Showing posts with label history. Show all posts
Showing posts with label history. Show all posts

Friday, July 1, 2016

Happy Canada Day!!!



Next year will be the 150th birthday of Canada, and we will all celebrate it in our own way, but celebrate we will. Are you starting to plan your Canadian vacation for next year? There are so many places we can choose from - each province has its own historical significance.

One thing we can think about attending now are the genealogical and historical conferences that will be held in 2016. Be sure to keep your eyes open for them!

So happy birthday to us, and we will see you next year as you travel across our country!

Monday, June 27, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 27 June 2016



I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

O Canada 
In 1880, “O Canada,” the future Canadian national anthem, was first performed in Quebec City, Quebec. The music had been written in 1880 for St-Jean-Baptist Day, and the lyrics were originally in French, and English version was created in 1906. 

Canada kept the British anthem until 1967, when it was adopted as the national anthem. 

To read more about the anthem, go to http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/o-canada/ 


Social Media 

(Audio) The battle of Vimy- continued in Montreal 


A small greenspace in Montreal, Parc de Vimy (Vimy Park) has become a national issue as city council plans to rename the space after controversial politician Jacques Parizeau 

Newspaper Articles 

Newfoundland and Labrador 

Letter: Give the Beothucks their day 


One of our Province’s statutory holidays is Discovery Day (June 24). It is a commemoration of John’s Cabot’s “discovery” of Newfoundland in 1497. The claim that Cabot discovered this island is problematic. There is no clear documented evidence that he actually came here and even if he did, he was far from the first. 

Prince Edward Island 

P.E.I. museum launches WWI exhibit 


P.E.I.'s Regiment Museum launched a new exhibit in Charlottetown on Saturday. 

The exhibit, called Rally Round the Flag — PEI and the Great War, features photos, artifacts and stories from all the units that served overseas, including nurses, navy and the air force. 

New tourism website maps out culture trail for Island visitors 

Visitors to the Island can better plan their experiences with the help of a new website from PEI Arts and Heritage Trail. 


Nova Scotia 

Monument honouring women a first for Halifax: 'This is a big deal' 


Of the 280 statues in Halifax, fewer than a dozen show women — and virtually all of them are mythical figures, such as fairies and nymphs.That is about to change: A project to recognize the contribution to Canada of real women took a leap forward on Friday 

Polish Church to reopen Sunday 


St. Mary's Polish Church in Whitney Pier, Cape Breton, has risen from the ashes following a spectacular fire that burned the 100-year-old building to the ground in November 2014. 

The doors of the newly rebuilt church will reopen to the community during an open house on Sunday 

New Brunswick 

Sisters meet for first time at Fredericton Airport 


"You're just like me!" exclaimed Sharon Rein, as she and her sister Sharon Dennis held each other for the first time. 

It was an airport moment 56 years in the making. 

With the help of an amateur genealogist and a Facebook group, the biological sisters — who share a first name — spoke on the phone for the first time earlier this year. 

Campsite dating back 12,000 years unearthed by Route 8 


Archaeologists say a campsite unearthed just metres from a new highway in Fredericton could be more than 12,000 years old. 
                                                                 
The campsite includes a fire pit, which was determined by the presence of charcoal. 

Quebec 

Quebec National Assembly to get a $60-million makeover 


The historic monument, designed by Eugène-Étienne Taché in the 1800s, is getting an unprecedented $60.5 million makeover. 

The project is ambitious: to build a 3,800-square-metre underground reception pavilion, just outside the main building, and expand facilities underneath the inner courtyard. Two additional parliamentary committee rooms are being built. 

Ontario 

Canadian shipwrecks on display at the Peterborough Museum and Archives 


An exhibition of shipwrecks has landed at the Peterborough Museum and Archives until September, giving the community the chance to learn the tragic stories of vessels of all sizes, torn apart in Canadian waters. 

CN Tower at 40: Still a magnet for Toronto photographers 


Look up. Look way up — 553.33 metres up to be exact, the crown jewel of Toronto's skyline. 

For a while there, it was the world's tallest freestanding structure and tallest tower. 

Tory MP calls on government to apologize for St. Louis 


An Alberta opposition MP is calling on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to formally apologize on behalf of the government of Canada for turning away Jewish refugees on board the ocean liner St. Louis in 1939. 

Smiths Falls, Ont., funeral business dissolves the dead into the town's sewers 


Waterworks officials in Smiths Falls, Ont., are monitoring a funeral company that's become the first in Ontario to use an alkaline solution to dissolve the bodies of the dead — and then drain the leftover coffee-coloured effluents into the town's sewer system. 

Island has unique heritage 


About 35 kilometres southwest of Kingston in Lake Ontario, the island was out of view of the prying eyes of prohibition authorities. "It is almost directly north of the city of Oswego, making it an ideal spot for smugglers," said C.W. Hunt in Booze, Boats, and Billions: Smuggling Liquid Gold (McClelland and Stewart, Toronto 1988). "It was here that the rum-runners would lay over, waiting for darkness or better weather before making their dash for the American shore." 

Ajax seeks historic designation for munitions plant 


The Town is seeking a historic designation for the former Defence Industries Limited (DIL) munitions plant. 

Ajax is applying for a National Historic Event, though the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada (HSMBC). 

Three students compete at Ontario Provincial Heritage Fair 


Winners from the recent Kenjgewin Teg Regional Heritage Fair, representing two Manitoulin area schools, travelled to the University of Toronto recently to share their projects at the provincial level. 

Manitoba 

Street names tell stories of neighbourhood 


Names on the doorways of museums or universities often tell who has donated money or supplies to the institution. On street signs, names tell a different story. 

Manitoba celebrates National Aboriginal Day 


For the 20th year in a row, Manitoba is celebrating National Aboriginal Day with festivities throughout the province that honour the culture, heritage and achievements of Canada’s First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples.

British Columbia 

B.C. demands return of First Nations artifacts 


The province is calling on museums and institutions from around the world to give back artifacts and 'treasures' from British Columbia First Nations. 

Over hundreds of years, items including grave goods, ceremonial regalia, masks and pieces of arts have found their way out of B.C. and into museums and private collections around the world. 

Aboriginal 

Why is First Nations oral history embracing voice, video and paper? 


For centuries, First Nations people recounted the cultures’ histories orally. With decreasing use of traditional languages, the art of oral history is looking to film, audio and paper methods to pass the history on to younger generations. 

North 

New Heritage Minute explores dark history of Indian residential schools 


Making its premiere on National Aboriginal Day, Historica Canada's newest Heritage Minute explores the dark history of Indian residential schools and their lasting effects on Indigenous people. 

Goodbye Great Slave Lake? Movement to decolonize N.W.T. maps is growing 


Behind every name there is a history that moulds a collective consciousness, a narrative that transcends time and ties people to the land and for many, to their ancestors. 

WW I hero Francis Pegahmagabow given Aboriginal Day honour 


His Ojibway name was Binaaswi, translating roughly to "the wind that blows off." 

How apposite it is, then, that a hard wind was blowing off the choppy waters of Ontario's Georgian Bay when the most decorated Indigenous soldier in Canada's history was finally given an honour befitting his story. 

History largely remembers him as Corp. Francis Pegahmagabow — the deadliest sniper and scout of the First World War, credited with 378 kills and 300 captures. 

Canadian Stories this Week 

Users give Library and Archives Canada low marks for public access to collection 

I don't entirely agree with this survey, and the reason I don't agree is that I think the service has improved. It got so bad a couple of years ago, you felt the negative vibes as soon as you would walk in there. But now, the attitude is a lot brighter, and you feel happier when you walk into there – it's all better. 

So to read that people still feel there isn't enough public access, I don't think I agree with that. True, I think they could do a better job on the microfilm that has been digitized and put on Heritage.com, like further explanation, but it can still be worked with – even though it could stand more publicity. 


DPLA and FamilySearch Partner to Expand Access to Digitized Historic Books Online 

FamilySearch International is on the move again – they have partnered with the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), “the largest genealogy organization in the world, have signed an agreement that will expand access to FamilySearch.org’s growing free digital historical book collection”. 

They also say that “this new partnership, DPLA will incorporate metadata from FamilySearch.org’s online digital book collection that will make more than 200,000 family history books discoverable through DPLA’s search portal later this year. From DPLA, users will be able to access the free, fully viewable digital books on FamilySearch.org”.  

And don't forget, check them often to see the latest books which have been advertised. 


And Ancestry.ca has put on the Canada Homestead Grant Registers, 1892-1930.
They have put the register books online ONLY, not the actual land grant. The archives still has the index and you can still write for the land grant (for a fee), to the archives, Ancestry.ca has just put on the index book.

They have put on With 668,623 records and 78,794 images, Ancestry users can learn about some of Canada’s earliest settlers such as applicants’ names, region, date of application and homestead fee paid. 

The Canada Homestead Grant Registers 1892-1930 Collection is now available on Ancestry at: http://search.ancestry.ca/search/db.aspx?dbid=9209 

And that was the week in Canadian news! 

This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012! 

Be sure to tell your friends about us. 

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to genealogycanada@aol.com 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe 

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go towww.elrs.biz 

(c)2016 All rights reserved.

Monday, June 20, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 20 June 2016


I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

Louis Riel 

In 1884, Louis Riel left a teaching post in Montana for Canada to lead what was to become the Northwest Rebellion. He had been teaching at the Catholic mission of St. Peter's on the Sun River for about a year, but the job paid poorly and he didn't have time to pursue such interests as politics. 






Barry Morse

In 1918, actor Barry Morse was born in London, Ontario. With his Canadian-born wife, he moved to Canada during the early 1950s from England. He is best remembered as Lieut. Philip Gerard in TV's "The Fugitive." He died in February, 2008.

For more information, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barry_Morse






Social Media 

Author runs across Quebec & Ontario to honour Irish heritage 


The United Irish Societies of Montreal and the Montreal Irish Memorial Park Foundation, Inc. got a big boost Friday as they try to build a park to remember their ancestors who died of typhus. 

Award-winning Irish author Michael Collins arrived at the Black Rock in Griffintown as part of his 900-kilometre marathon 

This Week in Hants History 


Here's a look at what was making the news 35 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal. 

Newspaper Articles 

Newfoundland and Labador 

Two Memorial students bound for First World War battlefields 


Two Memorial University students are set to walk in the footsteps of the bold young men who blazed a trail 100 years ago in Europe.

Prince Edward Island 

Souris heritage home may get a face lift 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/souris-heritage-home-1.3630249

A historic house in Souris could be on its way to a new life. The house at 57 Main Street is know as the old Leard house.

It`s up for sale and a local, Brian Deveau, would love to see the history of it preserved.

Nova Scotia  

Dedication highlights history of two islands 

http://www.ngnews.ca/News/Local/2016-06-10/article-4556342/Dedication-highlights-history-of-two-islands/1

Pictou County native John Ashton, Nova Scotia Representative for the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, was a guest speaker recently at the unveiling of a plaque Commemorating the National Historic Significance of Deadman’s Island and Melville Island.

2016 Tattoo lineup mixes old favourites with exciting new additions 

http://thechronicleherald.ca/other/1371768-2016-tattoo-lineup-mixes-old-favourites-with-exciting-new-additions

For the first time in two decades, a serving United States Military group will perform at the Royal Nova Scotia International Tattoo this year, when the United States Air Force Honor Guard Drill Team brings its skills to Halifax.

Quebec 

Daytripping: Quebec Hwy. 148 to Saint-Andrews 

http://ottawacitizen.com/travel/daytripping-quebec-hwy-148-to-saint-andresaxo

Crossing from Ontario to Quebec via the Cumberland ferry ($10 for a car), we drove east along Hwy. 148, which stretches along the north shore of the Ottawa River from the Pontiac to the Montreal suburb of Laval

'An insult': Vimy Park to be renamed for separatist premier Parizeau  

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/an-insult-vimy-park-to-be-renamed-for-separatist-premier-parizeau-1.2949317

A Montreal borough's plan to pay tribute to late sovereigntist premier Jacques Parizeau by changing the name of a park that currently honours Vimy Ridge is being blasted by some critics as disrespectful to Canada's war history

Ontario 

Simcoe County history 

http://www.orilliapacket.com/2016/06/17/simcoe-county-history

Many young men would have been satisfied with life as a successful businessman in a small town.

Thomas H. Best was not one of them.

Grays and Blues add a splash of colour to Lost Villages 

http://www.cornwallseawaynews.com/News/2016-06-12/article-4557258/Grays-and-Blues-add-a-splash-of-colour-to-Lost-Villages/1

A renowned military re-enactment organization and a local heritage site have joined forces to preserve the memory of thousands of soldiers.

City celebrates 175 years of being Canada’s ‘First Capital’ with a variety of events  

http://www.kingstonregion.com/whatson-story/6721609-city-celebrates-175-years-of-being-canada-s-first-capital-with-a-variety-of-events/

On June 15, 1841, Kingston was named capital of the Union of the Canadas, the precursor to what would become the nation of Canada 26 years later; now 175 years later, the city is celebrating its roots and the unique history of both Kingston and Canada with a variety of history-focused events.

How a rare Superman sketch arrived at the Ontario Jewish Archives 

http://www.cjnews.com/culture/arts/shu-lou-became-wayne-shuster

Several years ago, OJA archivist Donna Bernardo-Ceriz was flipping through the newly acquired scrapbooks when she spotted a drawing of a caped superhero with the initials “BSR” – Beta Sigma Rho – emblazoned on his chest. The drawing was signed by Joe Shuster, the Toronto-born artist who, with Jerry Siegel, created the legendary Superman comics as published by DC Comics in the United States, beginning about 1938.

Manitoba 

Manitoba Métis mark 200 years since the Battle of Seven Oaks 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/200-years-since-battle-of-seven-oaks-1.3641997

This weekend marked 200 years since the Métis flag's infinity symbol waved over Frog Plain in a confrontation that would go down in Canadian history.

Iconic Royal Bank 'ghost sign' to be completely covered by college

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/iconic-royal-bank-sign-1.3635761

An iconic ghost sign in downtown Winnipeg is about to disappear. 

The faded blue Royal Bank of Canada sign at the top of the Union Bank Building in the Exchange District will soon be replaced with a sign for the Paterson GlobalFoods Institute at Red River College.

Alberta

Alberta’s farming heritage celebrated 

http://lethbridgeherald.com/news/local-news/2016/06/11/albertas-farming-heritage-celebrated/

Alberta was built on the backs of farmers and ranchers, and Farmer’s Day is an annual opportunity to celebrate that heritage

Saskatchewan 

Saskatoon civic pancake breakfast history dates back to Pioneer Days 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/saskatoon-civic-pancake-breakfast-1.3638720

It's a breakfast with a history.

For the past four decades, local politicians, police, fire fighters and celebrities put on the white hats, stepped behind the big griddle and flipped flapjacks at the civic pancake breakfast

British Columbia

Vancouver Italian culture and food on display in June 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/italian-heritage-month-vancouver-1.3633652

If you were anywhere near Vancouver's Commercial Drive Sunday, you probably already know: June is Italian Heritage Month across Canada

North 

'You see time pass by': Archivists reuniting Yellowknifers with old photos 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/nwt-archives-portrait-photos-1.3629914

Archivists in Yellowknife have spent two years sifting through almost 60,000 portraits, in order to reunite them with their rightful owners.

The photos were taken by photographers at the city's Reimann Studio, later known as Yellowknife Photo, and were donated to the NWT Archives in 2008.

Go to http://nwtarchives.ca/ykphotoclaim.asp

Canadian Stories this Week 

The Canadian Week in Review received three press releases this week -

The genealogy of Acadian families of Prince Edward Island, c. 1764 to c. 1900


The public is invited to the launch of Volume VII: R – W, the last volume of the series on the genealogy of Acadian families of Prince Edward Island, c. 1764 to c. 1900, by historian-genealogist Mr. Jean Bernard. The launch will be held at the Acadian Museum of P.E.I., in Miscouche, on Thursday, June 23, at 7:00 p.m.

This book includes 325 pages on the genealogy of Island Acadian family names beginning with the letters R - W, such as Richard, Thériault, Thibodeau, and Waite. Although mainly in French, the volume includes translations in English of all the key words and abbreviations used, thus making it user-friendly for English-speaking researchers.

The public is invited to come and meet the author, and to benefit of a book discount on the evening of the launch. There will be background music with fiddler Louise Arsenault accompanied by Jonathan Arsenault. Refreshments will be served.

For more information, Mr. Jean Bernard can be contacted by email at
jeanbernard61@hotmail.com

Library and Archives Canada Announces $1.5 million in Funding to Help Local Communities Preserve Canada's Documentary Heritage


 Library and Archives Canada (LAC) program will provide $1.5 million in funding to 40 projects led by archives, libraries and heritage institutions across Canada. The announcement of the recipients of this second cycle of the Documentary Heritage Communities Program (DHCP) was made today at the annual meeting of the Association des archivistes du Quebec held in Quebec City from June 13 to 15.

The DHCP was created in 2015 to provide financial assistance for activities that augment the visibility of and access to materials held by Canada's local documentary heritage institutions. It also aims to increase the capacity of local institutions to sustainably preserve, promote and showcase the country's documentary heritage. The DHCP provides contributions to eligible applicants across Canada for a variety of projects that will also allow citizens to access and engage with their nation's history like never before.

Funded projects from Quebec are:

-- Celanese: A Last Salvage (Societe d'histoire de Drummond),
Drummondville;

-- Fonds and Collection Description and Management of Archival Services on
Servers and Management Software (Centre d'archives regional des Iles),
Iles-de-la-Madeleine;

-- Preservation by Technological Transfer and Promotion of the Multimedia
Document Collection of the Lanaudiere Archives (Corporation du centre
regional d'archives de Lanaudiere), L'Assomption;

-- 75,000 Pages of History (McCord Museum), Montreal;

-- Di Folks Archiv / People's Archive (Jewish Public Library Archives),
Montreal;

-- Statistical portrait of Quebec Archival Centres and Services - Phase 2
(Reseau des archives du Quebec), Montreal;

-- Creating a Professional Development Program - Phase 2 (Association des
archivistes du Quebec), Quebec;

-- The Litery and Historical Society of Quebec Transactions: The
Intellectual Heritage of Quebec's English-Speaking Community (Literary
and Historical Society of Quebec), Quebec;

-- Archives and Heritage: A Vast Laboratory (Musee regional de Rimouski),
Rimouski;

-- A Living Past: Promoting and Preserving the Archival Legacy of Yvette
Seguin-Theriault and the Families of Ripon (Comite du patrimoine de
Ripon), Ripon.

The deadline to apply for the next funding cycle (2017-18) is January
27, 2017.

Consult the list of the 2016-2017 recipients from Quebec and other provinces and territories: http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/services/documentary-heritage-communities-program/Pages/funding-history-2016-2017.aspx.

Digitization of the Canadian Expeditionary Force Personnel Service Files – Update of June 2016 

As of today, 297,013 of 640,000 files are available online via our Soldiers of the First World War: 1914-1918 database.

Library and Archives Canada is digitizing the service files systematically, from box 1 to box 10686, which roughly corresponds to alphabetical order. Please note that over the years, the content of some boxes has had to be moved and, you might find that the file you want, with a surname that is supposed to have been digitized, is now located in another box that has not yet been digitized. So far, we have digitized the following files:

Latest box digitized: Box 5003 and Karpuk.

Please check the database regularly for new additions and if you still have questions after checking the database, you may contact us directly at 1-866-578-7777 for more assistance.

Go to https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/first-world-war-1914-1918-cef/Pages/canadian-expeditionary-force.aspx

And that was the week in Canadian news!

This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012!

Be sure to tell your friends about us.

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to genealogycanada@aol.com

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go towww.elrs.biz

(c)2016 All rights reserved.

Monday, June 13, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 13 June 2016


I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too. 

Social Media 

(Partly Audio) Tree-ring expert uses attic beams to date historic Sackville homes 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/ben-phillips-tantramar-heritage-sackville-1.3614284 

Conservation biologist Ben Phillips has been spending a lot of time lately in dusty attics and dank basements in the Sackville area. 

(Photos) Town commemorates 150th anniversary of the Battle of Ridgeway 

http://www.forterietimes.ca/2016/06/04/town-commemorates-150th-anniversary-of-the-battle-of-ridgeway 

The community came together Saturday to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Ridgeway. 

The event is considered to be one of the defining battles in Canada history. 

(Video) Royal Newfoundland Regiment Museum opens at CFS St. John's 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/royal-newfoundland-regiment-museum-opens-1.3621764 

Lines of faded military uniforms and memorabilia related to the Royal Newfoundland Regiment were unveiled at a new museum in Pleasantville in St. John's Wednesday. 

Newspaper Articles 

Newfoundland and Labrador 

Remote Sensing Satellite Uncovers Astonishing New Evidence of Viking Presence in Newfoundland, Canada 

http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/remote-sensing-satellite-uncovers-astonishing-new-evidence-viking-presence-020860#sthash.VWzpAdOe.dpuf

Read about William James Veall, and his work on the 'Stream Drift Chart', and his belief that “voyagers from Greenland to Newfoundland almost certainly made use of the Labrador Current which, when ocean currents were favorable, would drift them past the very rugged and somewhat inaccessible rocky coastline of northern Newfoundland right into the mouth of the more peaceful Gulf of St. Lawrence”. 

Elliston-based Great War committee to bury time capsule for 100th anniversary commemoration 

http://www.thepacket.ca/News/Local/2016-06-09/article-4552133/Elliston-based-Great-War-committee-to-bury-time-capsule-for-100th-anniversary-commemoration/1 

With the 100th anniversary of the battle of Beaumont Hamel in the First World War on July 1, a local war commemoration committee is looking to remember the event by creating some history of their own. 

Nova Scotia 

Viola Desmond family documents donated to Beaton Institute 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/viola-desmond-wanda-robson-beaton-institute-archives-documents-1.3620481 

The youngest sister of Canadian civil rights icon Viola Desmond has donated her collection of family documents to the Beaton Institute of Cape Breton University. 

New Brunswick 

Phenomenal war exhibit on display in Oromocto 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/nb-oromocto-war-display-1.3617313 

A new display has opened at the New Brunswick Military History Museum in Oromocto, just ahead of the 72nd anniversary of D-Day. 

From Vimy to D-Day is travelling across the country to highlight Canada's involvement in both World Wars. 

Ontario 

JOY OF GENEALOGY: Newspapers can provide surprising family stories 

http://www.insidetoronto.com/news-story/6706232-joy-of-genealogy-newspapers-can-provide-surprising-family-stories/ 

Genealogists seem to forget or simply ignore newspapers as a great source of knowledge. 

The R.B. Bennett statue is in town. Let's get it to Parliament Hill 

http://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/columnists/boyko-the-r-b-bennett-statue-is-in-town-lets-get-it-to-parliament-hill 

Bennett was an engaged citizen. He was a city councillor, territorial representative, a member of Alberta’s provincial legislature, then founding leader of the Alberta Conservative Party. He won a federal seat and served in Robert Borden’s cabinet. In 1927 he became leader of the federal Tories and, in 1930, Canada’s prime minister. 

Corduroy road likely one of Waterloo's first-ever European built roads 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener-waterloo/corduroy-road-represents-waterloos-early-beginings-1.3516984 

A corduroy road unearthed by construction crews on King Street in Uptown Waterloo dates back two centuries and is likely one of the first ever roads built by Euro-Canadian settlers in the region, according to a senior archaeologist. 

Saskatchewan 

History Matters: Metis once not counted in census 

http://thestarphoenix.com/opinion/columnists/history-matters-metis-once-not-counted-in-census 

It’s census time again. Statistics Canada is counting heads, as well as gathering other information that will be invaluable for planning and future genealogical historical research.

British Columbia 

In defence of history: Fred Soofi's crusade to save Port Moody's old homes 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/in-defence-of-history-fred-soofi-s-crusade-to-save-port-moody-s-old-homes-1.3618146 

The arrival of the Evergreen SkyTrain line and accompanying condo boom means an uncertain future for many of Port Moody's historical homes. 

Canadian Stories this Week 

New Courses on Ancestry Academy


Do you know that the Ancestry Academy’s online course library continues to grow? Not only do they have four new full-length courses, but they have added a variety of short Getting Started and beginner videos—with more to come each month!


These shorter videos are accessible from the Ancestry Academy home page, as well as through links on relevant pages of the Ancestry website and its related product sites, Fold3 and Newspapers.com.


I noted that Ancestry was the sponsor of the in-between videos of the live streaming at last weekend's Jamboree, and they were very good.


The three new videos that may interest you are -


Discovering the History of Your House on Ancestry, with Marian Pierre-Louis


Family History: Putting the Pieces Together, with Donna M. Moughty 


Behind the Scenes: The Science Behind AncestryDNA Results, with Catherine A. Ball, PhD 


They are on https://www.ancestry.com/Academy/courses/recommended 


There is more news from Ancestry this past week, when they released a press release to say that the Archives of Ontario is pleased to announce a partnership with Ancestry.ca to provide online access to Ontario's Vital Statistics records. 


Ancestry.ca will digitize and index original Vital Statistics records as they are transferred from the Registrar General's office to the Archives of Ontario and provide online access to these records on their website Ancestry.ca. 


All of these digitized records will be made available on the Ancestry.ca website for free in the Archives of Ontario Reading Room as well as in all public libraries across Ontario.

As of June 4, marriages from 1933 and 1934, and deaths from 1943 are available on Ancestry.ca website.
Also, deaths from 1944 will be released later this year.
Please note that the 1869-1911 births, 1869-1927 marriages and 1869-1937 deaths continue to be available on the Family Search website at https://familysearch.org.
Blogs

The question I have been asking lately  - “Is blogging dead?”  - raised it's ugly head again.
Randy Seaver, a blogger whose blog is Genea-Musings, noted at the Jamboree in Burbank last weekend that it was “the first one without a Blogger panel or special event of some sort”, and Louis Kessler's with his Behold Genealogy blog had seven blogs, including his own. 1,2
So what do you think? I read blogs, Facebook, and Google Alerts because it is part of my job, but I wonder how many other people do. I see the same people at these places, and not many new people with Blogs, or on Facebook. 
1. Randy Seaver, Ten Takeaways From the #SCGS2016 Genealogy Jamboree blog post, June 7, 2016; (http://www.geneamusings.com/: accessed 08 June 2016), Genea-Musings.
2 Louis Kessler, The OGS 2016 Conference Blog Compendium, June 7, 2016;
(http://www.beholdgenealogy.com/blog/?p=1734: accessed 09 June 2016), Behold Genealogy.

South Shore Genealogical Club
A friend of ours, Cheryl Lamerson, of the South Shore Genealogical Club in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, is opening a new SSGS Research Centre on Saturday, 11 June between 1 and 4.

Their new research centre is at the Lunenburg Academy, Room 203 and the ribbon cutting is at 2 pm.

They have been busy moving in their archives, setting them up, and preparing the materials for the opening day.

If you are in the area, be sure to drop by the opening. Or if you have an ancestor in the Lunenburg area, but cannot get to the place, you can contact them at http://ssgs.ca/our-holdings/

The website of the SSGC is at http://ssgs.ca/

And that was the week in Canadian news!
This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012! 
Be sure to tell your friends about us. 

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to genealogycanada@aol.com

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to www.elrs.biz

(c)2016 All rights reserved.

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 09 May 2016



I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

Saint John, New Brunswick 

In 1789, the Loyalist United Empire settlements of Parrtown and Carleton became Saint John, New Brunswick. It was Canada's first incorporated city. 

Today, it is known as the Fundy City, and be sure to read about the city's firsts. It is quite astounding for a city, today's population of about 70,000. 

If you would like to learn more, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_John,_New_Brunswick 

Montreal's First School  

In 1658, Montreal's first school, the Ville-Marie School, was opened in a stable. 

Governor Paul de Chomedey de Maisonneuve ceded to Marguerite Bourgeoys, and commissioned an abandoned stable to build the first school in Ville-Marie for the dozen or so school-aged children in the colony. 

To read about the school, go to http://www.archivesvirtuelles-cnd.org/en/node/2895


Social Media 

Audio: Ottawa colouring book 'total love letter' to capital 


Sharpen your pencil crayons — an Ottawa-themed colouring book featuring drawings from local artists is coming in the capital. 

Jason Cobill and Maxime Gauthier-Kwan were awarded a $1,000 Awesome Ottawa grant for their Ottawa in Colour project that reflects life in the capital. 

Newspaper Articles 

Nova Scotia 

In-class Gaelic program to be offered 


Baile nan Gàidheal/Highland Village will offer an in-class Gaelic program for students from May 16-19, to celebrate Gaelic Awareness Month. 

Halifax to consider scrubbing city of Edward Cornwallis 


Cornwallis founded Halifax in 1749. Later that year, he issued a bounty on the scalps of Mi'kmaq men, women and children. 

Demolition of Young Avenue mansion halted over safety concerns 


Demolition of a large home called the Cleveland Estate — also known as the wedding cake house — on Young Avenue in Halifax is temporarily on hold after an occupational health and safety officer discovered safety issues at the site. 

Ontario 

JOY OF GENEALOGY: The family Bible is a great place to research your family tree 


Old bibles may contain the trilogy of family records: births, marriages and deaths. Perhaps even more. Maybe an elusive maiden name is listed in the marriage records or a baptism is recorded for a child you didn’t know existed. 

Tecumseh statue to mark important War of 1812 battle 


Mark Williams can finally sit back and take in the life-size statue of Chief Tecumseh in his garage art studio. 

Standing almost three metres high, there is plenty of detail to look at with the statue carved out of clay and Styrofoam over the past six months. Williams now has the delicate task of cutting the statue into pieces so it can be sent off to be bronzed. 

Hundreds Gather at First Canadian Black History Summit 


Nearly 500 people recently gathered for the inaugural Canadian Black History Summit held in a meetinghouse of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The free conference, held April 16, 2016, was co-hosted by the nonprofit FamilySearch International (the genealogical arm of the Church) and the Ontario Black History Society. 

Families of the Kawarthas: The Batten Family 


Richard Batten came to Canada and died 1833 Mar 30, intestate (no will). His younger brother, William of Dummer, requested admon as the only relative in Upper Canada (admon is the legal permission to administer an intestate estate). 

Manitoba 

Winnipeg walkabout

http://www.winnipegsun.com/2016/05/04/winnipeg-walkabout

I would have been more engaged in history class if my teachers included more about how our city evolved, but for whatever reason there was little discussion about local past events.

Winnipeg’s roots are quite entertaining — just ask Matt Carreau, who has been organizer of Jane’s Walk the past six years.

Manitoba Curling Hall of Fame and Museum moving archives online 

http://www.metronews.ca/news/winnipeg/2016/05/03/manitoba-curling-museum-moving-archives-online.html

The Manitoba Curling Hall of Fame and Museum (MCHFM) announced during its annual hall of fame induction ceremony on May 1 that it has begun developing an online display of its vast collection of curling artefacts.

The decision to migrate the archives into a digital space follows the museum’s display spaces at The Forks and later the Bay downtown being lost.

Alberta

U of L’s Centre for Oral History and Tradition to offer public workshops 

http://www.nantonnews.com/2016/05/03/u-of-ls-centre-for-oral-history-and-tradition-to-offer-public-workshops

Oral history projects help bring the past to life through the voices of people who lived at the time. Members of the University of Lethbridge’s Centre for Oral History and Tradition (COHT), in partnership with the Galt Museum and Archives, are offering their expertise as oral historians to help southern Albertans make their projects a reality

British Columbia 

Further recollections of the historical society 

http://www.pinchercreekecho.com/2016/05/03/further-recollections-of-the-historical-society 

In last week’s Living History article, we had a look back at some of the chronicles of the Pincher Creek and District Historical Society. This year, 2016, marks the half-century celebrations of this agency which operates the Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village so it seems fitting to take a look back at some of its own history.

Canadian Stories this Week 

Have you completed your census yet? 

That has been the question on Canadian minds this week as our census has been distributed across Canada. The people have responded with unbounded joy when they filled it out, especially when they received the long-form census this week.

In fact, the StatsCan website confirms to CBC News that service to census was interrupted for 45 minutes this week. That is unheard of – especially for the county's census.

Genealogists has ticked off the box which say that they want their census information to be made public in 92 years, so we have made our wished made.

You have until May 10th to send it in.

You can read the website http://www.cbc.ca/news/trending/census-2016-nerds-1.3563808

Canadian blogger attends NGS 2016

As we approach the Ontario Genealogical Society's conference next month, the US NGS 2016 had their conference at Fort Lauderdale this week, and Christine Woodcock, the well-known Canadian blogger, posted Poor Turn Out at NGS 2016 was quite surprised that a low number had attended.

She asks why attendance was so light. But I think all attendance at conference is low since the early 2000's. It has been in the OGS, as well as attendance in the membership, year by year.

The reason for that? There are many reasons – the rise of Webinars, Goggle+ Hangouts, Live Streaming of certain lectures, the rise of look-ups on the Internet by hobby genealogists, the rise of DNA which lead the hobby genealogists to think that they have their solve genealogy; whereas, they may have not and they give up, the causes are many – often too numerous to delineate. But it all goes back to the rise of the Internet, and people have to put parts of their genealogy on the Net for free, and people can't see the advantage of going to conferences.  

Read the post at http://scottishgenealogytipsntricks.blogspot.com/2016/05/poor-turn-out-at-ngs-2016.html

And that was the week in Canadian news!

This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012!

Be sure to tell your friends about us.

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to genealogycanada@aol.com

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go towww.elrs.biz

(c) 2016 All rights reserved.

Monday, April 18, 2016

Canadian Week in Review 18 April 2016



I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

April 13, 1938 Death of Grey Owl 


On this date, Grey Owl--the Englishman who thought of himself as an aboriginal, and became a best-selling author, lecturer, and a pioneer in the world’s conservation movement--died. 

As a child, he had been fascinated by tales of the Canadian wilderness that he had read about as a child, which was in sharp contrast to his own life growing up in England. He decided to leave home, and come to Canada.

He was a popular columnist and author, and it was only after his death that people came to realize that he was really Archibald Stansfeld Belaney from Hastings, England, born September 18, 1888. 

For further information, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey_Owl 

April 15, 1945- British-Canadian Liberation of Bergen-Belson death camp 

In April 1`945, toward the end of the Second World War, the allies of Britain and Canada entered the Bergen-Belson concentration camp, to free the Jews sent to the camp by the Germans. 

After negotiations, the camp was declared a neutral zone, and the Allies forces entered on April 15. The combined British forces, augmented by Canadians, entered the camp, only to be horrified at what they found. 


Social Media 

(Audio) Fredericton rejects heritage-area subdivision restrictions 

Fredericton council has voted against more stringent rules for subdividing properties in the Saint Anne's Point heritage preservation area.

Council unanimously rejected the bylaw changes, which would have prohibited the creation of lots with less than 35 metres of frontage in the area of Saint Anne's Point. 

(Audio) Brent's Grist Mill to become future site of 'pasture for bees' 


Brent's Grist Mill, a run-down heritage site in Kelowna, British Columbia, dates back to 1871. 

The property, though, is about to get some fresh seed and become a sanctuary for wild pollinators like bees and butterflies, thanks to a partnership between the City of Kelowna and UBC-Okanagan. 

Newspaper Articles 

Nova Scotia 

Documenting clan history  


Curt Speight, an Amherst man, was recently made an honorary friend of the Clan Maclean Heritage Trust for the work that his company, Amherst-based IR Mapping, did mapping the family’s Scottish history.

Engage Nova Scotia survey on provincial identity get mixed reaction 


Nova Scotians were surveyed, and 71 per cent of those surveyed said they generally identify with their region of the province first, then the province overall.

Prince Edward Island 

P.E.I.'s Rachelle Gauthier finalist in national storytelling contest 


That's how Rachelle Gauthier describes her Acadian heritage in a moving video she recorded as part of a national contest sponsored by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). 

If you want further information on how to show how research funded by the council is "making a difference in the lives of Canadians" in a three minutes on video or in 300 words, then you can go to the SSHRC website at http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/home-accueil-eng.aspx.

Ontario 

JOY OF GENEALOGY: Family history can save lives 


April is Health Awareness Month, the perfect time to branch out and create a family medical tree from your family genealogy research. 

The Amateur Genealogist: Municipal Records – Part 1 


Municipalities provided an astonishing variety of records, all of them local (by definition!) and many just loaded with names of people living in that locality. 

Fraser Dunford, who is the Amateur Genealogist, has a new book called Ontario Land Records: a Beginner's Guide, which is available at the Ontario Genealogical Society (OGS) at their e-store at https://ogs.on.ca/ogsnewcart/. There will be a review of the book in the May issue of the OGS Families

ANAF: Importance of recognizing Vimy Ridge’s history 


As the anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge passed on April 9, The Vimy Foundation has several events planned to commemorate this historic event in Canadian and world history. 

You can go to the ANAF website for more information at their website at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Army,_Navy_and_Air_Force_Veterans_in_Canada 

Why Canada Is Going to Apologize to India’s Sikhs 


Did you know that the government of Canada will formally apologize next month for turning away hundreds of Indian immigrants from its shores more than hundred years ago?

The event in 1914 is known as the “Komagata Maru incident,” after 376 people, mostly Sikhs from Punjab in British India, were denied entry into Canada. 

The chartered ship they were traveling on was forced return to Kolkata and when it arrived in India, British soldiers killed more than a dozen passengers. 

Exhibition traces the cave carvings made by Canadian soldiers waiting to serve at Vimy Ridge 


Canadian soldiers that were holed up in caves up to 30 metres underground, in a chalk mine, in northern France as they prepared to join the attack on Vimy Ridge in April 1917, they left carvings on the wall which were discovered a number of years ago. 

Now a laser exhibit of the carvings are on their way across Canada, and I have heard that it is in Montreal now, and it will be making it way across Canada this summer. 

Saskatchewan 

Old fire hall among Regina buildings to get heritage protection 


Members of Regina's Municipal Heritage Advisory Committee will meet when they will consider recommendations to add four buildings to the city's list of properties that merit special protection from alterations. 

The four buildings are - 

Old No. 1 Fire Hall which was built in 1920 – 1921. It is located at 1654 11th Avenue (Osler and 11th). 

Frontenac Apts. which was built in 1929 and is located at Location: 2022 Lorne Street. 

Weston Bakery which was built in 1919, and is located at 1377 Hamilton Street (Hamilton and 8th Avenue). 

Somerset Block which was built in 1919, and is located at 1806 Smith Street. 

Canadian Stories this Week  

Library and Archives Canada 

Library and Archives Canada is systematically digitizing the service files of CEF soldiers from World War One, from box 1 to box 10686, which roughly corresponds to alphabetical order. Right now, they have digitized Box 4617 and the surname Hunt. 

Please check the database regularly for new additions, and if you still have questions after checking the database, you may contact them directly at 1-866-578-7777 for more assistance.

Today, 275,299 of 640,000 files are available online via their Soldiers of the First Would War: 1914 – 1918 database at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/first-world-war-1914-1918-cef/Pages/search.aspx 

On a personal note, my husband, Mario, currently a member of the Canadian Armed Forces, has had the unique opportunity and distinct honour and pleasure to work with these old and fragile (yet, very informative) personnel files at the LAC's Preservation Centre in Gatineau, Quebec. He says that the experience of handling a member's records, and, at times, x-rays and personal mementos within these files, is one he won't soon forget.

Glace Bay Heritage Museum launches new website 

Glace Bay, in the Cape Breton Island, has launched a new website, and the public was invited to the Glace Bay Heritage Museum in the Old Town Hall this past week to celebrate the launch of the museum's new website. 

The two-floored museum holds such things as the Marconi Room, where first Trans Atlantic Wireless Service was established between Table Head in Glace Bay and Ireland in 1907, and The Council Chamber, just to name a few of the exhibits. 

The new website is at http://www.oldtownhallglacebay.ca/ 


A church could become a genealogy centre in Quebec City 

This sounds like a fantastic plan! 

Église St-Jean Baptiste, located on St-Jean Street in the heart of the city, could house a genealogy centre for francophones across North America.

There are approximately 14-million people who are of French-Canadian descent in the northeast United States, besides people from France and all over the world who would be interested in this genealogy oasis in the centre of the city. 

Built in 1881, the church held the last mass last May 2015 because it couldn't afford the $10 million in necessary renovations. Not only do Espace solidaire hopes to open a digital genealogy centre, but also to re-open the closed community spaces and develop a welcome centre. 

The City of Quebec has given the Espace solidaire funds to conduct a feasibility report, and once that is finished (and hopefully the city votes for the development in a positive way), work can begin on the project. 

I will keep you posted! 

And that was the week in Canadian news! 

This e-newspaper has been published since April 2012! 

Be sure to tell your friends about us. 

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to genealogycanada@aol.com 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe 

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to www.elrs.biz 

(c)2016 All rights reserved.