). More than 20,000 names of children, who came to Canada between 1925 and 1932, were added to the extended version. The names were extracted from passengers lists held at Library and Archives Canada.

The database is available at the following address:
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/home-children/index-e.html

Library and Archives Canada would like to thank the British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa http://www.bifhsgo.ca, and its volunteers without whom this project would not have happened".