Showing posts with label border. Show all posts
Showing posts with label border. Show all posts

Saturday, February 23, 2013

Hostages Along the Border!

On Wednesday, February 27, the Morrin Centre in Quebec City will host a presentation on what American history often refers to as the French and Indian War. While many writers have focused on the trauma and homesickness experienced by the captives during their journey north, fewer have told the story of those who chose not to return to New England and subsequently integrated into life in Quebec.

Several of these former captives played an important role in the early history of Quebec, where their descendants live today. This presentation will be an opportunity to learn more about their story.

With words and pictures Jack Bryden will tell the fascinating story of the hundreds of English-speaking men, women and children captured in New England and brought as prisoners to New France before 1760.

The meeting will be held on Wednesday, February 27 at 7:00 p.m. at the Morrin Centre, 44 Chaussée des Écossais, Quebec City.

Admission is free.

For more information or to reserve your seat, call 418-694-9147 or visit

Thursday, March 8, 2012

Dave Obee Gives Two Talks

His first talk, entitled “Destination Canada”, will be given on Saturday, March 24th from 12:30 to 2:00 p.m. at the West Vancouver Memorial Library.

More than seven million people arrived in Canada from Europe, the United States, and Asia between 1815 and 1930.

This talk discusses the wide variety of sources that deal with immigration to Canada, including ship passenger lists (available from 1865 through 1935), border-crossing records, and naturalization and citizenship documents.

The second talk, “Writing Your Family History”, will be held from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. in the Welsh Hall, and touch upon the reason for writing a family history, and how a well-written story will make other family members more interested in the research that you are doing. He will also discuss ideas that will help you get over writer's block.

For more information, visit the West Vancouver Memorial Library at, or write