Showing posts with label French-Canadian. Show all posts
Showing posts with label French-Canadian. Show all posts

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Four new French-Canadian podcasts

Sandra Goodwin, an American blogger, now has four Podcasts on her website Maple Stars and Stripes at http://maplestarsandstripes.com/ where you can listen to her talk about these subjects - 

Beginning French-Canadian Research

The Dreaded ‘Dit’ Name

French Pronunciation and Text-to-Speech Aids

More French-Canadian Name Variations

She says that they have been “created as a way to share tips and tricks that might make it easier to research your French-Canadian family here in America as well as to trace them back in Quebec. We’ll discuss ways to make it easier to move around in French-language records, especially if you’re not a native French speaker, as well as take a look at different record groups, repositories, history, geography, culture, and methodology particular to French-Canadian genealogy”.

Sunday, June 9, 2013

Tracking down Francophones across America

The Morrin Centre will host Professor Dean Louder as he presents his first bilingual talk in which he will discuss the traces of French-Canadian settlements across the continent. 

Reading from his book and sharing photos from his travels, Louder will tell the stories of these little-known communities while illustrating the fact that Francophones here in Quebec are not the only French speakers to whom their roots, history and heritage are important in an ever-growing global society.

This presentation will take place on Wednesday, June 19 at 7 p.m., at the
Morrin Centre, 44 Chaussée des Écossais, Quebec City, Quebec.

Admission is free. To reserve, please contact us at 418-694-9147 or info@morrin.org.



Saturday, December 22, 2012

Dick Eastman and Tourtière Genealogy

Dick Eastman wrote in his newsletter this morning about his French-Canadian ancestry, and the making of the Christmas meat pie in an article called “Tourtière Genealogy”. 

He talks about how he has it every Christmas, but he didn’t realize that people from different parts of Quebec have different views on meat pies – and it is tied in with their ancestry.

The article came about because of a story in The Montreal Gazette by Susan Semenak in which she talks about the beloved French-Canadian food tourtière called “The genealogy of your tourtière: The Quebec Christmas feast staple, the tourtière, can reveal where a person’s family comes from”.

To read about it, go to www.montrealgazette.com/genealogy+your+tourti%C3%A8re/7683786/story.html

To read Dick's article, go to http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2012/12/tourti%C3%A8re-genealogy.html


© Elizabeth Lapointe All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

French-Canadian Societies


Marc-Amable Girard (1822–1892) was the second Premier of the Western Canadian province of Manitoba, and the first Franco-Manitoban to hold that post.

There are lots of French-Canadian societies in Quebec, but did you know that there are French-Canadian societies in other parts of Canada? French-Canadians—as they expanded westward across Canada—settled in villages, towns, and cities in Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta.

Ontario

In the 2006 Canadian census, there were 488,815 French-Canadians in Ontario. They make up 4.1 per cent of the province's total population.

They are mainly concentrated in Eastern Ontario (in the cities of Ottawa, Cornwall, and towns in-between), Northeastern Ontario (in the cities of Sudbury, North Bay, and Timmins), and in Toronto, Windsor, Penetanguishene, and Welland.

There is Le Réseau du patrimoine franco-ontarien (RPFO) at http://rpfo.ca. This is a collection of over 30 French-Canadian societies in Ontario. Some sites are bilingual(F/E), while others are strictly in French, but they all have good information.

Manotiba

The majority of Franco-Manitobans (about 90%) live in the Greater Winnipeg area. There are Franco-Manitoban centres in Notre-Dame-de-Lourdes, St. Claude, St. Pierre-Jolys, Ste. Anne, Ste. Rose du Lac, La Broquerie, Lorette, St. Laurent, Somerset, and St-Lazare.

The Manitoba Genealogical Society www.mbgenealogy.com covers all linguist groups in the province.

There is also The Manitoba Historical Society at www.mhs.mb.ca, and the Centre du patrimoine, Société historique de Saint-Boniface at http://shsb.mb.ca in which you can access the library database (in French), and the Voyageur contracts database (in French).

Saskatchewan

French-Canadians make up about 2 per cent of the population of Saskatchewan, and live in the cities of Regina, Saskatoon, Prince Albert, and Moose Jaw. They also live in small towns such as Gravelbourg, Albertville, Duck Lake, Ponteix, Zenon Park, and Bellegarde.

Saskatchewan Genealogical Society www.saskgenealogy.com This society has 20 branches throughout the province, and covers the many peoples (including the French-Canadians) who settled there. Also, check La Société historique de la Saskatchewan at www.societehisto.com They have many published books such as La trace des pionniers, and offer a quarterly journal.

Alberta

The French-Canadians are centered in the Bonnie Doon area of Edmonton, in the towns of Bonnyville, Plamondon, and St. Paul in the northeast, and in the settlements of St. Isidore and the Municipal District of Smoky River No. 130, including the towns of Falher, Donnelly, McLennan, and Girouxville, as well as in north-central Alberta.

La Société généalogique du Nord-Ouest www.sgno.ca is located in Edmonton, and they have been a society since 1991. They have a very inclusive research library.

Tomorrow Post: Canadian Archival Societies