Showing posts with label Ireland. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ireland. Show all posts

Friday, March 15, 2013

UPDATE: Ancestry is FREE


In addition to searching for your Irish ancestors as posted in yesterday’s blog, you can now do it for FREE until midnight March 17, 2013.

Whether they began in Ireland or Italy, you can explore your roots with FREE ACCESS to select immigration collections — including some just-added records.

Fascinating immigration stories are here for you to discover. Start now


Go to their Facebook page where they have a recipe for Irish stew at http:www.facebook.com/Ancestry.ca

Thursday, March 14, 2013

Ancestry.ca UPDATE: Discover your Irish Ancestors




St. Patrick’s Day is right around the corner, and now is a good time to go to Ancestry.ca and discover what records they have for Irish immigrants to Canada.

They even have an excellent video for you to watch, and it gives good tips on how to find your Irish immigrants to Canada. It is very good.

So have fun as you look through the records to find Irish people who came to Canada.

The video is at www.ancestry.ca/cs/ca/canadianirish

Friday, November 23, 2012

Irish Protestant Benevolent Society


The 5th Annual Lecture of the Irish Protestant Benevolent Society will take place on Friday, January 18, 7:00 p.m.at the Hall Building, 1455 de Maisonneuve W., Room 1001.01 (10th floor) in Montreal.

The speaker will be Professor Donald Akenson, Queen's University, Kingston, and he will talk about “Wicklow Protestants and the World of Evangelicalism”.

Dr. Donald Akenson is an internationally acclaimed scholar and author who is considered the world's foremost authority on the Irish Diaspora. Akenson received his B.A. from Yale University and his doctorate from Harvard University. He is Professor of History at Queen's University Kingston, Ontario and Beamish Research Professor at the Institute of Irish Studies, University of Liverpool, and Senior Editor of the McGill-Queen's University Press.

As of 2007 his work included eighteen non-fiction books, including more than a dozen about Irish history, and five novels. Akenson won the Grawemeyer Award for God's Peoples (1992) and the Trillium Book Award for Conor: The Biography of Conor Cruise O'Brien (1994). His book on the Bible, Surpassing Wonder (1998), was short-listed for the 1999 Governor General's Award for nonfiction. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the Royal Historical Society (UK).

This event is FREE and open to the public.

The webpage is www.irishpbs.ca

Sunday, November 18, 2012

Call for Presentations for the BIFHSGO Conference 2013


Ken McKinlay of the British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa (BIFHSGO) has just sent me this call for proposals -

"The British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa (BIFHSGO) is seeking proposals for presentations at its 19th annual conference, September 20-22, 2013 to be held in Ottawa at Library and Archives Canada.

The focus this year will be on Ireland.

Proposals for other presentations besides those on Ireland are also invited as well as proposals for workshops or seminars on the Friday (September 20, 2013).

Details on writing the proposals can be found at www.bifhsgo.ca under the Conference heading. Please send your proposals to
conference@bifhsgo.ca before January 31, 2013."

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Genealogy Tourism

Yesterday, the Asian Edition of the eTravelBlackboard website posted a story on genealogy tourism, the “new travel trend” in the UK and Ireland.

Is there a company in Canada which offers "Genealogy Tourism”?

To check out the whole story, go to www.etravelblackboardasia.com/article/86896/genealogy-tourism-the-new-travel-trend

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Dwyers/O’Dwyers Reunion

I have received the following press release from Marilyn Dwyert concerning the Dwyers/O’Dwyers reunion. She told me that the Clan meet every 3 years and has always been in Tipperary, Ireland in the past, but this year it takes place in Williamsburg, VA in the States.

‘The reunion will gather once more in 2012, this time in the U.S. at Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia from Thurs-Sat Sept 20-22nd inclusive.

The setting is indeed historic. Williamsburg, together with sister towns Jamestown and Yorktown, form the Historic Triangle and is probably the most-visited historic site in the States. The epicenter at Colonial Williamsburg comprises a fully restored town with many surviving original buildings as well as newly reconstructed replicas on over 300 acres, and claims to be the “largest outdoor museum in the world”. With period costumes and the occasional re-enactment, the visitor gets a real feel for life in the days of the American Revolution.

It promises to be a great weekend for young and old, and all those associated with the O’Dwyer name are very welcome to attend. It will be an ideal opportunity to meet new friends, and who knows, maybe find a long-lost cousin or two.

We hope to see you there”.

You can go to www.dwyerclan.com

Monday, July 23, 2012

FindMyPast Ignores Canada

The British site FindMyPast.com is starting to begin an International Records web site.

They will include international records from England, Ireland, Scotland, Australia and Wales. Where is Canada! Canada is among the missing.

When will this county be included? There are lots of records here that could go on their site.

For those who want to search the new records, there is an introductory offer for the World Subscription of $4.95/month (U.S. funds) instead of the normal $20.83/month.

Thursday, March 1, 2012

Canadian Emigration: Parliamentary Papers of 1826

The following press releases was received from FindMyPast, and it says, in part -

“This parliamentary paper publishes the correspondence and extensive supporting documents of the British government with the Governor-General of Canada concerning the settlement of poor Irish in the Newcastle District in 1826, or 'Mr. Robinson’s Emigrants' as they became known. This was the result of a Commons request to be furnished information on the settlement as it had been publicly funded.

The official title of this parliamentary travel and migration record is:

Return of the Assessed Value of the Townships in the Newcastle District in Western Canada, which were settled by Pauper Emigrants from Ireland, between the years 1825 and 1828 at the public expense: Of the number of various Emigration Societies formed in Canada in 1840, by Canadian Proprietors desirous of Settling Emigrants from Great Britain and Ireland upon their Estates. (1848)”.

Initially the Governor-General just sent updated valuations of the relevant townships (Ashpodel, Douro, Dummer, Emily, Ennismore, Ops, Otonabee and Smith) which had since be designated as part of the District of Colbourne. But following further demands for information, he sent a detailed breakdown of every plot settled by Irish paupers in 1826 by Peter Robinson.

The details listed include:

- Name of the 1826 settler
- Number in the settler’s family
- Lot number
- Concession
- Acreage
- Number of acres cleared by 1847
- Number of horses and horned cattle on the plot
- Name of present occupants on lot
- Relationship of occupants to settler
- Other critical pieces of information

In total, around 260 plots are covered, giving details of over 700 people. While this is a short publication, it is an essential migration resource for those who became known as the Robinson Irish settlers, and indeed, for anyone in Southern Ontario with an Irish family history.

The information is at http://www.findmypast.ie/

Monday, December 29, 2008

LAC Partners with the National Archives of Ireland

The Library and Archives of Canada www.collectionscanada.gc.ca is pleased to announce that the Archives of Ireland www.census.nationalarchives.ie has released the latest phase of "an online research tool for the Irish counties of Antrim, Kerry, and Down for 1911. The census records for all countries for 1911 and for 1901 will be made available online throughout 2009".

"With 70-million Irish diaspora around the world, and up to one-fifth of Canadians claiming Irish heritage, this project will connect even more people to their historical," stated Ian E. Wilson, Librarian and Archivist of Canada.

The LAC and the NAI collaborated on other projects including two Irish studies held in 2006 and 2008 (I attended this one*); the Irish-Canadian Documentary Heritage at the LAC, and the popular website, The Shamrock and the Maple Leaf at www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/ireland.

Making these records accessible online will give genealogists and historians around the world the chance to explore the age, occupation, religion, and marital status of individuals. It will also allow research on Irish on Irish society of the early 20th century. The National Archives of Ireland have provided vibrant historical essays on topics such as social life, government, sport, and religion, and the photographs depicting life in Ireland in 1911.

The census records can search free of charge, and it is searchable by name.

* (For more on the 2008 Irish Studies I attended, please visit these four pages):
  1. http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2008/09/irish-studies-symposium.html
  2. http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2008/10/irish-symposium-2008-at-library-and.html
  3. http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2008/11/library-and-archives-canada-launches.html
  4. http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2008/12/450-years-of-fishing.html

Monday, December 1, 2008

Who are the Canadian Palatines?

The Palatines were Protestants who left the German Palatine Region in 1709 at the invitation of Queen Anne of England, and they settled in various English lands and eventually, Ireland.

In the 1830s, 185 families left Ireland and settled in Canada - mainly Ontario.

Over the years, their friends and family in Ireland started to follow them to Canada, and soon you had settlements in Ontario full of Irish Palatine names such as Barkman, Dolmage, Embury, Fizzell, Heck, Lawrence, Ruttle, Switzer, Sparling, and Teskey - to name a few.

To commemorate the 1709 migration, many Palatine descendants are planning events in North America and Ireland.

If you are interested in any of the events, please email Bob Fizzell at palatines@mac.com.

During this past year, the Ontario Genealogical Society (OGS) www.ogs.on.ca also worked to set up an Irish Palatine Special Interest Group (SIG-IP).

This is the first SIG for the organization, and Don Hinchley, the Society's president, said they were accepted "In a unanimous vote at our Septwmber meeting, the Board of Directors approved the application of the Irish Palatines to join the OGS as our first Special Interest Group."

The SIG-IP is open to any person who would like to explore the common heritage of the German language, the Protestant religion, and migration to Ireland. The SIG will offer a website to its members and special sessions annually at the OGS conference www.ogs.on.ca/conference/index.html.

If you are interested in this new group, please contact the SIG through SIG-IP@ogs.on.ca.

I am in the middle of writing an article on this for Everton's Genealogical Helper for publication during the Palatine's 300th Anniversary in 2009.

Thursday, November 13, 2008

Ancestry.ca and the Library and Archives Canada

This is a story that's turning into a soap opera of sorts - it's becoming "the continuing story of LAC and Ancestry.ca".

In 2007, a partnership was drawn up between the LAC and Ancestry.ca, and it was announced at the 2007 Ontario Genealogical Society Seminar. I was there to hear it as well as were about 500 other people. It was as if the air had been sucked out the room - people were astounded by the news! "We didn't know that this was going on" - was the complaint of the people. It had come as a complete surprise!

Ancestry.ca said at that time that the release of the Quebec City Immigration Records was Number One on its list of things to do, and that they would make it available online at Ancestry.ca as well as the free LAC website. It is not on the LAC site - yet.

Then the Passenger Lists (Canada's Immigration Lists) from 1865 to 1935 was made public the first part of September on Ancestry.ca. That sort of caught me by surprise because I was expecting it to be released early in 2009 - but there it was - much to everyone's surprise. And it was not released at the LAC in Ottawa - but at Ancestry.ca headquarters in Toronto. It is supposed to be on the LAC site - but so far, it hasn't appeared.

And now, another press release in which Josh Hanna, a Senior VP of Ancestry International, and Ian Wilson, Chief Librarian and Archivist of Canada, are saying that Ancestry.ca will "digitize and index microfilm and original records (my italics) held by LAC and make these available to Ancestry.ca members." It goes on to say that "all of the digitized records will eventually be available free of charge to users of the LAC website". Notice that they say "digitized" records, and not "indexed" records.

Mr. Hanna says that "This is a win-win relationship for Ancestry to offer a wide range of Canadian collections to its members and in turn LAC will receive the expertise, experience and person hours that are required for imaging and indexing these records."

We all know that the LAC, being a government department, doesn't have the money to hire people (as the National Archives of Ireland has found out in its transcription of the 1901 and 1911 Irish census, and now has put it out to transcription companies to bid on it - they have said that they have chosen the company - but wouldn't say who it is at the Irish Symposium in Ottawa in November).

But I believe that this is the crux of the matter - the LAC simply does not have the money. So it has turned to Ancestry.ca to do the digitization and indexing of the microfilm and original records - and the LAC will take whatever it has agreed to put onsite. We will see what that is as time goes by.

In the meantime, were you as surprised as I when you opened the Globe and Mail newspaper yesterday morning, and read where Ancestry.ca had made a major mistake by putting a German soldier where there should have been a Canadian soldier in its Remembrance Day advertisement in the paper the previous day?

Ancestry.ca issued an apology and it said it will never happen again.