Showing posts with label Alberta. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Alberta. Show all posts

Monday, February 13, 2017

Canadian Week in Review 13 February 2017


I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History

Naming the Nation

On February 9, 1865, two years before Confederation, Thomas D’Arcy McGee made an impassioned speech recommending “Canada” as the name for the new union between Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

To read a very good account, go to http://www.pc.gc.ca/apps/cseh-twih/index_e.asp

12 February 1901


When Kootenai Brown first came to the Waterton area of southern Alberta, people told him about oil seepage along what is today called Cameron Creek.

Brown told other local ranchers of the find, and on 12 February 1901, the Rocky Mountain Development Company was incorporated to drill for oil. 

Although short-lived, Rocky Mountain Development No. 1 was Western Canada's first producing oil well and the birthplace of today's oil industry.

To read more about this, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_petroleum_industry_in_Canada



Social Media

Events planned to celebrate Devon's Newfoundland ties

http://www.totnes-today.co.uk/article.cfm?id=106086&headline=Events%20planned%20to%20celebrate%20Devon%E2%80%99s%20Newfoundland%20ties&sectionIs=news&searchyear=2017

Totnes is included in an international celebration linking Devon, New­foundland and the man from Compton who is said to have founded the British Empire.

Newspaper Articles 

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia Archives wants you to search your attic for a historic black newspaper

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/the-clarion-newspaper-african-nova-scotians-1.3974228

The Nova Scotia Archives is asking people to check their old stacks of newspapers to help them piece together a part of the province's history.

The Clarion, based in New Glasgow, N.S., was one of the first newspapers published in the province specifically for the black community.

Historic Mounce Mansion listed for sale in Newport Landing


A manor built in the community of Newport Landing has netted a great deal of attention for its historic qualities — and a $435,000 price tag.

The Mounce Mansion on Avondale Road is listed by Eastern Valley Real Estate Ltd., and has a grand history to go with it.

Black History Month: Black Loyalists Exodus to Nova Scotia (1783)


The Black Loyalists were the approximately 3,000 African-American supporters of the British during the American Revolution who were repatriated to British Canada at the end of the conflict. Most settled in Nova Scotia and established what would be, for decades, the largest concentration of black residents in Canada and what was at the time the largest settlement of free blacks outside Africa.

Editor's Note: There are several historical inaccuracies in this article. The Black Loyalists came to Port Roseway (Shelburne) in the summer of 1783, not Halifax. There is the Black Loyalists Heritage Centre in Birchtown, right next to Shelburne, with many exciting programs, and the website is http://blackloyalist.com/ Personally, I am from the area, and my genealogy refers to Black Loyalists. - Elizabeth

http://www.kingscountynews.ca/community/2017/2/10/african-history-month-events-lined-up-at-acadia.html

On Monday, Feb 13, Dr. Catherine Cottreau-Robins, curator of archaeology for Nova Scotia Museums, will present a lecture at 6 p.m. in BAC 132 entitled, ‘The archaeology of slavery and freedom in Nova Scotia.’

Segregation 'even after death' for African Nova Scotians, researcher says

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/segregated-cemeteries-camp-hill-african-nova-scotians-black-communities-1.3971054

A researcher of African Nova Scotian history says shocking examples of systemic racism can be found in the histories of the province's cemeteries, where "even after death, there was segregation."

Ontario

Dionne quintuplets say birth home must be preserved as part of Canadian history

http://www.timescolonist.com/dionne-quintuplets-say-birth-home-must-be-preserved-as-part-of-canadian-history-1.9763744#sthash.tcuW6VN8.dpuf

The two surviving Dionne quintuplets are urging officials in northeastern Ontario to preserve the home where they were born, suggesting there is a "moral obligation" to safeguard a part of Canadian history.

Manitoba

Louis Riel’s Walking Stick Part of New Exhibit at Manitoba Museum

http://www.chrisd.ca/2017/02/09/manitoba-museum-legacies-of-confederation-exhibit/#.WJ3NVnko64s

A new temporary exhibit commemorating Canada’s 150th birthday opened at the Manitoba Museum on Thursday.


Legacies of Confederation: A New Look at Manitoba History” highlights iconic artifacts and specimens from the museum’s vast collection, as well as some loaned items including the seldom seen walking stick used by Louis Riel and a Treaty document dating to 1875.

Saskatchewan 

Saskatoon doc to tell stories of Canada's historic movie theatres

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/saskatoon-documentary-historic-movie-theatres-1.3972330

When The Empire Strikes Back was playing at Saskatoon's Towne Cinema in 1980, it was the hottest ticket in the city, and Mike Fisher was a sleepy little boy out for a night at the movies with his mom and dad.

Alberta

'We have been here for a long time': group promotes black history in Alberta

http://www.metronews.ca/news/edmonton/2017/02/08/new-group-promotes-black-history-in-alberta-.html

Debbie Beaver is a fourth-generation Albertan who gets tired of people asking where she’s from.

The answer is a farm near Barrhead, but it doesn't satisfy most who ask, she said.

“They would say, ‘Well, before that, where was your dad from?’” she said.

“Well, my dad was born in the same place.”


British Columbia

Students preparing for historic trip

http://www.delta-optimist.com/news/students-preparing-for-historic-trip-1.9777995

A group of students and staff from Delta Secondary will be a part of history in April with a trip to Vimy Ridge to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Canada's military victory. The trip is through Education First tours with the focus being attending the anniversary ceremony alongside thousands of other students from across Canada.

Our history is harder than you think

http://www.campbellrivermirror.com/opinion/413069563.html


I’ve recently taken up a new morning ritual.

No, it’s not getting up earlier, getting early morning nutrition or going for a run or anything sensible like that.

I’m testing my knowledge.

Canada Stories this Week

He Won! He Won!


Remember last week when I told you that I was wishing Louis Kessler all the luck in the world with his invention to be debuted at the Innovation Summit on Friday at RootsTech 2017 in Salt Lake City???

He won!

His invention, which is called Double Match Triangulatorplaced third.

I communicated while him late on Friday, and he was “thrilled”.

He went on to say that “Apparently I'm the first Canadian to ever win a Showdown prize”, and he is right. He IS the first Canadian to win a place on the showdown!

So congratulations, Louis. We wait to hear more news about your invention, and your continued good luck!



#Ontario150 Twitter Campaign

The Archives of Ontario is always ahead of the latest news, and now, they are doing their share of getting their records on your computer and mobile devices by spotlighting people from Ontario in the next 150 days by Twitter.

So, the Archives of Ontario is counting down the 150 days until Ontario’s 150th birthday on July 1, 2017!

Like, re-tweet and follow our #Ontario150 Twitter Campaign @ArchivesOntario to see important people and moments from 1867 to the present, represented in our diverse collections.


Happy Valentine's Day, Everyone!!

Be sure to tell your friends about us.

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to genealogycanada@aol.com

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to www.elrs.biz.

The email is genealogyreserch@aol.com


(c)2017 All rights reserved.

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Crowsnest Museum and Archives, Alberta



The Crowsnest Museum and Archives first opened to the public in 1985, and since then, it has collected approximately 60,000 artifacts from the Crowsnest Pass area.

One thing that they do have is the Gushul Family Collection. This family were among the most prolific photographers of their time in Alberta. They opened a first photography studio in Bush Town in 1918 and a second in Blairmore in 1921.

The federal government has announced it is funding “the purchase of supplies and storage products to house and protect the Gushul Family Collection, a large and rare historical photograph collection that documents southern prairie life from the mid-1920s onwards. The Society will also conduct workshops for museum staff and local heritage organizations. This project will ensure long-term public access to artifacts in the museum's collection”. So that is good news!

To see the Gushul Images online, go to http://www.crowsnestmuseum.ca/gushul-images/
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SPECIAL OFFER!!!!!!!!!
 Need help in finding your ELUSIVE Canadian ancestors?

As a nod of the hat to the Ontario Genealogical Conference being held in Barrie, Ontario from May 29 to May 31, may we take this opportunity to offer a month-long discount on our research and consultation services of 15% (ends 11 June at midnight).

Just go to Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services at www.elrs.biz, or send an email with the subject "special" to genealogyresearch@aol.com to see how I can help you find that elusive Canadian ancestor!

Research Tip!  Read about the homestead act and research the records your ancestor has on file at the Library and Archives Canada at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/land/land-grants-western-canada-1870-1930/Pages/land-grants-western-canada.aspx
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Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/05/canadian-week-in-review-cwr-25-may-2015.html
 
It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada


 

Friday, February 20, 2015

Milo, Alberta Library Archives


The Milo Library Archives in Alberta has been working to put online their inventory of all historical documents.

There are plenty of descriptions of what has been done in the village over the years, including background information on groups like the Milo and District Agricultural Society, the Milo Ice Committee and the village newspaper called the Canopener.

News is that the efforts to continue digitizing and cataloguing the Milo and area history are ongoing. There are hopes to next tackle Milo area community organizations from Queenstown to Majorville, as well as schools and Lake McGregor.

You can visit www.albertaonrecord.ca/milo-library-archives to look through all the material that has been uploaded so far.

Congratulations to Milo for taking this iniatitive, and good luck in seeing this project through to the end.




Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/02/canadfian-news-in-review-16-february.html

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Saturday, January 31, 2015

Do you want to name a geographical feature in Alberta?


Alberta is looking for people who have a name for a geographical feature to get in contact with the people at the Alberta Geographical Names Program at http://culture.alberta.ca/heritage-and-museums/programs-and-services/historic-places-research-and-designation/geographical-names-program.

The Geographic Board of Canada was established in December 1897 as an assertion of Canada's sovereignty over its own geographical territory. By the 1970s, the responsibility for most geographical features had been transferred to the provinces.

The naming of features on land in Alberta administered by the federal government is a joint responsibility.

Final naming decisions are made by the Alberta Historical Resources Foundation and the Minister of Culture.

To find Canadian Geographical Names, you can go to http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/earth-sciences/geography/place-names/search/9170.

======

Check the Canadian Week in Review every Monday morning for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada.

If you missed this week’s edition, it is at http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2015/01/canadian-week-in-review-26-january-2015.html.

It’s the ONLY news blog of its kind in Canada!

It has been a regular post every Monday morning since April 23, 2012.

Monday, September 29, 2014

Canadian Week in Review - 29 September 2014



I have come across the following Canadian websites, social media items, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

History Week in Canada


In 1780, Benedict Arnold escaped one day after his treason came to light in what was to become the United States. Arnold, a major-general, and commander of the American Fort West Point, had planned to surrender the fort to the British. He became a colonel in the British army, and later lived in Saint John, New Brunswick. He then returned to England, where he died in 1801.

===================================================
In 1962, the "Garden of the Provinces" in Ottawa was opened by Prime Minister John Diefenbaker.

To read more about this park, that is opposite the Library and Archives Canada, go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_of_the_Provinces_and_Territories
===================================================


Social Media


(Blog) The Recipe Project
http://recipes.hypotheses.org/4378
Valarie J. Korinek is the author of this blog, and a Professor of Canadian History at the University of Saskatchewan.

Nova Scotia

Delegates visit area for N.S. Heritage Conference
http://www.ngnews.ca/News/Local/2014-09-23/article-3879913/Delegates-visit-area-for-N.S.-Heritage-Conference/1
Pictou County, Nova Scotia hosted the Nova Scotia Heritage Conference.

History-Ed Coleman: First World War humour in Hansford’s stories
http://www.novanewsnow.com/Opinion/Columnists/2014-09-21/article-3875711/History-Ed-Coleman%3A-First-World-War-humour-in-Hansford%26rsquo%3Bs-stories/1
Born in 1899, the former Wolfville barber, Cecil Hansford, was 16 when he joined the Canadian Army to fight in the First World War.

Lighthouse mural by Yarmouth artist an attraction for Nova Scotia visitors
http://www.kingscountynews.ca/News/Local/2014-09-23/article-3878832/Lighthouse-mural-by-Yarmouth-artist-an-attraction-for-Nova-Scotia-visitors/1
A Yarmouth artist has painted a mural of 144 Nova Scotia lighthouses that will meet everybody who takes the ferry from Maine to this Nova Scotian town.

New Brunswick

N.B.’s 104th finally gets its due
http://thechronicleherald.ca/books/1239446-nb-s-104th-finally-gets-its-due
Regiment’s War of 1812 efforts shown to be more than a footnote.

Quebec

The Treaty of Paris is in town
http://www.lifeinquebec.com/the-treaty-of-paris-is-in-town-10088/
Quebec City (Quebec) 23 September, 2014 – The Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years’ War between France Britain and Spain. The actual treaty, that was signed on February 10, 1763, is on display at the Musée de la Civilisation starting today, September 23 until October 2nd.

Ontario

Excerpt #6 – The First World War: Excerpts from the diary of Woodman Leonard
http://www.ottawasun.com/2014/09/25/the-first-world-war-excerpts-from-the-diary-of-woodman-leonard
For links to the other installments, visit last week's CWR post at -
http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2014/09/canadian-week-in-review-22-september.html

Canadian government joins 11th-hour search for John A. Macdonald’s precise birthplace
http://o.canada.com/news/canadian-government-joins-11th-hour-search-for-john-a-macdonalds-precise-birthplace
Barely 100 days before planned celebrations to mark the bicentennial of Sir John A. Macdonald’s birth in Glasgow, Scotland, the Canadian government has joined in an 11th-hour search for the precise birthplace of the country’s founding prime minister.

Science and Technology museum closed until 2015
http://www.ottawasun.com/2014/09/23/science-and-tech-museum-closed-until-2015
The Canada Science and Technology Museum will remain close until at least January 2015 because of mould.

Health unit looks back at its history
http://www.northernlife.ca/news/localNews/2014/09/22-sdhu-history-sudbury.aspx
A painstaking account of Sudbury's environmental history, going back to 1883, when Sudbury was only a Canadian Pacific Railway Outpost.

Here are the details on the RCAF’s new uniforms and ranks
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/here-are-the-details-on-the-rcafs-new-uniforms-and-ranks
The Royal Canadian Air Force’s (RCAF) new uniform respects the contributions and sacrifices of airmen and airwomen who served – and continue to serve – with pride and professionalism.

Afghanistan added to Tillsonburg's cenotaph, dedication ceremony planned Oct. 7
http://www.tillsonburgnews.com/2014/09/25/afghanistan-added-to-tillsonburgs-cenotaph-dedication-ceremony-planned-oct-7

Local residents are invited to a special dedication ceremony at the town cenotaph on Tuesday, October 7th to honour members of the International Security Assistance Force who served in Afghanistan.

Alberta

Can we save McKay Avenue School? Or is our history doomed to be history?
http://blogs.edmontonjournal.com/category/edmonton-commons/
McKay Avenue School, built in 1904, also played host to Alberta’s first legislative assemblies. Today, it’s a school museum, and on the endanger list to be torn down.


Alberta Aviation Museum receives historic air mail letter
The letter was part of the very first air mail delivery in Western Canada, flown from Calgary to Edmonton on July 9th, 1918 by Katherine Stinson, in an insubstantial wood and fabric aircraft.

Bison treaty signed by Alberta, Montana tribes
1st treaty among tribes and First Nations in the area since the 1800s
Native tribes from the U.S. and Canada signed a treaty Tuesday establishing an inter-tribal alliance to restore bison to areas of the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains where millions of the animals once roamed.


British Columbia 

Aboriginal tourism operator rebuked for opening burial boxes for travellers
http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/aboriginal-tourism-operator-rebuked-for-opening-burial-boxes-for-travellers-1.2774255
The actions of an aboriginal tourism operator in British Columbia who gave some travellers access to ancient burial boxes, including revealing the skeletal remains inside, have been condemned by his fellow First Nations.

Story of the Week




The society’s webpage is changing
(Editorial)

In years gone by, I used to go to a society’s website to see what was new with the organization, as well as its events,  latest publications, and their yearly executive.

There was so many changes I used to highlight it on my old news summary every week, and later, the Canadian Week in Review, but as time marched on, websites became less and less important, while on the other hand, the Member’s-Only webpages in the majority of a society’s website were becoming more important.

Then, about three years ago or so, the use of blogs by societies became the go-to media of choice for societies. But blogs quickly went out of style, mainly because they needed someone to look after them as people naturally graduated toward them. They needed someone to update them on a daily basis, and it became a hard job to find somebody within the society to take on that responsibility. And then Facebook came into the picture!

In a way, Facebook is their saving grace, because it can do everything that a webpage can do, plus it can add photos, videos, and other people can quickly comment on the posting, so it’s an "everybody" page. People have a feeling that the society belongs to them; whereas, the webpages and even blogs seemed somewhat distant, and there has to be a reason why only about 10% of the genealogy audience reads blogs, while as many as 70% read Facebook to see what is going on (according to a recent survey).

And now Google+ is making inroads on Facebook, although I believe that people are so used to Facebook now, it will be difficult to switch over to Google+. Most of the genealogists I know use Goggle+, along with a combination of Facebook, and yes, even blogs to keep up the date on genealogy news. And with the acquisition of YouTube, and video "Hang Outs", where you can actually listen to a person or people talk about one's favourite subject – Genealogy – it makes for a good combination.

So that is where I see genealogy going these days, until a new idea comes along.

How about you? Have you found that genealogy is cha
nging the way they get their word across to people? What have you experienced?

Let me know your thoughts, and I might post them in a future issue of CWR!

I can be reached at genealoygcanada@aol.com

Reminder: Check the Canadian Week in Review next Monday for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada. It’s theONLY news blog of its kind in country!

The next post will be on 06 October 2014.

Sunday, September 7, 2014

Edmonton City as Museum Project



The Edmonton City as Museum Project will tell the ‘stories of the people, places, and things’ that make up the city of Edmonton. 

So far, the site has explored the North Saskatchewan River, told the story of the Edmonton’s Pioneer Photographers, and they will host a special exhibit on Freedom this month. 

They would like you to recommend songs that will create a sense of freedom for the visitors to the exhibit. 

The songs will be compiled into the Freedom Playlist and will be shared in the exhibit and on line. 

The last day to submit is September 27, 2014 and the exhibit will take place on September 28th from 1 – 4 pm at the Prince of Wales Armoury. 

And they want your stories! So if you have a story to contribute, you can email them at 


Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Canada’s worst mine disaster

There will be an exhibit at the Provincial Archives of Alberta from now until May 31, 2014 and the exhibit is about Canada’s worst mine disaster at Hillcrest Collieries in Hillcrest, Alberta.

On June 19, 1914, 189 miners lost their lives at Hillcrest Collieries in what is still Canada's worst mine disaster. One hundred years later, the Provincial Archives of Alberta reconstructs the events at Hillcrest and their impact on this coal mining community by highlighting important archival documents preserved within its holdings.

Visit the Provincial Archives of Alberta during regular facility hours to view this commemorative centennial exhibit, and the admission is free.

The Provincial Archives of Alberta is located at 8555 Roper Road, Edmonton, Alberta. 

They have a new website and it is at http://provincialarchives.alberta.ca 

Here is a report on the disaster in the Cranbook Herald at http://www.crowsnest.bc.ca/hillcrest.html

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

UPDATE: Canada GenWeb Updates Cemeteries

The following cemeteries have been updated in Alberta, Manitoba, and Prince Edward Island -

ALBERTA

Beaver:
- Kinsella God's Acre Cemetery

Edmonton:
- Westlawn Memorial Gardens & Edmonton Crematorium

Smoky Lake:
- Victoria Park Cemetery

MANITOBA

Armstrong RM:
- Immaculate Heart of Mary Roman Catholic Cemetery

Emerson Town:
- Emerson Cemetery

Franklin RM:
- Friedensthal Lutheran Cemetery
- Ridgeville / South Ridge Cemetery

Rhineland RM:
- Rosenfeld Village & District Community Cemetery

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Queen's County:
- North Wiltshire United Cemetery

All on the cemeteries on Canada GenWeb have been indexed and photographed by volunteers.

Pass along your thanks to Patricia Green & Marilyn Whiting for their help indexing. And to Olga Steinke, Cheyenne Kepke, Patricia Green, Marilyn Whiting, Jim Spence, and Elizabeth Warwick for their photographs.


Thursday, April 18, 2013

GENWEB UPDATE: Alberta, Quebec, and Ontario Cemeteries


The Canadian GenWeb has issued an update to the Alberta, Quebec, and Ontario cemeteries as follows -

ALBERTA

Lacombe:

-  Bentley Cemetery

QUEBEC

Huntingdon County:

- Tallen Family Burial Ground

ONTARIO

Brant County:

- Farringdon Cemetery

- Mount Hope Cemetery

Bruce County:

- Douglas Hill Cemetery

- Queen Hill Cemetery

Elgin County:

- St Thomas Cemetery

Essex County:

- Victoria Memorial Gardens

Grey County:

- Cookes Presbyterian / Orange Valley Presbyterian / Old Presbyterian Cemetery

- Mennonite Brethren In Christ Cemetery

Lambton County:

- Hillsdale Cemetery

- Point Edward Veterans Memorial Park

Manitoulin District:

- Michael Bay Cemetery

Norfolk County:

- Barton Family Cemetery

- Bethel Brethern in Christ / Tunkard Cemetery

Peel County:

- Brampton Pioneer / Harrison-Hewgill Pioneer Cemetery

- Cheyne Cemetery

Simcoe County:

- St Mary's Catholic Cemetery

Wellington County:

- Abandoned / Old Anglican Cemetery

The Canada GenWeb have given it thanks to Alison Mitchell-Reid, Anne Chamberlain, Bonnie Lee Breadner, Brenda Marchese, Giselle Loder, Jim Anderson, Joanne Krywko, Kate Ford, Marilyn Whiting, Nancy Ross-Hill, Sharon Mattiuz, Tom Thompson, and William Cooke for help indexing, and to Alison Mitchell-Reid, Anne Chamberlain, Bonnie Lee Breadner, Carolyn Bechtel, Doug Tracey, Joanne Krywko, Kate Ford, Linda Doran, Marilyn Mallet, Nancy Ross-Hill, Penny Gallagher, Pete Carell, Sharon Mattiuz, Thomas Rowe, and William Cooke for photos of the cemeteries.

To view the site, go to http://canadacems.blogspot.com/2013/04/alberta-quebec-ontario-update.html

Sunday, March 24, 2013

The Nova Scotia Genealogist Fall 2012 Issue




This will probably be the last printed The Novas Scotia Genealogist, as they are going to electronic newsletter shortly.

In this issue, they have Immigrants and Newcomers Married at St Johns Church, Lunenburg, 1817-1851 by Terry Punch. The church was founded in 1753, and is an Anglican Church.

There have been additions to the 42 marriages that were put on index cards by Heather Long. The additions include children who were baptised in the church.

Andrew White the Planter – an Update by W. Warner to an article submitted in 2011, in which he discussed the problem between Andrew White of Sudbury, Massachusetts and Andrew White of Marshfield, Massachusetts. Who was the Planter in Nova Scotia?

The writer disproves through the Massachusetts Archives that Andrew White of Marshfield was not the Planter who settled in the Annapolis Valley.

The third article in the newsletter is The Hillcrest Mine Disaster and the Nova Scotia Connection by M. Bole .

The mining disaster occurred in Hillcrest, Alberta, and 189 miners were killed in 1914. Twenty-three miners were from Nova Scotia and the author gives a brief history of each of the minters.

The names of the miners were –

BARBER, James (Barbour)

BAINBRIDGE, Sidney H.

BINGHAM, Frederick Seymour

EMERY, David

GREY, James F.

HOOD, John

HUNTER, Hugh

JOHNSTON, Alfred and William

McISAAC, Roderick

McKAY, Angus H.

McKINNON, John B.

McKINNPON, Stephen

McNEIL, Pius

McQUARRIE, John A.

MEGENCY, Nicholas (Megeney)

MOORHOUSE, Frederick (Moorehouse, Muirhouse)

NEATH, William Henry

QUIGLEY, James S.

QUIGLEY, Thomas

ROBERTSON, George

WALKER, John (Donald John)

WALLACE, Rod

The writer has three other name of miners who may hace spent time in Nova Scotia, and they are Frank Bostock, Prosper Days, John Pearson, and she needs information on the following – August Fougere, William Miller, and William G. Miller.

The website for GANS is http://www.NovaScotiaAncestors.ca

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Newspaper Records of Births, Marriages and Deaths

The people at Alberta Family History Society have added more information to their BMD newspaper records. There is a total of 31,500 newspaper records to search. This database is growing all the time so check back regularly.

The newspaper that the BMD are taken from are the Calgary Herald, Calgary Herald Daily, Calgary Herald Weekly, and The Albertan.

The people at the Alberta Family History Society have put the Last and First Names, Event, Location, Date, Notes, Name of the Paper, Publication Date, and Page in the index.

You can go to www.afhs.ab.ca/data/bmd/search.php

Meanwhile, word has reached us that the Alberta Genealogical Society is currently redesigning the AGS home page. No date of when it will be finished, but you can still go to the home page at http://abgensoc.ca

Sunday, February 24, 2013

UPDATE: Alberta, Manitoba & Saskatchewan Cemeteries

GenWeb Canada has put on the following updates –

ALBERTA

Barrhead:

- St Anne Roman Catholic Cemetery

Ponoka:

- Bismark Lutheran Cemetery

MANITOBA

Brokenhead RM:

- St Mary's Roman Catholic Cemetery

Lansdowne RM:

- Arden Cemetery

Westbourne RM:

- Gladstone Cemetery

Winnipeg City:

- Chapel Lawn Memorial Gardens

SASKATCHEWAN

Birch Hills RM:

- Holy Trinity Cemetery

Corman Park RM:

- First Saskatchewan Cemetery

- Kirilowka Cemetery

- Memorial Cemetery

Insinger RM:

- Theodore Cemetery

Torch River RM:

- Corner Lake Cemetery

To go to the above cemeteries, click on to
http://canadacems.blogspot.ca/2013/02/alberta-manitoba-saskatchewan-update.html

GenWeg Canada recognizes the following people, who do this work for free. They are Flora Stewart, Patricia Green and Julia Adamson for their help indexing. Flora Stewart, George Fedyck, Gloria MacDonald, Gordon Neish, Linda Doran, Patricia Green, Roy Hermanson, and Wayne Sys for photos.

Friday, January 11, 2013

Is Your Conference Listed on Conference Keepers?

Jen Baldwin of the website Ancestral Journeys of Colorado has a website that is offering to list your conference (for FREE).

I checked the International Conference site to see if there were any Canadian Conference, and there are conferences there for British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, and Manitoba.

To have your Conference listed, you can connect Jen by filling out a contact page at http://conferencekeeper.weebly.com/contact-us.html

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Relatively Speaking

The newsletter of the Alberta Genealogical Society headquartered in Edmonton, Alberta, has over 10 indexes of their newsletter "Relatively Speaking" online.

You can search their individual indexes to the newsletter, with issues starting online at 2004. There is also a summary of the newsletter, and supplements such as Bylaw Changes, AGM 2012, and Policy Changes.

The full issue of the newsletter itself is available at the Member’s Only website online at www.abgensoc.ca.

Moreover, they have great news!

The 40th Anniversary will be held next year, in 2013, in Edmonton. It will be celebrated at the Alberta Genealogical Society, Conference 2013, to be held April 20 & 21, 2013,

The website is www.abgensoc.ca.

The blog about the conference is at www.abgensoc.ca/AGSConference2013.jpg

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

New Digital Family History Books

An update to the list of digital books that FamilySearh.org is putting online has just been released.

They have added 1,200 family history books to the list reports Nathan W. Murphy in his blog, during the month of July. These books are now accessible to everyone for free at Family History Books.

In addition to 700+ family genealogies, right now they have United States and Canada Books, British Isles Books, Compiled Genealogy Books, and International Books.

I checked and there are book on Alberta, and on the Red River Settlement in the United States and Canada Books section.

Go to their website at https://familysearch.org/blog/en/digital-family-history-b

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

French-Canadian Societies


Marc-Amable Girard (1822–1892) was the second Premier of the Western Canadian province of Manitoba, and the first Franco-Manitoban to hold that post.

There are lots of French-Canadian societies in Quebec, but did you know that there are French-Canadian societies in other parts of Canada? French-Canadians—as they expanded westward across Canada—settled in villages, towns, and cities in Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta.

Ontario

In the 2006 Canadian census, there were 488,815 French-Canadians in Ontario. They make up 4.1 per cent of the province's total population.

They are mainly concentrated in Eastern Ontario (in the cities of Ottawa, Cornwall, and towns in-between), Northeastern Ontario (in the cities of Sudbury, North Bay, and Timmins), and in Toronto, Windsor, Penetanguishene, and Welland.

There is Le Réseau du patrimoine franco-ontarien (RPFO) at http://rpfo.ca. This is a collection of over 30 French-Canadian societies in Ontario. Some sites are bilingual(F/E), while others are strictly in French, but they all have good information.

Manotiba

The majority of Franco-Manitobans (about 90%) live in the Greater Winnipeg area. There are Franco-Manitoban centres in Notre-Dame-de-Lourdes, St. Claude, St. Pierre-Jolys, Ste. Anne, Ste. Rose du Lac, La Broquerie, Lorette, St. Laurent, Somerset, and St-Lazare.

The Manitoba Genealogical Society www.mbgenealogy.com covers all linguist groups in the province.

There is also The Manitoba Historical Society at www.mhs.mb.ca, and the Centre du patrimoine, Société historique de Saint-Boniface at http://shsb.mb.ca in which you can access the library database (in French), and the Voyageur contracts database (in French).

Saskatchewan

French-Canadians make up about 2 per cent of the population of Saskatchewan, and live in the cities of Regina, Saskatoon, Prince Albert, and Moose Jaw. They also live in small towns such as Gravelbourg, Albertville, Duck Lake, Ponteix, Zenon Park, and Bellegarde.

Saskatchewan Genealogical Society www.saskgenealogy.com This society has 20 branches throughout the province, and covers the many peoples (including the French-Canadians) who settled there. Also, check La Société historique de la Saskatchewan at www.societehisto.com They have many published books such as La trace des pionniers, and offer a quarterly journal.

Alberta

The French-Canadians are centered in the Bonnie Doon area of Edmonton, in the towns of Bonnyville, Plamondon, and St. Paul in the northeast, and in the settlements of St. Isidore and the Municipal District of Smoky River No. 130, including the towns of Falher, Donnelly, McLennan, and Girouxville, as well as in north-central Alberta.

La Société généalogique du Nord-Ouest www.sgno.ca is located in Edmonton, and they have been a society since 1991. They have a very inclusive research library.

Tomorrow Post: Canadian Archival Societies

Wednesday, October 5, 2011

The Leduc Genealogy Club

The Leduc Rep, the online newspaper which serves the town, has a story in it that the Leduc Genealogy Club is asking the city to preserve it's history by looking out for the cemeteries that are in the city.

the Group says that the cemeteries have trees and weeds growing out of -- in the summer, and now it is clear that the grave are stating to sick into the ground.

Read about what the city father's said when this was brought to their attention last month http://www.leducrep.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3290214