Showing posts with label Canada. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Canada. Show all posts

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Ancestry.ca updates Canadian Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current

Ancestry has upgraded the Find A Grave Index on its website, and now there are over 3-million records on Ancestry.com.

Find A Grave provides users with a virtual cemetery experience, with images of grave markers from around the world, as well as photos, biographies, and other details uploaded by volunteers. You may find obituaries and links to other family members included, as well.

But I must sound a note of caution. This is an INDEX, and it is not a SOURCE. These are simply pictures of gravestones, and there can be errors in the data that is put on the stone - even the date of death can be wrong. You will need the death certificate to go along with the burial record in your genealogy.

And another important thing – the gravestone may or may not be a true record of whom is buried under it. The husband or wife may have been remarried after the death of a spouse, and is actually buried with the subsequent spouse, not with the original spouse.

So these indexes must be treated with a dose of caution, and care.

Otherwise, have fun researching, as more and more graves come online.

The website is at http://search.ancestry.ca/search/db.aspx?dbid=60527

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Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-26-january-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

The conference lowers its price – sort of ...

The inaugural National Genealogy Conference—to be held in Halifax this summer from the 17th to the 19th of July—has lowered its price from $895.00 to $210.00 for the conference.

But I think if you look at the programme, they have removed the included tours, accommodations, and some extras like the Ceilidh-style reception (with entertainment) to be held Friday evening. However, these things will still be available at an extra cost.

However, it should be quite a conference. Halifax is especially lovely that time of the year.

The website is at https://www.visiontravel.ca/heidiwilker/en/national-genealogy-conference

If you want to check out my original blog post dated 09 January 2015, go to http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/national-genealogy-conference-in-canada.html

Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-26-january-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Saturday, January 24, 2015

Half-year memberships is becoming popular in Canada

There are a number of societies in Canada now that offer half-year memberships. I believe that the thinking behind this is that people will want to try a half-year membership, and if they find it useful, then maybe they will try a full-year membership next time. Remember, this special deal is usually open to new members only.

So now, the Quebec Family History Society (QFHS) has offered a half-year membership for the period from January 1, 2015 to July 31, 2015 for only $40.00.*

This membership will provide you with a copy of the Summer 2015 issue of their newsletter, Connections, and full member's access to their website. Also, they invite members and non-members alike (free for members) to go to their research library in Montreal to access their many books, and use special genealogy searching programs.

To join, click on the membership form below. After printing and completing the form, you can mail it to them, along with your cheque or money order for $40.00.

The membership form is at http://www.qfhs.ca/upload/files/Special_Membership_Form_2015(1).pdf

The website is at http://www.qfhs.ca

*Their membership year runs from August 1 to July 31. Payment received after May 31 will apply to the next membership year, beginning August 1st. For an individual, the membership costs $75.00 per year for one person, or for two people living at the same address.

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Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-19-january-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

There has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Eaton’s Goes To War

Jay Young, Outreach Officer at the Archives of Ontario (AO), says that the archives has a new online exhibit entitled Eaton’s Goes To War, which shows the contributions made by the T. Eaton Company and its employees to the war effort during the First World War.

Soon after war broke out in 1914, Eaton’s contributed an unprecedented amount to Canada’s war effort. The company announced that all military contracts it received would be delivered at cost, and it even paid the salaries of enlisted employees for the duration of their service, in addition to their military wages.

In total, 3,327 Eaton’s employees across Canada enlisted, with 2,200 from the Toronto store alone.

The press release says that ‘Each time an enlistee employed at Eaton’s Toronto location was shipped overseas, a portrait was taken of him to be displayed prominently in the store. More than 2,000 of these portraits—part of the T. Eaton Company records at the Archives of Ontario—are featured in the exhibit. The faces of these men show an intimate side of the war.

These photographs are an excellent resource for genealogists who are researching their family history in Toronto. In particular, the exhibit allows users to view a list of names of Eaton’s enlistees and their portrait. You might discover that someone in your family was an “Eatonian” – an enlistee employed at Eaton’s.

Eaton’s Goes To War also asks users to contribute their own stories of ancestors who worked for Eaton’s during the 1910s. These stories will help to show how Eaton’s had a personal impact on Ontarians during the Great War.

To view the exhibit, go to http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/en/explore/online/soldiers/remembrance_day.aspx

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Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-19-january-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Thursday, January 22, 2015

Top 100 Websites of 2015


The list of ‘The Best of …’ or the ‘Top 100 Websites of ….’ are starting to appear for 2015.

The first one this year is the Top 100 Websites of 2015 by GenealogyInTime magazine at http://www.genealogyintime.com/articles/top-100-genealogy-websites-of-2015-page02.html. There are only four Canadian sites mentioned in this list.

My first reaction is that Canadian websites have a lot of catching up to do!

The four are -
  • Ancestry.ca - #13
  • GenealogyInTime Magazine - #26
  • Anglo Celtic Roots - #97
  • Global Genealogy - #100
So, on to better results in 2016 for the Canadian websites and blogs.

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Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-19-january-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Saskatchewan Historic Newspapers Online

The Saskatchewan Archives, in partnership with Saskatchewan History Online, is pleased to announce the launch of a new online tool called ‘Saskatchewan Historic Newspapers Online’ (SHNO).

This is the beginning of a new multi-year project which, once completed, will provide online access to all weekly newspapers from 1878–1964 held within the Saskatchewan Archives Collection. The current release focuses on the early years of the First World War, featuring local weekly newspapers from English, French, German, and Ukrainian communities across Saskatchewan.

During the first installation of the Saskatchewan newspaper online program, it will focus on the period from 1878 through to the mid-1960s. The first stage of the project will focus upon Saskatchewan newspapers published during the Great War period, from January 1914 through to the end of hostilities in 1918.

This sounds exciting!

Be sure to drop by their website at http://sabnewspapers.usask.ca

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Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-19-january-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Saturday, January 17, 2015

Acadian Museum of Prince Edward Island receives grant


The Association of the Acadian Museum of Prince Edward Island will receive $25,000 through the Development of Official-Language Communities Program.

The Museum will launch the Causeries du mardi 2015 series to explore the cultural richness of the Island’s Acadians as part of a project called “Le Musée acadien de l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard, gardien du patrimoine acadien depuis 50 ans, continue sa mission” [The Acadian Museum of Prince Edward Island, the guardian of the Island’s Acadian heritage for 50 years, continues its mission].

The funding will also be used for the production of a multimedia exhibition.

The Acadian Museum of Prince Edward Island website is at http://museeacadien.org

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Check the Canadian Week in Review Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-12-january-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012. 

Thursday, January 15, 2015

The Manitoba Museum Wants Artifacts





The Manitoba Museum wants to know if you have artifacts relating to the first time women were allowed to vote in the province. 

A new exhibit called “Nice Women Don’t Want the Vote” will open at the museum on November 5, 2015. The title comes from the words uttered by former Manitoba Premier Sir Rodmond Roblin during a heated exchange with Nellie McClung.

The exhibit will commemorate the 100th anniversary when the Manitoba Legislature amended the Manitoba Election Act on January 28, 1916 to allow women to vote.

“Nice Women Don’t Want to Vote” will run until February 9, 2016 before travelling for the next eight months across Manitoba prior to open at the Canadian Museum of History in Ottawa on November 17, 2016.

Anyone with artifacts or a story for the exhibit should contact Roland Sawatzky at (204) 988-0634 or by email rsawatzky@manitobamuseum.ca.

Read the history of how women won the vote in Manitoba at http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/mb_history/32/womenwonthevote.shtml

Check the Canadian Week in Review Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-12-january-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.




Wednesday, January 14, 2015

A one-day workshop on Genetic Genealogy





The Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society is planning a one-day workshop on 6 June 2015 on Genetic Genealogy and its uses in family history research.

The press release says that "We are looking for speakers who would like to be take part. The workshop will deal with the main types of DNA testing that are used by genealogists as well as how the results from genetic testing are used in conducting or supporting genealogical research. We hope to offer lectures for audiences at the beginner level as well as for people with a more advanced level of knowledge who have used DNA testing”.

The details are at http://torontofamilyhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Call-for-Speakers-Genetic-Genealogy-Workshop-June-2015.pd

The deadline is this Saturday 17 January 2015.

Meanwhile, details of the first annual Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy Colloquium, the final draft of the Genetic Genealogy Standard has officially been announced and released! They are finishing the guidelines for Y-DNA and mtDNA testing and interpretation, and they are putting together some guidance for citing DNA test results in reports, scholarship, and in general.

You can read more at http://www.thegeneticgenealogist.com/2015/01/10/announcing-genetic-genealogy-standards/

If you haven’t done so already, remember to check the Canadian Week in Review Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-12-january-2015.html

It's the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Cape Breton website updated

Wayne Macvicar from Mira Gut, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, has been keeping two websites -
Cape Bretoners at War https://sites.google.com/site/cbatwar and Cape Bretoners in World War Two https://sites.google.com/site/cbinww2

He has updated them again, and the the website Cape Bretoners in World War Two contains an additional 34 individuals for a total of 16,110 plus 208 new pages for fatal casualties in the period Aug-Dec 1944, with photos for 17 individuals that are not on the Canadian Virtual War Memorial <http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/collections/virtualmem> website.

Although he is feeling that he is getting closer to completing the number of individuals that served in the Second World War, he feels that he has jusr the bare amount of information of those who died in service. So he is asking for anyone who has any information they would like to share to fill out the form he has provided on his general Cape Bretoners at War <https://sites.google.com/site/cbatwar> website.

Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-12-january-2015.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Sunday, January 11, 2015

Canada’s first prime minister records


It has been 200 years since the birth of Canada’s first prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, and our interest in him and his life has never diminished. And since we are now celebrating the 200th anniversary of his birth on January 11th, the interest is higher than normal.
The Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has an extensive and varied collection of records related to him, including a virtual exhibition that includes personal papers, photos, artwork, and publications. Within the LAC’s holdings are over 100,000 letters to and from family and close friends, which gives researchers a rare glimpse into his personal life.
You can listen to a podcast Let us be Canadians: Sir John A. Macdonald at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/news/podcasts/Pages/sir-john-macdonald.aspx, or you can go to the fonds at http://collectionscanada.gc.ca/pam_archives/index.php?fuseaction=genitem.displayItem&lang=eng&rec_nbr=104008.

If you haven’t done so already, remember to check the Canadian Week in Review Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-05-january-2015.html 


It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

Saturday, January 10, 2015

The Archives Association of Ontario offers online courses




The Archives Association of Ontario (AAO) is an organization that supports archival associations, those working in archives, as well as users and supporters of archives. It is made up of 300 members from across the province. It involves itself in a network of archives and archivists providing programs, education, and advocacy. 
 
They are offering online courses, some of which may interest you.
 
The courses are -
 
Caring for Paper-Based Collections
January 20


Creating Access to Your Collections
January 27


Exhibiting Your Collections
February 10


Caring for Oversize Paper Artifacts
February 17


Caring for Scrapbooks
February 24


Writing Your NEH Preservation Assistance Grant (Free)
February 25
 
Spring sessions include new webinars on digital topics as well as caring for photographs, and emergency preparedness.
 

Friday, January 9, 2015

National Genealogy Conference in Canada



A travel agency from Guelph, Ontario is where you will register if you want to go to the National Genealogy Conference in Canada at Historic Pier 21 in Halifax, Nova Scotia on July 17 - 19, 2015.

The registration fee of $895.00 (Canadian Funds) per person includes the following -
  • All taxes
  • Full conference program with exceptional genealogy keynote and workshop speakers
  • All food and beverage within the conference schedule
  • The opportunity to submit personal information to have The Scotiabank Family History Centre research immigration information for your family prior to arriving at the conference.
  • Guided tour plus additional on-own time at the Canadian Museum of  Immigration at Pier 21, immigration portal of Canada from 1928 - 1971
  • A professionally guided tour of Halifax, including a visit to the Titanic Graveyard. Experts will be on hand to enhance your experience. Following the tour will be dinner at the Five Fishermen Restaurant, housed in a historic building with ties to the Titanic story.
  • Networking opportunities and information sharing with genealogy enthusiasts from near and far.
Of course, your registration fee does not include the airfare to Halifax, or accommodation.

I am interested to know if any of my readers are going. What is your opinion on the cost of the conference? Is this a reasonable price to pay for a genealogical conference in Canada?

To register, go to http://www.visiontravel.ca/heidiwilker

If you haven’t done so already, remember to check the Canadian Week in Review Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed last week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-05-january-2015.html

It’s the
ONLY
news blog of its kind in Canada!
It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.


Monday, January 5, 2015

Canadian Week in Review - 05 January 2015

I have come across the following Canadian websites, social media websites, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

History

In 1727, James Wolfe, commander of the British expedition that captured Quebec in 1759, died of his wounds during the battle of the Plains of Abraham at Quebec.
To read more about James Wolfe, go to http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/646548/James-Wolfe


In 1872, Canada and the U.S. exchanged telegraphic weather reports for the first time.
For more on the history of telegraphy, go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telegraphy

In 1884, a railway collision at the Humber River, just west of Toronto, took 31 lives.
To read more about the Toronto streetcar system, go to
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto_streetcar_system#Early_history_.281861.E2.80.931945.29

Social Media

(Video) Quebec man on a mission to save barns
http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/quebec-man-on-a-mission-to-save-barns-1.2167507#ixzz3NZhBY5Cq
   Roger Brabant of Rigaud, Que, a town on the road from Ottawa to Montreal, has started to take apart barns which have been slated for demolition, and uses the wood for his products – like cupboards.

Articles

Nova Scotia

Memory Lane Heritage Village goes high tech to boost tourism
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/memory-lane-heritage-village-goes-high-tech-to-boost-tourism-1.2882752

   The Heritage Village includes a dozen buildings set in the style of the 1940s and 1950s, and depicts the typical life of a coastal Nova Scotia community.
 
Nova Scotia music contest honours Viola Desmond’s legacy
http://thechronicleherald.ca/artslife/1259921-nova-scotia-music-contest-honours-viola-desmond%E2%80%99s-legacy
   The contest pays tribute to Viola Desmond and her contributions to Canada’s civil rights movement, and raises awareness of Nova Scotia’s Heritage Day
holiday honouring her on February 16th.


New Brunswick


Last official event held at Royal Canadian Legion Branch 28
http://www.chathamdailynews.ca/2015/01/01/last-official-event-held-at-royal-canadian-legion-branch-28
   A long-time military tradition capped off the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 28's history on New Year's Day.
   The branch hosted its stand-to levee, with more than 250 people in attendance. It was the last official event before it will merge with Branch 628 to create a new organization in February.


Ontario

Ross rifle maligned due to misinformation
http://www.mykawartha.com/opinion-story/5234631-ross-rifle-maligned-due-to-misinformation
   Terry Wieland, from St. Louis, Missouri (formerly of Peterborough, Ontario), a professional gun writer, writes a letter to the editor, in which he defends Lt. Ross Ackerman, by saying that he did not die from rifle malfunction.

Remembering the dead at Huronia Regional Centre
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2014/12/29/remembering_the_dead_at_huronia_regional_centre.html
­   Remember Every Name, a committee of survivors and community members, is working on a plan to mark some 1,440 unmarked graves of former patients at the notorious centre for people with developmental disabilities.

Canada's history not always so 'strong, proud, free'

   The federal government's recent ad campaign distorts history, say some critics of the process.

Saskatchewan


What will Saskatoon look like in the future?

   Saskatoon could be on the precipice of getting a new look, say city officials, architects, and designers. But what that look will be is still open for debate.

Stories of the Year
 
 

One of the biggest stories of the year was the news that the Library and Archives Canada was going to digitize the service files of the First World War men and women, and put them online.
One suggestion that I would like to see as a researcher, in addition to being kept up-to-date, is that the LAC tells us where they are - up to which letter have the files been digitized? It would be easier to judge the rate at which they are doing the scans.
 
Another story has been the realignment of the Ontario Genealogical Society. They declared two branches “inactive” - Haldimand and Norfolk - and there were financial concerns for the organization, both due to lower levels of membership. It seems that they have stabilized themselves as a society, but time will tell.
  
The OGS has also transformed the publication of their journal, Families, from one that is a high-quality, paper-based magazine, into an electronic format, starting with the February 2015 issue.
 
A bit of good news for the Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia, as it moved to its new headquarters in the wider Halifax area. See their website, http://www.novascotiaancestors.ca.
They will be starting a new eight-week course in February 2015 for beginners.
 
And the third news story of the year was the Canadian societies that are going online with Webinars, Live Streaming, and putting genealogy topics on YouTube.
 
And sites like Ancestry.ca who have put on 24 new databases and have updated 5 more this past year, and FamilySearch.org, who has put on or updated their databases covering Canada (thanks to the indexers).
 
So, it has been a good year.
 
And we just got word that Louis Kessler, a genealogist from Winnipeg, Manitoba, has just released his GenSoftReviews for 2014.
 
To read who won the best reviews of 2014, go to http://www.gensoftreviews.com.
 
In 2015, the big news, as Thomas MacEntee says, is doing the Genealogy Do-Over.
  
It involves a 13-week exercise where you look at your genealogy and decide if you need to go back and do parts or all of it over again, because the first time, you may missed putting in sound citations, or do exhaustive research, and now you have a chance to correct it.
  
You can follow the progress at a Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/groups/genealogydoover or add a comment at http://www.geneabloggers.com/tag/genealogy-do-over

So, we wish everyone a Happy New Year, and let’s make 2015 the best ever year we have had for genealogy!

Reminder: Check the Canadian Week in Review next Monday for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada. It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in country!

The next post will be on 12 January 2015.
 

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Canada's First History Youth Forum in Ottawa


Twenty-two students from communities all across Canada have earned themselves a trip to Ottawa later this month during the first Canada's History Youth Forum.

The students were selected following their regional heritage fairs, and tasked with making a short video that demonstrated the historical significance of their topic. 

The videos were all posted online and a public vote encouraged Canadians to watch and support their favourite student flicks. After a combined total of over 34,000 votes, a panel of judges selected twenty-two winners for this year's program. 

The recipients of the 2014 Young Citizens program are: 

Abby Peterson, Rocky Mountain House, AB — Canada & Titanic
Dominic Shoop, Okotoks, AB —The Flintlock Pistol
Dylan Lee, Vancouver, BC — The Chinese Head Tax
Alexandra Mines, Vancouver, BC — Les Réfugiés Indésirables du Canada
Jenna Allison, Winnipeg, MB — Nellie McClung
Rachel Teller, Winnipeg, MB — Sir Frederick Banting
Maude Couturier, Fredericton, NB — Les infirmières militaires canadiennes
Emma Morehouse, Lincoln, NB — Patrick Owens Covered Bridge
Jasmine Rahman, St. John's, NL—The Newfoundland Conscience: A History of Giving
Jack Goldsworthy, Torbay, NL —Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: The Original Way of Life
Ben Strickland, Bridgewater, NS —The Mosquito
Sam Rogers, Lower Onslow, NS — The Black Devil's Brigade
Eastyn Klages, Chatsworth, ON — A Little Taste of Home
Paris Snake, Rama, ON — Residential Schools: The Intergenerational Impacts
Karla McCallum, Charlottetown, PEI —The Journey of the Potato
Harrison Duffy, Kinkora, PEI — History Of the PEI Railway
Élodie Chamberland, Sainte-Hélène-de-Kamouraska, QC — La Seconde Guerre mondiale
Andréanne Girard-Lemieux, Saint-Gédéon-de-Beauce, QC — Reproduction de mocassins amérindiens
Dylan Donald, Regina, SK — Chuckwagon Racing
Ella Forrest, Regina, SK — My Oma's Story
Duncan Snooks, Whitehorse, YT— Jacques Cartier
Maximilian Wanner, Whitehorse, YT — North West Mounted Police 

Honourable mentions include: 

Cauren Bale. De Winton, AB — The Evolution Of Canadian Figure Skating
Amina GuoVancouver, BC — Japanese Canadian internment
Olivia Richards. Vancouver, BC — 1961 train smoke eaters
Siya Johal. Delta, BC — My Sikh Family History
Luke Harris. North Vancouver, BC — Vimy Ridge
Jacob Grant, Winnipeg, MB — Andrew Charles Mynarski
Luke Battcock, Paradise. NL — Gros Morne
Griffin Fancy, Bridgewater. NS — Prestigious Provo
Julia McNeaney. ON — Ridley College
Turner Clarke, Port Colborne. ON — The Wainfleet Bog
Clara Sismondo. Kingston, ON — KCVI : a history
Lise Charles, Charlottetown. PEI — Un pėcheur madelinot
Karine Champagne, Saint-Honoré-de-Shenley. QC — Le patrimoine des Jésuites en Nouvelle-France
Makayla Kaye. Whitehorse, YT — Yukon First nation 

To see more about the Young Citizens Program, visit their website at www.YoungCitizens.ca

Thursday, October 16, 2014

LAC Update: Digitized Canadian Expeditionary Force personnel service files are starting to go online

Credit: Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. 1983-28-826

We have just received this notice from Library and Archives Canada(LAC) that they are finally putting digitized Canadian Expeditionary Force personnel service files on their site.

Here is the notice -

"In January 2014, we announced a project to digitize 640,000 Canadian Expeditionary Force personnel service files as part of the First World War commemoration activities of the Government of Canada. The goal of this project is to provide free access to high-quality digital copies of all service files in PDF format, anytime and anywhere.

Close to 100 years old, these personnel files are quite brittle. Additionally, over the years, service files have been consulted many times, so they are extremely fragile. It was time to take concrete steps to ensure their preservation for future generations.

To achieve this goal, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) will have to close portions of this collection as they undergo preparation, conservation, and digitization. The entire process is complex because each file must be examined: staples, paper clips and glue must be removed, and in some cases, the files must be treated for mould. After this preparation is completed, digitization is next, starting with box No. 1 and going up. Once digitized, the service files will be stored in a permanent, safe environment. We estimate that 32,000,000 pages will be available online once digitization is finished.

We are happy to inform you that we have started posting the digitized files online. They are accessible via our Soldiers of the First World War: 1914–1918 data base. As of today, 76,330 files are available online. Regular uploads of about 5,000 files will take place every two weeks. All digitized files are searchable by name, regimental number and rank. We will inform you as more digitized files are added to the database.'

So the website is at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/first-world-war-1914-1918-cef/Pages/canadian-expeditionary-force.aspx 

Monday, September 29, 2014

Canadian Week in Review - 29 September 2014



I have come across the following Canadian websites, social media items, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

History Week in Canada


In 1780, Benedict Arnold escaped one day after his treason came to light in what was to become the United States. Arnold, a major-general, and commander of the American Fort West Point, had planned to surrender the fort to the British. He became a colonel in the British army, and later lived in Saint John, New Brunswick. He then returned to England, where he died in 1801.

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In 1962, the "Garden of the Provinces" in Ottawa was opened by Prime Minister John Diefenbaker.

To read more about this park, that is opposite the Library and Archives Canada, go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_of_the_Provinces_and_Territories
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Social Media


(Blog) The Recipe Project
http://recipes.hypotheses.org/4378
Valarie J. Korinek is the author of this blog, and a Professor of Canadian History at the University of Saskatchewan.

Nova Scotia

Delegates visit area for N.S. Heritage Conference
http://www.ngnews.ca/News/Local/2014-09-23/article-3879913/Delegates-visit-area-for-N.S.-Heritage-Conference/1
Pictou County, Nova Scotia hosted the Nova Scotia Heritage Conference.

History-Ed Coleman: First World War humour in Hansford’s stories
http://www.novanewsnow.com/Opinion/Columnists/2014-09-21/article-3875711/History-Ed-Coleman%3A-First-World-War-humour-in-Hansford%26rsquo%3Bs-stories/1
Born in 1899, the former Wolfville barber, Cecil Hansford, was 16 when he joined the Canadian Army to fight in the First World War.

Lighthouse mural by Yarmouth artist an attraction for Nova Scotia visitors
http://www.kingscountynews.ca/News/Local/2014-09-23/article-3878832/Lighthouse-mural-by-Yarmouth-artist-an-attraction-for-Nova-Scotia-visitors/1
A Yarmouth artist has painted a mural of 144 Nova Scotia lighthouses that will meet everybody who takes the ferry from Maine to this Nova Scotian town.

New Brunswick

N.B.’s 104th finally gets its due
http://thechronicleherald.ca/books/1239446-nb-s-104th-finally-gets-its-due
Regiment’s War of 1812 efforts shown to be more than a footnote.

Quebec

The Treaty of Paris is in town
http://www.lifeinquebec.com/the-treaty-of-paris-is-in-town-10088/
Quebec City (Quebec) 23 September, 2014 – The Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years’ War between France Britain and Spain. The actual treaty, that was signed on February 10, 1763, is on display at the Musée de la Civilisation starting today, September 23 until October 2nd.

Ontario

Excerpt #6 – The First World War: Excerpts from the diary of Woodman Leonard
http://www.ottawasun.com/2014/09/25/the-first-world-war-excerpts-from-the-diary-of-woodman-leonard
For links to the other installments, visit last week's CWR post at -
http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2014/09/canadian-week-in-review-22-september.html

Canadian government joins 11th-hour search for John A. Macdonald’s precise birthplace
http://o.canada.com/news/canadian-government-joins-11th-hour-search-for-john-a-macdonalds-precise-birthplace
Barely 100 days before planned celebrations to mark the bicentennial of Sir John A. Macdonald’s birth in Glasgow, Scotland, the Canadian government has joined in an 11th-hour search for the precise birthplace of the country’s founding prime minister.

Science and Technology museum closed until 2015
http://www.ottawasun.com/2014/09/23/science-and-tech-museum-closed-until-2015
The Canada Science and Technology Museum will remain close until at least January 2015 because of mould.

Health unit looks back at its history
http://www.northernlife.ca/news/localNews/2014/09/22-sdhu-history-sudbury.aspx
A painstaking account of Sudbury's environmental history, going back to 1883, when Sudbury was only a Canadian Pacific Railway Outpost.

Here are the details on the RCAF’s new uniforms and ranks
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/here-are-the-details-on-the-rcafs-new-uniforms-and-ranks
The Royal Canadian Air Force’s (RCAF) new uniform respects the contributions and sacrifices of airmen and airwomen who served – and continue to serve – with pride and professionalism.

Afghanistan added to Tillsonburg's cenotaph, dedication ceremony planned Oct. 7
http://www.tillsonburgnews.com/2014/09/25/afghanistan-added-to-tillsonburgs-cenotaph-dedication-ceremony-planned-oct-7

Local residents are invited to a special dedication ceremony at the town cenotaph on Tuesday, October 7th to honour members of the International Security Assistance Force who served in Afghanistan.

Alberta

Can we save McKay Avenue School? Or is our history doomed to be history?
http://blogs.edmontonjournal.com/category/edmonton-commons/
McKay Avenue School, built in 1904, also played host to Alberta’s first legislative assemblies. Today, it’s a school museum, and on the endanger list to be torn down.


Alberta Aviation Museum receives historic air mail letter
The letter was part of the very first air mail delivery in Western Canada, flown from Calgary to Edmonton on July 9th, 1918 by Katherine Stinson, in an insubstantial wood and fabric aircraft.

Bison treaty signed by Alberta, Montana tribes
1st treaty among tribes and First Nations in the area since the 1800s
Native tribes from the U.S. and Canada signed a treaty Tuesday establishing an inter-tribal alliance to restore bison to areas of the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains where millions of the animals once roamed.


British Columbia 

Aboriginal tourism operator rebuked for opening burial boxes for travellers
http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/aboriginal-tourism-operator-rebuked-for-opening-burial-boxes-for-travellers-1.2774255
The actions of an aboriginal tourism operator in British Columbia who gave some travellers access to ancient burial boxes, including revealing the skeletal remains inside, have been condemned by his fellow First Nations.

Story of the Week




The society’s webpage is changing
(Editorial)

In years gone by, I used to go to a society’s website to see what was new with the organization, as well as its events,  latest publications, and their yearly executive.

There was so many changes I used to highlight it on my old news summary every week, and later, the Canadian Week in Review, but as time marched on, websites became less and less important, while on the other hand, the Member’s-Only webpages in the majority of a society’s website were becoming more important.

Then, about three years ago or so, the use of blogs by societies became the go-to media of choice for societies. But blogs quickly went out of style, mainly because they needed someone to look after them as people naturally graduated toward them. They needed someone to update them on a daily basis, and it became a hard job to find somebody within the society to take on that responsibility. And then Facebook came into the picture!

In a way, Facebook is their saving grace, because it can do everything that a webpage can do, plus it can add photos, videos, and other people can quickly comment on the posting, so it’s an "everybody" page. People have a feeling that the society belongs to them; whereas, the webpages and even blogs seemed somewhat distant, and there has to be a reason why only about 10% of the genealogy audience reads blogs, while as many as 70% read Facebook to see what is going on (according to a recent survey).

And now Google+ is making inroads on Facebook, although I believe that people are so used to Facebook now, it will be difficult to switch over to Google+. Most of the genealogists I know use Goggle+, along with a combination of Facebook, and yes, even blogs to keep up the date on genealogy news. And with the acquisition of YouTube, and video "Hang Outs", where you can actually listen to a person or people talk about one's favourite subject – Genealogy – it makes for a good combination.

So that is where I see genealogy going these days, until a new idea comes along.

How about you? Have you found that genealogy is cha
nging the way they get their word across to people? What have you experienced?

Let me know your thoughts, and I might post them in a future issue of CWR!

I can be reached at genealoygcanada@aol.com

Reminder: Check the Canadian Week in Review next Monday for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada. It’s theONLY news blog of its kind in country!

The next post will be on 06 October 2014.

Friday, September 26, 2014

Fall Events at Mackenzie House, Toronto


For those of you who do not know, Mackenzie was the last home of William Lyon Mackenzie, the city's first mayor, and one the participants in the Rebellion of 1837.

He returned from self-imposed exile to the United States as a result of his involvement in the rebellion, and the house was bought for him by his friends and supporters in 1858.

There is a host of fall events to be held at Mackenzie House, such as -

High Park Harvest Festival

Sunday, October 5, 12 to 4:30 p.m.
Visit the Mackenzie House table when you come to the High Park Harvest Festival at Colborne Lodge. They will give you information about their museum programs and the opportunity to print a special Harvest Festival souvenir on their historic proof press!

City of the Dead: The Necropolis Cemetery Tour

Sunday, October 19, 1:30 to 3 p.m.

Not recommended for children under 8 years of age.

The walk starts at the Cemetery. Meet at the main entrance.

Join them for a drama-enhanced walk through the Necropolis Cemetery to visit the graves of William Lyon Mackenzie and his family, his fellow rebels and rivals. Hear stories of murder, heartbreak and great perseverance.

After the walk, participants are invited to return to Mackenzie House, for a tour and some light refreshments. 
The Necropolis Cemetery is located at 200 Winchester Street, the west side of the Don Valley near Riverdale Farm.

Pre-registration and pre-payment required. Adults (16 yrs. & older):$12.50 plus tax; Children 8-15 yrs.: $10.50 plus tax.

Spirit Walk

Saturday, October 25 - Three times available At 6:30 p.m., 7:00 p.m. or 7:30 p.m.

Not recommended for children under 8 years of age.

Let your imagination take over as they lead you through downtown alleys and lane ways to discover some of Toronto’s reputedly haunted buildings ….

Return to gas-lit historic Mackenzie House and soothe your goose bumps with mulled cider and biscuits as you hear about the ghost stories associated with the house.

Pre-registration and pre-payment are required. Adults (16 yrs. & older): $12.50 plus tax; Children 8-15 yrs.: $10.50 plus tax

Contact them at 416-392-6915 or email machouse@toronto.ca

The webpage is at http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=8ccf1d18ed7a0410VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD

Their Facebook page is at https://www.facebook.com/mackenziehouse
The story of of William Lyon Mackenzie is at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Lyon_Mackenzie