Showing posts with label Saskatchewan. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Saskatchewan. Show all posts

Monday, January 9, 2017

Canadian Week in Review 09 January 2017


I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History 

Ice Storm 1998

05 January 1998 - The Ice Storm of 1998, caused by El Niño, hit southern Ontario and Quebec, resulting in widespread power failures, severe damage to forests, and a number of deaths.

(That day will live with me forever. I was awoken in the early morning by our dog to hear crashing noises as transformers blew. I went to the front door, and the sky was lit up by by the lights as the power went off, and the days of unrelenting freezing rain continued. We were without power for four days. And we went under another freezing rain alert again this past week and lost more limbs off of trees once again, including a big branch from our beautiful giant Fir.) 


Newspaper Articles 

Newfoundland 

Letter: Honouring Alcock and Brown 

On Saturday, June 14, 1919 British Royal Air Force officers Arthur Whitten Brown and John Alcock took off from a bumpy field in St. John’s, Newfoundland and soared into history as the first to fly the Atlantic Ocean non-stop. The takeoff site was christened “Lester’s Field” by Brown for the family that owned the property. 

Nova Scotia 


CFTA Tantramar Community Radio and the Tantramar Radio Players are taking to the airwaves to present The 1867 News. The show will begin later this month and feature daily newscasts from 150 years ago, when Canadians were preparing to enter into the federation known as Canada. 


A Canada 150 project from Annapolis Royal, N.S., weaving the rich history of the region into a traditional Scottish tartan has a Cochrane connection. 

Kimberly Gunn, who lived in Cochrane for 10 years before moving to Nova Scotia five years ago, has a strong link to the community. She and her husband come back to visit as often as they can, were bagpipers in the Cochrane Pipe Band, and Gunn continues to publish the Cochrane Visitors' Guide.

Neglect, corruption and the history behind Halifax's deadliest fire. 

The devastating fire broke out just before midnight at a Halifax institution, consuming everything in its path and taking the lives of 30 vulnerable people who had been asleep in their beds. 

More than a century later, a local author is delving into the shady history of the Halifax Poor House fire, which remains the deadliest blaze to ever occur in the city. 

Quebec 

From the archives: Awarding of a gold-headed cane to the first ship of the year started in the 1840s
http://montrealgazette.com/news/quebec/from-the-archives-awarding-of-a-gold-headed-cane-to-the-first-ship-of-the-year-started-in-the-1840s 

For most of Montreal’s long history, it was far different. Winter ice made the river impassable to sailing ships at least from mid-December to mid-April, and the advent of more powerful steam-driven ships in the middle of the 19th century didn’t extend the season by much.  

From the archives: Bonsecours was a market with style — and pretensions of grandeur — in 1847
http://montrealgazette.com/news/quebec/from-the-archives-bonsecours-was-a-market-with-style-and-pretensions-of-grandeur-in-1847  

On Jan. 6, 1847, Bonsecours Market still was not finished. Sharp eyes could see workers’ tools and supplies lying about. The police station in one of the building’s wings and the weighing station in the other — “superseding the wretched looking place now occupied for that purpose,” as the Gazette put it — were far from complete. 


Have you ever dreamed of being the sheriff of an old-timey frontier town? Perhaps you’re looking for a place to hitch your wagon? Or maybe you just wished you lived like a pioneer? Well, for the tidy sum of $2.8 million, you can turn those fantasies into reality in southern Quebec.

Ontario 

Canadian symbols on display at Museum London
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/canadian-symbols-museum-london-1.3921529

From the beaver and the moose to poutine and maple syrup, Canadian symbols will be on display at Museum London next week in preparation for the country's 150th birthday celebration.

The museum collected a host of artifacts, images and artwork that have become known as symbols of Canada's national identity, according to Amber Lloydlangston, the museum's curator of regional history.

Laid to rest: Identifying unknown Canadian soldiers who fell in battle in Europe
http://www.metronews.ca/news/canada/2017/01/04/laid-to-rest-identifying-unknown-canadian-soldiers-who-fell-in-battle-in-europe.html

It was a construction crew working on a hospital expansion that first came across human remains in 2010 near the pastoral French town of Vendin-le-Vieil — remains that would later prove to be those of an unknown Canadian soldier.

Over the six years that followed, the remains of 18 more missing Canadians would be found in the same area, either in small groups or alone where they fell nearly a century earlier.

Project adds Indigenous names to Canadian history
http://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/the-current-for-january-3-2017-1.3918513/project-adds-indigenous-names-to-canadian-history-1.3918516

They were called "Eskimo," "half-breed" or "squaw." The collection of photos of Indigenous people in the collections of Library and Archives Canada extends into the thousands — but often the Indigenous people in the photographs were not named, just labelled with words that sound offensive to modern ears.

Col. John McCrae gets the comic book superhero treatment
https://www.sootoday.com/local-news/col-john-mccrae-gets-the-comic-book-superhero-treatment-501435

Col. John McCrae is teaming up with six other lions of Canadian history to help save the world in a new comic book.

The Guelph author of In Flanders Fields is the central character in a work of historical comic book fiction by a pair of Guelph residents titled Group of 7.

Canada to celebrate Tamil Heritage Month in January
http://www.colombopage.com/archive_17A/Jan02_1483366672CH.php

Canada for the first time will celebrate the Tamil Heritage Month throughout January following its declaration by the Canadian House of Commons last year

Saskatchewan

History Matters: Grader operator unearths two ancient sites in Saskatoon landfill
http://thestarphoenix.com/opinion/columnists/history-matters-grader-operator-unearths-two-ancient-sites-in-saskatoon-landfill

It started out as a typical day for Charles Gowen, a heavy-equipment operator at the Saskatoon landfill. It was his job to scrape away dirt from a borrow pit and layer it over the trash. 

But on Sept. 1, 1977, when his grader had dug down about a metre, Gowen noticed that the colour of the soil was much darker, not its normal light sandy brown. Stopping to take a closer look, he found bone fragments and other organic material. 

Canadian Stories this Week 

New Year's Resolutions 

Well, have you made your New Years's Resolution, or do you call them something else, like goals for 2017? I prefer goals myself. I find that goals are more attainable, and I mention my goals in last week's newspaper http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2017/01/canadian-week-in-review-02-january-2017.html what I hope to attain in 2017. 

I found that The Genealogy Weekly January 4 2017 from Boston has in its weekly survey resolutions for 2017, and the most popular was organizing research papers, files, and photographs; followed closely by sharing genealogical information with other members of my by family, and sharing family history with our younger generations of my family.

That sounds familiar, doesn't it? I wonder what the success rate will be?

Something new at the Library and Archives Canada

I received a blog post from the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) entitled Introducing LAC’s guest curator blog series and our upcoming exhibition! 

They tell us to watch the LAC website at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/Pages/home.aspx because there will be new and exciting blog articles, and upcoming exhibition - Canada: Who Do We Think We Are? And this is in recognition of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation.

The exhibition opens on June 1, 2017, while the year-long blog series starts in January 2017.

The blog says that we will hear from the staff who helped develop the exhibition, including anecdotes about their work at LAC. The series also includes articles by scholars, experts and ordinary Canadians, who all depend upon LAC’s collection, from across Canada—and even the other side of the globe!

Visiting the exhibition

And be sure to visit the physical exhibition in downtown Ottawa where you can see these, and many other Canadian treasures, in person. Canada: Who Do We Think We Are? will be on display free of charge at the LAC headquarters at 395 Wellington Street between June 1, 2017, and March 1, 2018.

It sounds great and worth the visit.  

Be sure to tell your friends about us.

BTW, did you know that we celebrated our 9th blogiversary last week? We've been around since 02 January 2008! <http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2008/01/welcome-to-genealogy-canada-blog.html>

If you would like to subscribe, please send your email to genealogycanada@aol.com 

Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe 

Sponsored by Elizabeth Lapointe Research Services. To learn more about the research services offered by ELRS, go to www.elrs.biz


(c)2017 All rights reserved

Monday, September 29, 2014

Canadian Week in Review - 29 September 2014



I have come across the following Canadian websites, social media items, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

History Week in Canada


In 1780, Benedict Arnold escaped one day after his treason came to light in what was to become the United States. Arnold, a major-general, and commander of the American Fort West Point, had planned to surrender the fort to the British. He became a colonel in the British army, and later lived in Saint John, New Brunswick. He then returned to England, where he died in 1801.

===================================================
In 1962, the "Garden of the Provinces" in Ottawa was opened by Prime Minister John Diefenbaker.

To read more about this park, that is opposite the Library and Archives Canada, go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_of_the_Provinces_and_Territories
===================================================


Social Media


(Blog) The Recipe Project
http://recipes.hypotheses.org/4378
Valarie J. Korinek is the author of this blog, and a Professor of Canadian History at the University of Saskatchewan.

Nova Scotia

Delegates visit area for N.S. Heritage Conference
http://www.ngnews.ca/News/Local/2014-09-23/article-3879913/Delegates-visit-area-for-N.S.-Heritage-Conference/1
Pictou County, Nova Scotia hosted the Nova Scotia Heritage Conference.

History-Ed Coleman: First World War humour in Hansford’s stories
http://www.novanewsnow.com/Opinion/Columnists/2014-09-21/article-3875711/History-Ed-Coleman%3A-First-World-War-humour-in-Hansford%26rsquo%3Bs-stories/1
Born in 1899, the former Wolfville barber, Cecil Hansford, was 16 when he joined the Canadian Army to fight in the First World War.

Lighthouse mural by Yarmouth artist an attraction for Nova Scotia visitors
http://www.kingscountynews.ca/News/Local/2014-09-23/article-3878832/Lighthouse-mural-by-Yarmouth-artist-an-attraction-for-Nova-Scotia-visitors/1
A Yarmouth artist has painted a mural of 144 Nova Scotia lighthouses that will meet everybody who takes the ferry from Maine to this Nova Scotian town.

New Brunswick

N.B.’s 104th finally gets its due
http://thechronicleherald.ca/books/1239446-nb-s-104th-finally-gets-its-due
Regiment’s War of 1812 efforts shown to be more than a footnote.

Quebec

The Treaty of Paris is in town
http://www.lifeinquebec.com/the-treaty-of-paris-is-in-town-10088/
Quebec City (Quebec) 23 September, 2014 – The Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years’ War between France Britain and Spain. The actual treaty, that was signed on February 10, 1763, is on display at the Musée de la Civilisation starting today, September 23 until October 2nd.

Ontario

Excerpt #6 – The First World War: Excerpts from the diary of Woodman Leonard
http://www.ottawasun.com/2014/09/25/the-first-world-war-excerpts-from-the-diary-of-woodman-leonard
For links to the other installments, visit last week's CWR post at -
http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2014/09/canadian-week-in-review-22-september.html

Canadian government joins 11th-hour search for John A. Macdonald’s precise birthplace
http://o.canada.com/news/canadian-government-joins-11th-hour-search-for-john-a-macdonalds-precise-birthplace
Barely 100 days before planned celebrations to mark the bicentennial of Sir John A. Macdonald’s birth in Glasgow, Scotland, the Canadian government has joined in an 11th-hour search for the precise birthplace of the country’s founding prime minister.

Science and Technology museum closed until 2015
http://www.ottawasun.com/2014/09/23/science-and-tech-museum-closed-until-2015
The Canada Science and Technology Museum will remain close until at least January 2015 because of mould.

Health unit looks back at its history
http://www.northernlife.ca/news/localNews/2014/09/22-sdhu-history-sudbury.aspx
A painstaking account of Sudbury's environmental history, going back to 1883, when Sudbury was only a Canadian Pacific Railway Outpost.

Here are the details on the RCAF’s new uniforms and ranks
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/here-are-the-details-on-the-rcafs-new-uniforms-and-ranks
The Royal Canadian Air Force’s (RCAF) new uniform respects the contributions and sacrifices of airmen and airwomen who served – and continue to serve – with pride and professionalism.

Afghanistan added to Tillsonburg's cenotaph, dedication ceremony planned Oct. 7
http://www.tillsonburgnews.com/2014/09/25/afghanistan-added-to-tillsonburgs-cenotaph-dedication-ceremony-planned-oct-7

Local residents are invited to a special dedication ceremony at the town cenotaph on Tuesday, October 7th to honour members of the International Security Assistance Force who served in Afghanistan.

Alberta

Can we save McKay Avenue School? Or is our history doomed to be history?
http://blogs.edmontonjournal.com/category/edmonton-commons/
McKay Avenue School, built in 1904, also played host to Alberta’s first legislative assemblies. Today, it’s a school museum, and on the endanger list to be torn down.


Alberta Aviation Museum receives historic air mail letter
The letter was part of the very first air mail delivery in Western Canada, flown from Calgary to Edmonton on July 9th, 1918 by Katherine Stinson, in an insubstantial wood and fabric aircraft.

Bison treaty signed by Alberta, Montana tribes
1st treaty among tribes and First Nations in the area since the 1800s
Native tribes from the U.S. and Canada signed a treaty Tuesday establishing an inter-tribal alliance to restore bison to areas of the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains where millions of the animals once roamed.


British Columbia 

Aboriginal tourism operator rebuked for opening burial boxes for travellers
http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/aboriginal-tourism-operator-rebuked-for-opening-burial-boxes-for-travellers-1.2774255
The actions of an aboriginal tourism operator in British Columbia who gave some travellers access to ancient burial boxes, including revealing the skeletal remains inside, have been condemned by his fellow First Nations.

Story of the Week




The society’s webpage is changing
(Editorial)

In years gone by, I used to go to a society’s website to see what was new with the organization, as well as its events,  latest publications, and their yearly executive.

There was so many changes I used to highlight it on my old news summary every week, and later, the Canadian Week in Review, but as time marched on, websites became less and less important, while on the other hand, the Member’s-Only webpages in the majority of a society’s website were becoming more important.

Then, about three years ago or so, the use of blogs by societies became the go-to media of choice for societies. But blogs quickly went out of style, mainly because they needed someone to look after them as people naturally graduated toward them. They needed someone to update them on a daily basis, and it became a hard job to find somebody within the society to take on that responsibility. And then Facebook came into the picture!

In a way, Facebook is their saving grace, because it can do everything that a webpage can do, plus it can add photos, videos, and other people can quickly comment on the posting, so it’s an "everybody" page. People have a feeling that the society belongs to them; whereas, the webpages and even blogs seemed somewhat distant, and there has to be a reason why only about 10% of the genealogy audience reads blogs, while as many as 70% read Facebook to see what is going on (according to a recent survey).

And now Google+ is making inroads on Facebook, although I believe that people are so used to Facebook now, it will be difficult to switch over to Google+. Most of the genealogists I know use Goggle+, along with a combination of Facebook, and yes, even blogs to keep up the date on genealogy news. And with the acquisition of YouTube, and video "Hang Outs", where you can actually listen to a person or people talk about one's favourite subject – Genealogy – it makes for a good combination.

So that is where I see genealogy going these days, until a new idea comes along.

How about you? Have you found that genealogy is cha
nging the way they get their word across to people? What have you experienced?

Let me know your thoughts, and I might post them in a future issue of CWR!

I can be reached at genealoygcanada@aol.com

Reminder: Check the Canadian Week in Review next Monday for the latest in Genealogy, Heritage, and History news in Canada. It’s theONLY news blog of its kind in country!

The next post will be on 06 October 2014.

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

UPDATE: Saskatchewan Catholic Church Records

Julia Adamson at saskgenweb@yahoo.com wrote a blog on FamilySearch.org yesterday about the announcement of Saskatchewan Catholic Church Records on Family Search.

She gives a very good history of the Catholic records (baptisms, confirmations, marriages, burials) in Saskatchewan, and other records between 1846 -1957.

If you have any ancestors in Saskatchewan, you should read the blog https://familysearch.org/blog/en/announcing-saskatchewan-catholic-church-records-family-search

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Regina Saskatchewan Family History Centre (FHC) News

John Williams, FHC Director, has sent us the following news story -

The Family History Centre at 550 Sangster Blvd. in Regina has recently undergone a “high-tech barn raising” to help individuals and groups succeed in their genealogical research efforts. Here are some of the changes we have made:

• New Computers: We recently set up four new Dell Optiplex 9010 AIO computers. With 4 GB of RAM and i5 processors, these machines offer considerably more speed and shorter processing times than their predecessors.

• New Printers: We have installed two new printers: a Lexmark E460dn and a Lexmark X466de. The X466de is a multifunction unit with copy, scan, fax and printing capabilities.

• New Software: Every Family History Centre computer now has a large selection of genealogy software including Roots Magic, PAF Companion, Ancestral Quest and Legacy Family Tree. For more details, see www.familysearch.org/products and the attached spreadsheet. The software provides new ways of organizing family information and enables the generation of a wide variety of reports including pedigree charts, family group sheets, relationship charts, wall charts and timeline charts.

• New Inventory List: For the first time, the FHC has published an electronic catalogue of its inventory including more than 1500 in-stock microfilms, 100 books and 150 maps.

• Premium Websites: The Family History Centre provides researchers with free access to a wide range of genealogy research websites that make it possible to search for an ancestor by typing in a name. Available sites include Ancestry, Find My Past, Heritage Quest and World Vital Records.

• Family Tree Training: In conjunction with the recent release of the New FamilySearch and Family Tree to the public, the Family History Centre offers its patrons free training on the use of these websites.

• Microfilm Ordering: Family History Centre patrons have access to the world’s largest collection of microfilms and microfiche. Films can be ordered online at https://familysearch.org/catalog-search Both 60 day & permanent loans are available.

The Family History Centre is open on Tuesdays from 6:30 PM to 9:00 PM and on Thursdays from 9:30 AM to 3:30 PM. The Centre closes at 12:00 PM on Thursdays in July and August.

As always, Family History Centre staff offer one-on-one assistance to individuals pursuing their own genealogical research.

If you have any questions regarding the Family History Centre, please do not hesitate to contact me at http://inbox463@hotmail.com

Check your Family History Centre on a regular basis because there is always something new. You can get the address of your local FHC by going to https://familysearch.org/locations

Sunday, February 24, 2013

UPDATE: Alberta, Manitoba & Saskatchewan Cemeteries

GenWeb Canada has put on the following updates –

ALBERTA

Barrhead:

- St Anne Roman Catholic Cemetery

Ponoka:

- Bismark Lutheran Cemetery

MANITOBA

Brokenhead RM:

- St Mary's Roman Catholic Cemetery

Lansdowne RM:

- Arden Cemetery

Westbourne RM:

- Gladstone Cemetery

Winnipeg City:

- Chapel Lawn Memorial Gardens

SASKATCHEWAN

Birch Hills RM:

- Holy Trinity Cemetery

Corman Park RM:

- First Saskatchewan Cemetery

- Kirilowka Cemetery

- Memorial Cemetery

Insinger RM:

- Theodore Cemetery

Torch River RM:

- Corner Lake Cemetery

To go to the above cemeteries, click on to
http://canadacems.blogspot.ca/2013/02/alberta-manitoba-saskatchewan-update.html

GenWeg Canada recognizes the following people, who do this work for free. They are Flora Stewart, Patricia Green and Julia Adamson for their help indexing. Flora Stewart, George Fedyck, Gloria MacDonald, Gordon Neish, Linda Doran, Patricia Green, Roy Hermanson, and Wayne Sys for photos.

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Library and Archives Canada Update: Census of the Prairie Provinces, 1916 Database

The Library and Archives Canada has just released this piece of news –

“In 1916, the Canadian government enumerated, for the second time, the Prairie Provinces (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta) in order to track the high rates of population growth in western Canada.

Previously, users could search only by geographical information such as province, district and sub-district. It is now possible to also search by nominal information such as name, given name(s) and age for an individual.

Previously, users could search only by geographical information such as province, district and sub-district. It is now possible to also search by nominal information such as name, given name(s) and age for an individual”.

Go to www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/census/1916/Pages/1916.aspx

Thursday, January 24, 2013

City of Saskatoon North Downtown Master Plan Open House

On January 26th 2013, the City of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada will hold a meeting at the Saskatoon Farmers' Market where the City of Saskatoon will start a master plan for the North Downtown area, and they want to hear what your thoughts and comments are.

The session runs from 8:30 am to 1:00 pm. The City wants to design a new neighbourhood that is: environmentally friendly, well-connected to the things you need to meet your daily needs, easy to walk around in, celebrates the city’s heritage, built around amenities like green public spaces, and a vibrant and great place to live.

Additional information is available at www.saskatoon.ca

The Wikipedia page is at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saskatoon

The Saskatoon Branch of the Saskatchewan Genealogical Society is at
www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~sksgs

© Elizabeth Lapointe All Rights Reserved

Sunday, February 26, 2012

Library Lover's Month

I did not know it, but February was Library Lover’s Month! And the Yorkton Public Library in Yorkton, Saskatcewan, http://ypllibrary.wordpress.com/, recently had a flood at their location. They renovated their location, and rededicated their library.

One area where there is particular pride is a new multi-use room, currently unnamed, which has a fireplace and is designed to encourage people to "sit down and read." The room, established in honor of Bob Ribchester, a former board member, also houses materials from the Yorkton Chapter of the Saskatchewan Genealogical Society www.parkland.lib.sk.ca/genealogy.htm. The space represents the library’s ideal of becoming a "third space", a place other than home and work where people come to spend time and are comfortable.

This sounds like a great idea to have a room like this in a library.

Congratulations, Yorkton Public Library, and Happy Library Lover's Month to all!
___________________________________________________

Talk about books, have you had a chance to read about my booklets on the War of 1812 and on migration?

Books

I have just published two booklets - The War of 1812: Canada and the United States, and Migration: Canada and the United States.

They are available for purchase through Global Genealogy at http://globalgenealogy.com/, the National Institute of Genealogical Studies at http://www.genealogicalstudies.com/, and now, in the U.S., from the Family Roots Publishing Company at http://www.familyrootspublishing.com/.

For more on the booklets, go to http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2012/01/booklet-1-war-of-1812-canada-and-united.html and http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2012/01/booklet-2-migration-canada-and-united.html

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

French-Canadian Societies


Marc-Amable Girard (1822–1892) was the second Premier of the Western Canadian province of Manitoba, and the first Franco-Manitoban to hold that post.

There are lots of French-Canadian societies in Quebec, but did you know that there are French-Canadian societies in other parts of Canada? French-Canadians—as they expanded westward across Canada—settled in villages, towns, and cities in Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta.

Ontario

In the 2006 Canadian census, there were 488,815 French-Canadians in Ontario. They make up 4.1 per cent of the province's total population.

They are mainly concentrated in Eastern Ontario (in the cities of Ottawa, Cornwall, and towns in-between), Northeastern Ontario (in the cities of Sudbury, North Bay, and Timmins), and in Toronto, Windsor, Penetanguishene, and Welland.

There is Le Réseau du patrimoine franco-ontarien (RPFO) at http://rpfo.ca. This is a collection of over 30 French-Canadian societies in Ontario. Some sites are bilingual(F/E), while others are strictly in French, but they all have good information.

Manotiba

The majority of Franco-Manitobans (about 90%) live in the Greater Winnipeg area. There are Franco-Manitoban centres in Notre-Dame-de-Lourdes, St. Claude, St. Pierre-Jolys, Ste. Anne, Ste. Rose du Lac, La Broquerie, Lorette, St. Laurent, Somerset, and St-Lazare.

The Manitoba Genealogical Society www.mbgenealogy.com covers all linguist groups in the province.

There is also The Manitoba Historical Society at www.mhs.mb.ca, and the Centre du patrimoine, Société historique de Saint-Boniface at http://shsb.mb.ca in which you can access the library database (in French), and the Voyageur contracts database (in French).

Saskatchewan

French-Canadians make up about 2 per cent of the population of Saskatchewan, and live in the cities of Regina, Saskatoon, Prince Albert, and Moose Jaw. They also live in small towns such as Gravelbourg, Albertville, Duck Lake, Ponteix, Zenon Park, and Bellegarde.

Saskatchewan Genealogical Society www.saskgenealogy.com This society has 20 branches throughout the province, and covers the many peoples (including the French-Canadians) who settled there. Also, check La Société historique de la Saskatchewan at www.societehisto.com They have many published books such as La trace des pionniers, and offer a quarterly journal.

Alberta

The French-Canadians are centered in the Bonnie Doon area of Edmonton, in the towns of Bonnyville, Plamondon, and St. Paul in the northeast, and in the settlements of St. Isidore and the Municipal District of Smoky River No. 130, including the towns of Falher, Donnelly, McLennan, and Girouxville, as well as in north-central Alberta.

La Société généalogique du Nord-Ouest www.sgno.ca is located in Edmonton, and they have been a society since 1991. They have a very inclusive research library.

Tomorrow Post: Canadian Archival Societies

Wednesday, December 3, 2008

Saskatchewan's "Valued-Added" Membership

The Saskatchewan Genealogical Society has put something new in its membership - a value-added package, beginning in 2009!

In a special page on their site, http://www.saskgenealogy.com/aboutsgs/Value_Added.htm , they will add the following to their regular membership -

Saskatchewan Residents Index (SRI) -

Burial Index - index of burial information of 50,000 individuals

Obituary Index - index of obituary information of 75,000 individuals

Cummins Maps - name and location of individuals in the 1920s

Change of Name Index - index of individuals who changed their name and are listed in the Saskatchewan Gazette from 1971 to 1950

RCMP Obituary Index - index of name as well as the source for the obituary

NW Rebellion War Claims Index - the names of those who requested compensation after the 1885 NW Rebellion.

Rural Municipalities Historical Documents Index - an index that will list documents held by municipalities - such as tax assessment rolls.

Plus, the Saskatchewan Genealogical Society and the Ontario Genealogical Society www.ogs.on.ca also have joined in offering a $5.00 discount in membership fees for 2009!http://www.saskgenealogy.com/aboutsgs/Value_Added.htm

Saturday, November 22, 2008

FamilySearch Looking for Volunteers!

FamilySearch International is going to make the indexes to the 1861, 1871, and 1916 census available online for free with the help of online volunteer indexers, and an agreement with Ancestry.ca.

The press release says that "Online volunteers are needed to help transcribe select information from digital images of the historical documents into easily searchable indexes."

The completed indexes will be available for free at <www.familysearch.org>.

If you want to become a volunteer, you can start right away by registering online at <familysearchindexing.org>, by downloading the free indexing software, and selecting the 1916 Canada Census project.

It will take about 30 minutes to finish one page of the census, and the volunteer has one week to finish it, if need be.

"The 1916 census was selected first because it is the most recent and smallest of the three census targeted in the first place. It included three of the western provinces (Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Alberta), and has about 1.7-million names - so it will not take long to complete," said Stephen Young, FamilySearch Project Manager.

It is interesting that they have picked three personalities known to people, that is; Arthur Gordon Kelly (Art Linkletter), Sir William Samuel Stephenson (real-life inspiration for James Bond), and Elvina Fay Wray (Fay Wray) who appeared in the 1916 census as example of people you can meet along the way to indexing the census - to make it more interesting to transcribe, I suppose.

The Library and Archives Canada (LAC) owns, and is providing the digital images for, the Canada Census Project.