Showing posts with label John D. Reid. Show all posts
Showing posts with label John D. Reid. Show all posts

Saturday, September 29, 2012

John D. Reid is Going to RootsTech

Earlier this week, I posted that RootsTech was staring to fill up with people going to their 2013 conference (held March 21 to 23, 2013 in Salt Lake City), and now I read where John D. Reid, a blogger of all things Anglo-Celtic in Canada, and the official blogger at BIFHSGO,, is going to take in next year’s conference.

I will be waiting here in Ottawa for his posts on the conference, as he always seems to be able to pick out interesting people to talk to and things to do, while at these gatherings.

Also, I noticed that he mentioned that I was in the Oct/Nov 2012 issue of Internet Genealogy with an article on “Researching English Ancestors in the Province of Quebec”.

We both agree with the statement that while “researching English-speaking ancestors in Quebec ...  the Quebec Family History Society is fast becoming the place to conduct initial research because of the databases they hold or access”.

If you want to hear what Gary Schroder, President of the Quebec Family History Society has to say about the “Cadastral Numbers System: The Key to Quebec Land Records” then you should listen to Brian Glenn's interview with him in a two-part series on

Saturday, August 25, 2012

Lucille Campey Will Be at The BIFHSGO Conference

Just got a note from Geoff Campey, the husband of Lucille Campey, a lecturer at the BIFHSGO conference in September, and a special speaker at Toronto, also in September.

She will be in Canada to talk about her latest book in her series "The English in Canada" with title Seeking a Better Future - The English Pioneers of Ontario and Québec published recently by the Dundurn Group, Toronto.

In Toronto, she will be giving a public lecture about English emigration to Ontario and Quebec on Thursday 20th September at 7.30 pm at the Blessed Sacrament Parish Hall, 24 Cheritan Avenue, Toronto. For more information,call 416.482.4909 or

John D. Reid at has just interviewed Lucille, and I listened to it this morning.

She talked about her three lectures at the BIFHSGO Conference next month, and one of the lectures will be about the 200th Anniversary of the Red River Settlement in Manitoba, and it sound interesting.

Another lecture that she will give will be on the Highlanders who settled in Glengarry County in Eastern Ontario, and in other parts of Ontario.

Her website has been updated

Friday, January 13, 2012

Booklet #2 – Migration: Canada and the United States

To continue from yesterday's post on my newly-published booklets, the second one in the "Canadian Series" has been published.

"Migration: Canada and the United States" discusses the exchange of people who have crossed the borders even before the borders were set, as they are today.

The first two pages of the booklet concentrate on Canadians who went to the States. Headings include - The Acadian Migration; Migration to the "Boston States"; French Canadian Migration; Migration to the Midwestern and Southwestern States; and Migration from Canada to the United States Due to War.

The second part of the booklet is about the migration of Americans to Canada. Headings include - New England Planters to Nova Scotia; The United Empire Loyalists; The United States Migration to Central Canada; The United States Migration to Central Canada; The US Migration to the Prairie Provinces & the Yukon; Migration from the US to Canada as a Result of Wars; and Migration of Blacks from the US to Canada.

These headings offer good examples of those who came to Canada, or of Canadians who left for the US, and why.

The booklet gives a synopsis of what records to look for, the books written on the subject, where to find online resources, and a bonus list of some famous Canadians who migrated to the US.

Both the Migration and the War of 1812 booklets can be purchased from Global Genealogy and the National Institute for Genealogical Studies

The next booklet to come "off the presses" will be about Ontario's genealogical societies and groups, including some lesser-known "hidden gems", all of which may have the resources you need to help flesh out the Ontario branch of your family tree.

For more on our first booklet, "The War of 1812: Canada and the United States", go to

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Booklet #1 - The War of 1812: Canada and the United States

If you've wondered why you haven't seen me around much the past few months, I've been busy writing laminated 4-page research guides on topics of interest to genealogists tracing their Canadian roots.

Why did I write booklets instead of a book? It's because I wanted to present the information clearly in a compact format that you could take on research trips without having to worry about adding yet another bulky book to your (probably) overstuffed tote bag.

The guides provide a basic understanding of the subject, as well as listings of relevant books and online information. In short, it's a primer that covers sources from Canada, the United States, and the UK.

For example, the booklet, “The War of 1812: Canada and the United States”, gives a synopsis of the causes of the War, and details the battles that took place (who, where, and when), and which included British forces, Blacks, and Aboriginal warriors who fought on both sides of the conflict.

For a list of the contents, please visit the following blog and websites -

The booklets were mentioned on John D. Reid's Anglo-Celtic Connections blog yesterday (Jan 10th), and I thank him for the review.

The booklets are available for sale through Global Genealogy's website,, and are listed on their Facebook page,, and in their free online newsletter, You can also write them at, or call them toll-free at 1-800-361-5168.

They are also available at the National Institute for Genealogical Studies website at, by email at, or call the Institute toll-free at 1-800-580-0165.

I am happy to say that the booklets are selling briskly!

Tomorrow Post: Booklet #2 – Migration: Canada and the United States

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Genealogy in Canada Survey

There is a new survey online lead by Professor Leighann Neilson of the Sprott School of Business, and Emeritus Professor Del Muise of the History Department, both at Carleton University, Ottawa.

I was made aware of the survey by John D. Reid's blog "Anglo-Celtic Connections" this morning, and I took the survey this afternoon. They said it would take about half an hour, and it did.

They say “The objective is to secure accurate information concerning the resources engaged with by family historians/genealogists".

It is a wide ranging survey, and they have put in their opening remarks that it will be “the first stage of a broad national project“ What does this mean? I will be interested to see what their next “project” will be...

Monday, September 21, 2009

BIFHSGO Conference - Panel Discussion

On Sunday afternoon, at the closing of the BIFHSGO conference, a spirited panel discussion entitled, "Future Trends in Family History and Genealogical Research", was chaired by Glenn Wright.

L to R: Glenn Wright, Moderator, with panelists John D. Reid, Colleen Fitzpatrick, and Bryan D. Cook

Colleen brought up two points - you can't stop technology, and that the people who don't get with the program (newer technology) will eventually die out because this is where it is all heading.

Bryan said he see changes in four areas of genealogy -

He thinks that data will continue to go online as free and pay-per-view, that fee-based services will continue to increase and the market expand, that DNA testing will pick-up even more, and that people will go on telling the stories of their ancestors, but worries about who, or what service, will be available to safeguard the stories for the telling.

John said that he sees the next big thing on the horizon as the machine-read digitization of newspapers.

"If civil registration and census online was wonderful progress, digitized newspapers are, or will be, a revolution," he said.

You can read the full text of his remarks on his blog, <>.

He noted that none of the local newspapers have been digitized - those held by the Library and Archives Canada - but there is always hope!

There were about 150 attendees taking part, and when question time came, there were lots of questions.

The audience seemed generally affected by the discussion, and were concerned by the not being able to attract new members to the societies, and what they would do with their work of family histories after they had finished with them.

Saturday, September 19, 2009

2009 - Year of the Home Child

Did you know that 2009 is the Year of the Home Child?

I found out about it by reading the "Ottawa Branch News", which arrived in the mail recently. It was a short notice included under "Interesting Web Sites".

There is a British website <> dedicated to the Descendants of the British Home Children (BHC). They have appeared to have declared 2009 as the Year of the Home Child.

Between 1869 and 1948, over 100,000 children were sent to Canada from the UK.

They have had quite a few events (some of them are listed for Canada), but I was more interested in links they had to other organizations, of which one caught my attention because it is in Canada. They also have "Images From Our Past", which provides photos of Home Children.

Locally, there is the BIFHSGO Home Children Index at <>.

Dave and Kay Lorente—BIFHSGO Hall of Fame members—started researching Home Children in 1991, and later signed a memorandum of understanding with BIFHSGO to let them take over the researching for Home Children.

Today, when you go to the website, you will see their work in a free, searchable database.

So far, they have put on children who immigrated to Canada between 1869 and 1948, and the indexing of the Middlemore Home Children who arrived between 1873 and 1933.

Fellow Hall of Famer (2009) and blogger, John D. Reid, has written a book entitled, Researching Canada's Home Children, published in association with BIFHSGO.

These are great resources for one's Home Children research.