Showing posts with label Edmonton. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Edmonton. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Relatively Speaking

The newsletter of the Alberta Genealogical Society headquartered in Edmonton, Alberta, has over 10 indexes of their newsletter "Relatively Speaking" online.

You can search their individual indexes to the newsletter, with issues starting online at 2004. There is also a summary of the newsletter, and supplements such as Bylaw Changes, AGM 2012, and Policy Changes.

The full issue of the newsletter itself is available at the Member’s Only website online at www.abgensoc.ca.

Moreover, they have great news!

The 40th Anniversary will be held next year, in 2013, in Edmonton. It will be celebrated at the Alberta Genealogical Society, Conference 2013, to be held April 20 & 21, 2013,

The website is www.abgensoc.ca.

The blog about the conference is at www.abgensoc.ca/AGSConference2013.jpg

Saturday, October 29, 2011

Victoria's Chinatown

Victoria's Chinatown, the first of the Chinatowns in Canada, received the first of its kind – its story has been told in a pamphlet that people can take with them as they walk down the streets of Chinatown.

David Chuenyan Lai, professor emeritus of geography at the University of Victoria and honorary citizen of Victoria first thought of the project. The project consists of a folded poster entitled "A Brief Chronology of Chinese Canadian History", and it covers the years from 1788 to 2010.

Lai is busy producing inserts of the other seven Canadian Chinatowns in Vancouver, Ottawa, Toronto, Edmonton, Calgary, Winnipeg and Montreal.

Read the rest of the story at
http://www.timescolonist.com/travel/pamphlet+details+Chinatown+history+provides+walking+tour/5619264/story.html

A special "Canadian Obituaries" updated websites and blogs will be listed here on Monday October 31st!

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

120th Anniversary of Ukrainian Settlement

Over 1.2 million Ukrainian-Canadians are celebrating this year's events in the 120th Anniversary of settling in Canada.

They have completed the Historical Train of Ukrainian Pioneers from Halifax stopping in Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg, Saskatoon, and Edmonton where they traced the steps of the people who came here in 1891; yesterday they honoured the annual Black Ribbon Day in which they remembered the victims of Communism and Nazism in Europe, and on the 24th of October of this year they will celebrate Ukrainian Day on Parliament Hill.

To view the history of Ukrainian-Canadians, the website is at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukrainian_Canadian

To view the Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village, visit the http://www.history.alberta.ca/ukrainianvillage/default.aspx


Wednesday, November 5, 2008

Vigile 1914-1918 Vigil

Last night while coming home from the hockey game between the Ottawa Senators and the Washington Capitals (which Ottawa won - yes!), we drove past the National War Memorial at the corner of Wellington and Elgin Streets, across from the famous Chateau Laurier Hotel. It was 11:41 p.m.. Although there were no people present, the names of some of the 68,000 First World War soldiers were there on the memorial itself. It was the first night of Vigile 1914-1918 Vigil <www.1914-1918.ca>.

The project is to symbolically "repatriate" the Canadian soldiers who never made it back to their homeland, and to remember them on an individual basis, rather than as a collective during Remembrance Day ceremonies. The display which will be active in the evenings until Remembrance Day on November 11th. This vigil will also be held in Halifax, Fredericton, Toronto, Regina, and Edmonton.

You can look up the names of the dead on the website. You will find their surname, their first name and/or initials, service number, their rank, their regiment, their date of death, and the date their names will be projected on the National War Memorial.

In my case, I never had anyone die in the First World War but I looked up the surname of BARCLAY and found 18 soldiers who had died from 1916 to 1920.

The project was thought up by R.H. Thomson, a Canadian actor, and lighting designer Martin Conboy.